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MeetChristians.com / Forums / Biblical & Theological Issues

No. 0     Original Topic:  From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 8:56 AM   Viewed 1300 times     
And...words and their meanings from other biblical sources.



Taunt

Taunt, verb transitive

1. To reproach with severe or insulting words; to revile; to upbraid.

When I had at my pleasure taunted her--

2. To exprobrate; to censure.

Rail thou in Fulvia's phrase, and taunt my faults.

T'AUNT, noun Upbraiding words; bitter or sarcastic reproach; insulting invective.

With sacrilegious taunt and impious jest.
No. 1     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 9:05 AM     
Provoke

Provoke, verb transitive [Latin provoco, to call forth; pro and voco, to call.]

1. To call into action; to arouse; to excite; as, to provoke anger or wrath by offensive words or by injury; to provoke war.

2. To make angry; to offend; to incense; to enrage.

Ye fathers, provoke not your children to wrath. Ephesians 6:4.

Often provoked by the insolence of some of the bishops--

3. To excite; to cause; as, to provoke perspiration; to provoke a smile.

4. To excite; to stimulate; to increase.

The taste of pleasure provokes the appetite, and every successive indulgence of vice which is to form a habit, is easier than the last.

5. To challenge.

He now provokes the sea-gods from the shore.

6. To move; to incite; to stir up; to induce by motives. Romans 10:19.

Let us consider one another to provoke to love and to good works. Hebrews 10:24.

7. To incite; to rouse; as, to provoke one to anger. Deuteronomy 32:21.

PROVO'KE, verb intransitive To appeal. [A Latinism, not used.]
No. 2     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 9:13 AM     
Delight

DELIGHT, noun

1. A high degree of pleasure, or satisfaction of mind; joy.

His delight is in the law of the Lord. Psalms 1:2.

2. That which gives great pleasure; that which affords delight

Titus was the delight of human kind.

I was daily his delight Proverbs 8:30.

DELIGHT is a more permanent pleasure than joy, and not dependent on sudden excitement.

DELIGHT, verb transitive

1. To affect with great pleasure; to please highly; to give or afford high satisfaction or joy; as, a beautiful landscape delights the eye; harmony delights the ear; the good conduct of children, and especially their piety, delights their parents.

I will delight myself in thy statutes. Psalms 1:219.

2. To receive great pleasure in.

I delight to do thy will. Psalms 40:8.

DELIGHT, verb intransitive To have or take great pleasure; to be greatly pleased or rejoiced; followed by in.

I delight in the law of God after the inward man. Romans 7:22.
No. 3     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 9:28 AM     
Who is Noah Webster

Noah Webster’s Bible

While Webster’s association with the dictionary is common knowledge, it is not so widely known that Noah Webster produced his own modern English translation of the Bible in 1833.

Though an excellent and highly accurate translation, Webster’s Bible was not widely accepted, due to the continued popularity of the ancient King James version. It was, however, the most significant English language translation of the scriptures to be done since the King James version of more than 200 years earlier.

The “Webster Version” of the Bible has actually enjoyed a recent increase in popularity in electronic and “online” formats (such as is available at WWW.BIBLES.NET and other Biblical resource websites) because it is one of few modern English translations of the scriptures which may be freely used without paying any royalty, as its age makes it public domain material.


Read more about Noah Webster at:

http://www.greatsite.com/timeline-english-bible-history/noah-webster.html
No. 4     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 1:03 PM     
Regenerate

REGEN'ERATE, verb transitive [Latin regenero; re and genero. See Generate.]

1. To generate or produce anew; to reproduce.

Through all the soil a genial ferment spreads, regenerates the plants and new adorns the meads.

2. In theology, to renew the heart by a change of affections; to change the heart and affections from natural enmity to the love of God; to implant holy affections in the heart.

REGEN'ERATE, adjective [Latin regeneratus.]

1. Reproduced.

2. Born anew; renovated in heart; changed from a natural to a spiritual state.
No. 5     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 3:40 PM     
Godly

GOD'LY, adjective [god-like] Pious; reverencing God, and his character and laws.

1. Living in obedience to God's commands, from a principle of love to him and reverence of his character and precepts; religious; righteous; as a godly person.

2. Pious; conformed to God's law; as a godly life.

GOD'LY, adverb Piously; righteously.

All that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer

persecution. 2 Timothy 3:12.
No. 6     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 3:51 PM     
Disorderly

DISORDERLY, adjective Confused; immethodical; irregular; being without proper order or disposition; as, the books and papers are in a disorderly state.

2. Tumultuous; irregular; as the disorderly motions of the spirits.

3. Lawless; contrary to law; violating or disposed to violate law and good order; as disorderly people; disorderly assemblies.

4. Inclined to break loose from restraint; unruly; as disorderly cattle.

DISORDERLY, adverb

1. Without order, rule or method; irregularly; confusedly; in a disorderly manner.

Savages fighting disorderly with stones.

2. In a manner violating law and good order; in a manner contrary to rules or established institutions.

Withdraw from every brother that walketh disorderly 2 Thessalonians 3:6.
No. 7     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 3:57 PM     
Submit

SUBMIT', verb transitive [Latin submitto; sub, under, and mitto, to send.]

1. To let down; to cause to sink or lower.

Sometimes the hill submits itself a while.

[This use of the word is nearly or wholly obsolete.]

2. To yield, resign or surrender to the power, will or authority of another; with the reciprocal pronoun.

Return to thy mistress, and submit thyself under her hand. Genesis 16:9.

Wives, submit yourselves to your own husbands. Ephesians 5:22.

SUBMIT yourselves to every ordinance of man. 1 Peter 2:13.

3. To refer; to leave or commit to the discretion of judgment of another; as, to submit a controversy to arbitrators; to submit a question to the court.

SUBMIT', verb intransitive To surrender; to yield one's person to the power of another; to give up resistance. The enemy submitted.

The revolted provinces presently submitted.

1. To yield one's opinion to the opinion or authority of another. On hearing the opinion of the court, the counsel submitted without further argument.

2. To be subject; to acquiesce in the authority of another.

To thy husband's will

Thine shall submit--

3. To be submissive; to yield without murmuring.

Our religion requires us--to submit to pain, disgrace and even death.
No. 8     Reply: Re: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 4:03 PM     
Verbatim wrote:

Who is Noah Webster

Noah Webster’s Bible

While Webster’s association with the dictionary is common knowledge, it is not so widely known that Noah Webster produced his own modern English translation of the Bible in 1833.

Though an excellent and highly accurate translation, Webster’s Bible was not widely accepted, due to the continued popularity of the ancient King James version. It was, however, the most significant English language translation of the scriptures to be done since the King James version of more than 200 years earlier.

The “Webster Version” of the Bible has actually enjoyed a recent increase in popularity in electronic and “online” formats (such as is available at WWW.BIBLES.NET and other Biblical resource websites) because it is one of few modern English translations of the scriptures which may be freely used without paying any royalty, as its age makes it public domain material.


Read more about Noah Webster at:

http://www.greatsite.com/timeline-english-bible-history/noah-webster.html


Thank you for the link. I have a variety of different Bibles. including a 1611 KJV. But do not have a Webster Version.
No. 9     Reply: Re: Re: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 4:23 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Verbatim wrote:

Who is Noah Webster

Noah Webster’s Bible

While Webster’s association with the dictionary is common knowledge, it is not so widely known that Noah Webster produced his own modern English translation of the Bible in 1833.

Though an excellent and highly accurate translation, Webster’s Bible was not widely accepted, due to the continued popularity of the ancient King James version. It was, however, the most significant English language translation of the scriptures to be done since the King James version of more than 200 years earlier.

The “Webster Version” of the Bible has actually enjoyed a recent increase in popularity in electronic and “online” formats (such as is available at WWW.BIBLES.NET and other Biblical resource websites) because it is one of few modern English translations of the scriptures which may be freely used without paying any royalty, as its age makes it public domain material.


Read more about Noah Webster at:

http://www.greatsite.com/timeline-english-bible-history/noah-webster.html


Thank you for the link. I have a variety of different Bibles. including a 1611 KJV. But do not have a Webster Version.




O, you are welcome
No. 10     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 2, 2017 at 7:06 PM     
Repentance

REPENT'ANCE, noun

1. Sorrow for any thing done or said; the pain or grief which a person experiences in consequence of the injury or inconvenience produced by his own conduct.

2. In theology, the pain, regret or affliction which a person feels on account of his past conduct, because it exposes him to punishment. This sorrow proceeding merely from the fear of punishment, is called legal repentance as being excited by the terrors of legal penalties, and it may exist without an amendment of life.

3. Real penitence; sorrow or deep contrition for sin, as an offense and dishonor to God, a violation of his holy law, and the basest ingratitude towards a Being of infinite benevolence. This is called evangelical repentance and is accompanied and followed by amendment of life.

Repentance is a change of mind, or a conversion from sin to God.

Godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation. 2 Corinthians 7:9. Matthew 3:8.

Repentance is the relinquishment of any practice, from conviction that it has offended God.
No. 11     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 7:17 AM     
Disciple

DISCIPLE, noun [Latin , to learn.]

1. A learner; a scholar; one who receives or professes to receive instruction from another; as the disciples of Plato.

2. A follower; an adherent to the doctrines of another. Hence the constant attendants of Christ were called his disciples; and hence all Christians are called his disciples, as they profess to learn and receive his doctrines and precepts.

DISCIPLE, verb transitive

1. To teach; to train, or bring up.

2. To make disciples of; to convert to doctrines or principles.

This authority he employed in sending missionaries to disciple all nations.

3. To punish; to discipline. [Not in use.]
No. 12     Reply: Easton's Bible Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 7:21 AM     
Disciple...double entry, and post# 11

A scholar, sometimes applied to the followers of John the Baptist (Matthew 9:14), and of the Pharisees (22:16), but principally to the followers of Christ.
A disciple of Christ is one who (1) believes his doctrine, (2) rests on his sacrifice, (3) imbibes his spirit, and (4) imitates his example (Matthew 10:24; Luke 14:26, 27, 33; John 6:69).
No. 13     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 7:24 AM     
Faith

FAITH, noun [Latin fides, fido, to trust; Gr. to persuade, to draw towards any thing, to conciliate; to believe, to obey. In the Greek Lexicon of Hederic it is said, the primitive signification of the verb is to bind and draw or lead, as signifies a rope or cable. But this remark is a little incorrect. The sense of the verb, from which that of rope and binding is derived, is to strain, to draw, and thus to bind or make fast. A rope or cable is that which makes fast. Heb.]

1. Belief; the assent of the mind to the truth of what is declared by another, resting on his authority and veracity, without other evidence; the judgment that what another states or testifies is the truth. I have strong faith or no faith in the testimony of a witness, or in what a historian narrates.

2. The assent of the mind to the truth of a proposition advanced by another; belief, or probable evidence of any kind.

3. In theology, the assent of the mind or understanding to the truth of what God has revealed. Simple belief of the scriptures, of the being and perfections of God, and of the existence, character and doctrines of Christ, founded on the testimony of the sacred writers, is called historical or speculative faith; a faith little distinguished from the belief of the existence and achievements of Alexander or of Cesar.

4. Evangelical, justifying, or saving faith is the assent of the mind to the truth of divine revelation, on the authority of God's testimony, accompanied with a cordial assent of the will or approbation of the heart; an entire confidence or trust in God's character and declarations, and in the character and doctrines of Christ, with an unreserved surrender of the will to his guidance, and dependence on his merits for salvation. In other words, that firm belief of God's testimony, and of the truth of the gospel, which influences the will, and leads to an entire reliance on Christ for salvation.

Being justified by faith Romans 5:1.

Without faith it is impossible to please God. Hebrews 11:1.

For we walk by faith and not by sight. 2 Corinthians 5:7.

With the heart man believeth to righteousness. Romans 10:6.

The faith of the gospel is that emotion of the mind, which is called trust or confidence, exercised towards the moral character of God, and particularly of the Savior.

FAITH is an affectionate practical confidence in the testimony of God.

FAITH is an affectionate practical confidence in the testimony of God.

FAITH is a firm, cordial belief in the veracity of God, in all the declarations of his word; or a full and affectionate confidence in the certainty of those things which God has declared, and because he has declared them.

5. The object of belief; a doctrine or system of doctrines believed; a system of revealed truths received by christians.

They heard only, that he who persecuted us in times past, now preacheth the faith which once he destroyed. Galatians 1:23.

6. The promises of God, or his truth and faithfulness.

shall their unbelief make the faith of God without effect? Rom 3.

7. An open profession of gospel truth.

Your faith is spoken of throughout the whole world. Rom 1.

8. A persuasion or belief of the lawfulness of things indifferent.

Hast thou faith? Have it to thyself before God. Rom 14.

9. Faithfulness; fidelity; a strict adherence to duty and fulfillment of promises.

Her failing, while her faith to me remains, I would conceal.

Children in whom is no faith Deuteronomy 32:20.

10. Word or honor pledged; promise given; fidelity. He violated his plighted faith

For you alone I broke my faith with injured Palamon.

11. Sincerity; honesty; veracity; faithfulness. We ought in good faith to fulfill all our engagements.

12. Credibility or truth. Unusual.]

The faith of the foregoing narrative.
No. 14     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 7:30 AM     
Information is good ...

Transformation is better ... :2thumbs:

That's when information makes sense ... :cloud9:
No. 15     Reply: Re: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 8:38 AM     
RadioPreacherMan wrote:

Information is good ...

Transformation is better ... :2thumbs:

That's when information makes sense ... :cloud9:



Well...with hope and prayer those who are not transformed by the renewing of the mind, seek repentance and trust in Lord Jesus Christ..with not pretense, but with full surrender.


NOTE:
The Wheat and the Tares
The Sheep and the Goats
The Ten Virgins
The Good and Bad Figs
......and so on,

also...Lydia
and Simon Magus,

The Parable of the Shower.
No. 16     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 8:48 AM     
Worthy

WORTHY, adjective [G.]

1. Deserving; such as merits; having worth or excellence; equivalent; with of, before the thing deserved. She has married a man worthy of her.

Thou art worthy of the sway.

I am not worthy of the least of all the mercies--Genesis 32:10.

2. Possessing worth or excellence of qualities; virtuous; estimable; as a worthy citizen; a worthy magistrate.

Happier thou mayst be, worthier canst not be.

This worthy mind should worthy things embrace.

3. Suitable; having qualities suited to; either in a good or bad sense; equal in value; as flowers worthy of paradise.

4. Suitable to any thing bad.

The merciless Macdonald, worthy to be a rebel.

5. Deserving of ill; as things worthy of stripes. Luke 12:48.

WORTHY, noun A man of eminent worth; a man distinguished for useful and estimable qualities; a man of valor; a word much used in the plural; as the worthies of the church; political worthies; military worthies.

WORTHY, verb transitive To render worthy; to exalt. [Not in use.]
No. 17     Reply: Re: Re: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 9:47 AM     
Verbatim wrote:

Well...with hope and prayer those who are not transformed by the renewing of the mind, seek repentance and trust in Lord Jesus Christ ...



Worth Repeating ... Amen !
No. 18     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 11:54 AM     
Discern

DISCERN, verb transitive s as z. [Latin , to separate or distinguish, Gr.]

1. To separate by the eye, or by the understanding. Hence,

2. To distinguish; to see the difference between two or more things; to discriminate; as, to discern the blossom-buds from the leaf-buds of plants.

DISCERN thou what is thine--Genesis 31:32.

3. To make the difference.

For nothing else discerns the virtue or the vice.

4. To discover; to see; to distinguish by the eye.

I discerned among the youths, a young man void of understanding. Proverbs 7:7.

5. To discover by the intellect; to distinguish; hence, to have knowledge of; to judge.

So is my lord the king to discern good and bad. 2 Samuel 14:17.

A wise mans heart discerneth time and judgment. Ecclesiastes 8:5.

DISCERN, verb intransitive

1. To see or understand the difference; to make distinction; as, to discern between good and evil, truth and falsehood.

2. To have judicial cognizance.
No. 19     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 11:57 AM     
Discernment

DISCERNMENT, noun The act of discerning; also, the power or faculty of the mind, by which it distinguishes one thing from another, as truth from falsehood, virtue from vice; acuteness of judgment; power of perceiving differences of things or ideas, and their relations and tendencies. The errors of youth often proceed from the want of discernment
No. 20     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 12:05 PM     
Wise

WISE, adjective s as z. [G., to know., Latin ]

1. Properly, having knowledge; hence, having the power of discerning and judging correctly, or of discriminating between what is true and what is false; between what is fit and proper, and what is improper; as a wise prince; a wise magistrate. Solomon was deemed the wisest man. But a man may be speculatively and not practically wise Hence,

2. Discrete and judicious in the use or applications of knowledge; choosing laudable ends, and the best means to accomplish them. This is to be practically wise Genesis 41:8.

3. Skillful; dextrous.

They are wise to do evil, but to do good they have no knowledge. Jeremiah 4:22.

4. Learned; knowing; as the wise and the unwise. Romans 1:14.

5. Skilled in arts, science, philosophy, or in magic and divination. 2 Samuel 14:2.

6. Godly; pious. Proverbs 13:1.

--The holy Scriptures, which are able to make thee wise to salvation. 2 Timothy 3:15.

7. Skilled in hidden arts; a sense somewhat ironical; as the wise woman of Brainford.

8.Dictated or guided by wisdom; containing wisdom; judicious; well adapted to produce good effects; applicable to things; as a wise saying; a wise scheme or plan; wise conduct or management; a wise determination.

9. Becoming a wise man; grave; discrete; as wise deportment.

WISE, noun s as z. [G.] Manner; way of being or acting.

This song she sings in most commanding wise

In fittest wise

In the foregoing form, this word is obsolete, the use of it is now very limited. It is common in the following phrases.

1. In any wise

If he that sanctified the field will in any wise redeem it-- Leviticus 27:19.

Fret not thyself in any wise Psalms 37:8.

2. On this wise

On this wise ye shall bless the children of Israel. Numbers 6:23.

3. In no wise He shall in no wise lose his reward. Matthew 10:16.

It is used in composition, as in likewise, otherwise, lengthwise, etc. By mistake, ways is often used for it; as lengthways, for lengthwise.
No. 21     Reply: Internation Standard Bible Encyclopedia   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 3, 2017 at 12:11 PM     
Disorderly...double entry- and post # 6

dis-or'-der-li (ataktos): The word is found four times in the Epistles to the Thess (1Th 5:14; 2Th 3:6-7,11), "Withdraw yourselves from every brother that walketh disorderly."; "We behaved not ourselves disorderly."; "We hear of some that walk among you disorderly."

The word is a military term and has reference to the soldier who does not keep the ranks (inordinatus, Liv). Then it refers to people who refuse to obey the civil laws, and thus it gets its meaning, "disorderly." It points to members in the early church, who, by their lives, became a reproach to the gospel of Christ (compare 1Th 4:11-12).
No. 22     Reply: Easton's Bible Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 4, 2017 at 6:54 AM     
Redemption

The purchase back of something that had been lost, by the payment of a ransom. The Greek word so rendered is apolutrosis, a word occurring nine times in Scripture, and always with the idea of a ransom or price paid, i.e., redemption by a lutron (see Matthew 20:28; Mark 10:45).

There are instances in the LXX. Version of the Old Testament of the use of lutron in man's relation to man (Leviticus 19:20; 25:51; Exodus 21:30; Numbers 35:31, 32; Isaiah 45:13; Proverbs 6:35), and in the same sense of man's relation to God (Numbers 3:49; 18:15).

There are many passages in the New Testament which represent Christ's sufferings under the idea of a ransom or price, and the result thereby secured is a purchase or redemption (comp. Acts 20:28; 1 Corinthians 6:19, 20; Galatians 3:13; 4:4, 5; Ephesians 1:7; Colossians 1:14; 1 Timothy 2:5, 6; Titus 2:14; Hebrews 9:12; 1 Peter 1:18, 19; Revelation 5:9).

The idea running through all these texts, however various their reference, is that of payment made for our redemption. The debt against us is not viewed as simply cancelled, but is fully paid. Christ's blood or life, which he surrendered for them, is the "ransom" by which the deliverance of his people from the servitude of sin and from its penal consequences is secured.

It is the plain doctrine of Scripture that "Christ saves us neither by the mere exercise of power, nor by his doctrine, nor by his example, nor by the moral influence which he exerted, nor by any subjective influence on his people, whether natural or mystical, but as a satisfaction to divine justice, as an expiation for sin, and as a ransom from the curse and authority of the law, thus reconciling us to God by making it consistent with his perfection to exercise mercy toward sinners" (Hodge's Systematic Theology).
No. 23     Reply: Easton's Bible Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 4, 2017 at 6:58 AM     
Justification

A forensic term, opposed to condemnation. As regards its nature, it is the judicial act of God, by which he pardons all the sins of those who believe in Christ, and accounts, accepts, and treats them as righteous in the eye of the law, i.e., as conformed to all its demands.

In addition to the pardon (q.v.) of sin, justification declares that all the claims of the law are satisfied in respect of the justified. It is the act of a judge and not of a sovereign. The law is not relaxed or set aside, but is declared to be fulfilled in the strictest sense; and so the person justified is declared to be entitled to all the advantages and rewards arising from perfect obedience to the law (Romans 5:1-10).

It proceeds on the imputing or crediting to the believer by God himself of the perfect righteousness, active and passive, of his Representative and Surety, Jesus Christ (Romans 10:3-9). Justification is not the forgiveness of a man without righteousness, but a declaration that he possesses a righteousness which perfectly and for ever satisfies the law, namely, Christ's righteousness (2 Corinthians 5:21; Romans 4:6-8 ).

The sole condition on which this righteousness is imputed or credited to the believer is faith in or on the Lord Jesus Christ. Faith is called a "condition," not because it possesses any merit, but only because it is the instrument, the only instrument by which the soul appropriates or apprehends Christ and his righteousness (Romans 1:17; 3:25, 26; 4:20, 22; Philippians 3:8-11; Galatians 2:16).

The act of faith which thus secures our justification secures also at the same time our sanctification (q.v.); and thus the doctrine of justification by faith does not lead to licentiousness (Romans 6:2-7). Good works, while not the ground, are the certain consequence of justification (6:14; 7:6). (See GALATIANS, EPISTLE TO.)
No. 24     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 4, 2017 at 7:07 AM     
Peace

PEACE, noun [Latin pax, paco, to appease.]

1. In a general sense, a state of quiet or tranquillity; freedom from disturbance or agitation; applicable to society, to individuals, or to the temper of the mind.

2. Freedom from war with a foreign nation; public quiet.

3. Freedom from internal commotion or civil war.

4. Freedom from private quarrels, suits or disturbance.

5. Freedom from agitation or disturbance by the passions, as from fear, terror, anger, anxiety or the like; quietness of mind; tranquillity; calmness; quiet of conscience.

Great peace have they that love the law. Psalms 119:165.

6. Heavenly rest; the happiness of heaven.

7. Harmony; concord; a state of reconciliation between parties at variance.

8. Public tranquillity; that quiet, order and security which is guaranteed by the laws; as, to keep the peace; to break the peace

This word is used in commanding silence or quiet; as, peace to this troubled soul.

PEACE, the lovers are asleep.

To be at peace to be reconciled; to live in harmony.

To make peace to reconcile, as parties at variance.

To hold the peace to be silent; to suppress one's thoughts; not to speak.
No. 25     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 4, 2017 at 8:49 AM     
Patience

PATIENCE, noun pa'shens. [Latin patientia, from patior, to suffer.]

1. The suffering of afflictions, pain, toil, calamity, provocation or other evil, with a calm, unruffled temper; endurance without murmuring or fretfulness. patience may spring from constitutional fortitude, from a kind of heroic pride, or from christian submission to the divine will.

2. A calm temper which bears evils without murmuring or discontent.

3. The act or quality of waiting long for justice or expected good without discontent.

Have patience with me, and I will pay thee all. Matthew 18:26.

4. Perseverance; constancy in labor or exertion.

He learnt with patience and with meekness taught.

5. The quality of bearing offenses and injuries without anger or revenge.

His rage was kindled and his patience gone.

6. Sufferance; permission. [Not used.]

7. A plant, a species of rumex of dock.
No. 26     Reply: Naves Topical Index   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 5, 2017 at 7:13 AM     
Jesting, Foolish

Forbidden
Ephesians 5:4; Matthew 12:36
No. 27     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 5, 2017 at 7:16 AM     
Jesting...second entry and post #26

JEST'ING, participle present tense Joking; talking for diversion or merriment.

JEST'ING, noun A joking; concise wit; wit that consists in a trope or verbal figure, in a metaphorical sense of words, or in a double sense of the same word, or in similitude of sound in different words.
No. 28     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 5, 2017 at 7:33 AM     
Oracle

ORACLE,

OR'ACLE, noun [Latin oraculum, from oro, to utter.]

1. Among pagans, the answer of a god or some person reputed to be a god, to an inquiry made respecting some affair of importance, usually respecting some future event, as the success of an enterprise or battle.

2. The deity who gave or was supposed to give answers to inquiries; as the Delphic oracle.

3. The place where the answers were given.

4. Among christians, oracles, in the plural, denotes the communications, revelations or messages delivered by God to prophets. In this sense it is rarely used in the singular; but we say, the oracles of God, divine oracles, meaning the Scriptures.

5. The sanctuary or most holy place in the temple, in which was deposited the ark of the covenant. 1 Kings 6:1.

6. Any person or place where certain decisions are obtained.

7. Any person reputed uncommonly wise, whose determinations are not disputed, or whose opinions are of great authority.

8. A wise sentence or decision of great authority.

OR'ACLE, verb intransitive To utter oracles.
No. 29     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 5, 2017 at 7:42 AM     
Flattery

FLAT'TERY, noun

1. False praise; commendation bestowed for the purpose of gaining favor and influence, or to accomplish some purpose. Direct flattery consists in praising a person himself; indirect flattery consists in praising a person through his works or his connections.

Simple pride for flattery makes demands.

Just praise is only a debt, but flattery is a present.

2. Adulation; obsequiousness; wheedling.

3. Just commendation which gratifies self-love.
No. 30     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 5, 2017 at 7:51 AM     
God created you to be in perfect relationship with Him, but your sins fracture that relationship and separate you from Him. You can only be forgiven and reconciled back to God through a relationship with His Son, Jesus Christ.

Learn more about what He has done for you and how He wants to be part of your life.

Matthew 11.28-30
Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.

For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.
No. 31     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 5, 2017 at 8:08 AM     
Righteousness

RIGHTEOUSNESS, noun ri'chusness.

1. Purity of heart and rectitude of life; conformity of heart and life to the divine law. righteousness as used in Scripture and theology, in which it is chiefly used, is nearly equivalent to holiness, comprehending holy principles and affections of heart, and conformity of life to the divine law. It includes all we call justice, honesty and virtue, with holy affections; in short, it is true religion.

2. Applied to God, the perfection or holiness of his nature; exact rectitude; faithfulness.

3. The active and passive obedience of Christ, by which the law of God is fulfilled. Daniel 9:7.

4. Justice; equity between man and man. Luke 1:75.

5. The cause of our justification.

The Lord our righteousness Jeremiah 23:6.
No. 32     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 5, 2017 at 8:34 AM     
Reconcile

RECONCI'LE, verb transitive [Latin reconcilio; re and concilio; con and calo, to call, Gr. The literal sense is to call back into union.]

1. To conciliate anew; to call back into union and friendship the affections which have been alienated; to restore to friendship or favor after estrangement; as, to reconcile men or parties that have been at variance.

Go thy way; first be reconciled to thy brother - Matthew 5:24.

We pray you in Christ's stead, be ye reconciled to God.

2 Corinthians 5:18. Ephesians 2:16. Colossians 1:20.

2. To bring to acquiescence, content or quiet submission; with to; as, to reconcile one's self to afflictions. It is our duty to be reconciled to the dispensations of Providence.

3. To make consistent or congruous; to bring to agreement or suitableness; followed by with or to.

The great men among the ancients understood how to reconcile manual labor with affairs of state.

Some figures monstrous and misshap'd appear, considered singly, or beheld too near; which but proportion'd to their light and place, due distance reconciles to form and grace.

4. To adjust; to settle; as, to reconcile differences or quarrels.
No. 33     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Nov 5, 2017 at 8:51 AM     
Hope you don't mind Verbatim ... but this " one-liner " came to me ...

Don't let the friendship you THINK you may have with others ...

Get in the way of the Friendship you CAN have with Jesus Christ.




No. 34     Reply: Re: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 5, 2017 at 9:33 AM     
RadioPreacherMan wrote:

Hope you don't mind Verbatim ... but this " one-liner " came to me ...

Don't let the friendship you THINK you may have with others ...

Get in the way of the Friendship you CAN have with Jesus Christ.








Good and godly addition...thanks be to God :thumb_up:
No. 35     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Nov 5, 2017 at 10:33 AM     

A good one liner there, RPM!

(adding my own two liner: there is a difference between friendship and fellowship. Friendships from fellowship are indeed blessed from above and is everlasting (Spiritual family).

No. 36     Reply: From: myself   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 6, 2017 at 7:20 AM     
Fellowship

Biblical fel'-o-ship= "spiritual togetherness", working together for the common good, serving God together "in the spirit" sharenping the iron as a craftsman.

Love and acceptance in a common bond...Ephesians 3.
Show love and hospitality towards others...Hebrews 13.1-2 and 13.14-16.

Together for spiritual purposes:
for sharing needs
for prayer
discussing God's word
encourage
comfort
edifying one another

I John 1.3
That which we have seen and heard declare we unto you, that ye also may have fellowship with us: and truly our fellowship is with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ.


No. 37     Reply: Easton's Bible Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 6, 2017 at 7:39 AM     
Temptation

1. Trial; a being put to the test. Thus God "tempted [Genesis 22:1; R.V., did prove'] Abraham;" and afflictions are said to tempt, i.e., to try, men (James 1:2, 12; comp. Deuteronomy 8:2), putting their faith and patience to the test.

2. Ordinarily, however, the word means solicitation to that which is evil, and hence Satan is called "the tempter" (Matthew 4:3). Our Lord was in this way tempted in the wilderness. That temptation was not internal, but by a real, active, subtle being. It was not self-sought. It was submitted to as an act of obedience on his part. "Christ was led, driven. An unseen personal force bore him a certain violence is implied in the words" (Matthew 4:1-11).

The scene of the temptation of our Lord is generally supposed to have been the mountain of Quarantania (q.v.), "a high and precipitous wall of rock, 1,200 or 1,500 feet above the plain west of Jordan, near Jericho."

Temptation is common to all (Daniel 12:10; Zechariah 13:9; Psalms 66:10; Luke 22:31, 40; Hebrews 11:17; James 1:12; 1 Peter 1:7; 4:12). We read of the temptation of Joseph (Genesis 39), of David (2 Samuel 24; 1 Chronicles 21), of Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 32:31), of Daniel (Daniel 6), etc. So long as we are in this world we are exposed to temptations, and need ever to be on our watch against them.
No. 38     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 6, 2017 at 7:50 AM     
Covenant

COVENANT, noun [L, to come; a coming together; a meeting or agreement of minds.]

1. A mutual consent or agreement of two or more persons, to do or to forbear some act or thing; a contract; stipulation. A covenant is created by deed in writing, sealed and executed; or it may be implied in the contract.

2. A writing containing the terms of agreement or contract between parties; or the clause of agreement in a deed containing the covenant

3. In theology, the covenant of works, is that implied in the commands, prohibitions, and promises of God; the promise of God to man, that mans perfect obedience should entitle him to happiness. This do, and live; that do, and die.

The covenant of redemption, is the mutual agreement between the Father and Son, respecting the redemption of sinners by Christ.

The covenant of grace, is that by which God engages to bestow salvation on man, upon the condition that man shall believe in Christ and yield obedience to the terms of the gospel.

4. In church affairs, toa solemn agreement between the members of a church, that they will walk together according to the precepts of the gospel, in brotherly affection.

COVENANT, verb intransitive To enter into a formal agreement; to stipulate; to bind ones self by contract. A covenants with B to convey to him a certain estate. When the terms are expressed ti has for before the thing or price.

They covenanted with him for thirty pieces of silver. Matthew 26:15.

COVENANT, verb transitive To grant or promise by covenant
No. 39     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 6, 2017 at 8:06 AM     
Hope

HOPE, noun [Latin cupio.]

1. A desire of some good, accompanied with at least a slight expectation of obtaining it, or a belief that it is obtainable. hope differs from wish and desire in this, that it implies some expectation of obtaining the good desired, or the possibility of possessing it. hope therefore always gives pleasure or joy; whereas wish and desire may produce or be accompanied with pain and anxiety.

The hypocrite's hope shall perish. Job 8:13.

He wish'ed, but not with hope--

Sweet hope! kind cheat!

He that lives upon hope will die fasting.

2. Confidence in a future event; the highest degree of well founded expectation of good; as a hope founded on God's gracious promises; a scriptural sense.

A well founded scriptural hope is, in our religion, the source of ineffable happiness.

3. That which gives hope; he or that which furnishes ground of expectation, or promises desired good. The hope of Israel is the Messiah.

The Lord will be the hope of his people. Joel 3:16.

4. An opinion or belief not amounting to certainty, but grounded on substantial evidence. The christian indulges a hope that his sins are pardoned.

HOPE, verb intransitive

1. To cherish a desire of food, with some expectation of obtaining it, or a belief that it is obtainable.

HOPE for good success.

Be sober and hope to the end. 1 Peter 1:3.

HOPE humbly then, with trembling pinions soar.

2. To place confidence in; to trust in with confident expectation of good.

Why art thou cast down, O my soul, and why art thou disquieted within me? hope thou in God. Psalms 43:5.

HOPE, verb transitive To desire with expectation of good, or a belief that it may be obtained. But as a transitive verb, it is seldom used, and the phrases in which it is so used are elliptical, for being understood.

So stands the Thracian herdsman with his spear,

Full in the gap, and hopes the hunted bear.

HOPE, noun A sloping plain between ridges of mountains. [Not in use.]
No. 40     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 6, 2017 at 8:14 AM     
Deceived

DECE'IVED, participle passive Misled; led into error; beguiled; cheated; deluded.
No. 41     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 6, 2017 at 8:17 AM     
Deception

DECEP'TION, noun

1. The act of deceiving or misleading.

All deception is a misapplication of the established signs used to communicate thoughts.

2. The state of being deceived or misled. Incautious and inexperienced youth is peculiarly exposed to deception

3. Artifice practiced; cheat; as, a scheme is alla deception
No. 42     Reply: Christian Theology- Systematic and Biblical   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 6, 2017 at 9:22 AM     
Election

Definition:
Election is that eternal act of God by which, in His sovereign pleasure and on account of no forseen merit in them.

He chooses certain, out of a number of sinful men, to be the recipients of the special grace of His Spirit and so to be made voluntary partakers of Lord Jesus' salvation.
No. 43     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 7, 2017 at 7:55 AM     
Sanctify

SANC'TIFY, verb transitive [Low Latin sanctifico; from sanctus, holy, and facio, to make.]

1. In a general sense, to cleanse, purify or make holy.

2. To separate, set apart or appoint to a holy, sacred or religious use.

God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it. Genesis 2:3.

So under the Jewish dispensation, to sanctify the altar, the temple, the priests, etc.

3. To purify; to prepare for divine service, and for partaking of holy things. Exodus 19:10.

4. To separate, ordain and appoint to the work of redemption and the government of the church. John 10:36.

5. To cleanse from corruption; to purify from sin; to make holy be detaching the affections from the world and its defilements, and exalting them to a supreme love to God.

Sanctify them through thy truth; thy word is truth.

John 17:17. Ephesians 5:26.

6. To make the means of holiness; to render productive of holiness or piety.

Those judgments of God are the more welcome, as a means which his mercy hath sanctified so to me, as to make me repent of that unjust act.

7. To make free from guilt.

That holy man amaz'd at what he saw, made haste to sanctify the bliss by law.

8. To secure from violation.

Truth guards the poet, sanctifies the line.

To sanctify God, to praise and celebrate him as a holy being; to acknowledge and honor his holy majesty, and to reverence his character and laws. Isaiah 8:13.

God sanctifies himself or his name, by vindicating his honor from the reproaches of the wicked, and manifesting his glory. Ezekiel 36:23.
No. 44     Reply: Easton's Bible Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 7, 2017 at 8:01 AM     
Sanctification

Involves more than a mere moral reformation of character, brought about by the power of the truth- it is the work of the Holy Spirit bringing the whole nature more and more under the influences of the new gracious principles implanted in the soul in regeneration.

In other words, sanctification is the carrying on to perfection the work begun in regeneration, and it extends to the whole man (Romans 6:13; 2 Corinthians 4:6; Colossians 3:10; 1 John 4:7; 1 Corinthians 6:19). It is the special office of the Holy Spirit in the plan of redemption to carry on this work (1 Corinthians 6:11; 2 Thessalonians 2:13).

Faith is instrumental in securing sanctification, inasmuch as it (1) secures union to Christ (Galatians 2:20), and (2) brings the believer into living contact with the truth, whereby he is led to yield obedience "to the commands, trembling at the threatenings, and embracing the promises of God for this life and that which is to come."

Perfect sanctification is not attainable in this life (1 Kings 8:46; Proverbs 20:9; Ecclesiastes 7:20; James 3:2; 1 John 1:8 ). See Paul's account of himself in Romans 7:14-25; Philippians 3:12-14; and 1 Timothy 1:15; also the confessions of David (Psalms 19:12, 13; 51), of Moses (90:8 ), of Job (42:5, 6), and of Daniel (9:3-20).

"The more holy a man is, the more humble, self-renouncing, self-abhorring, and the more sensitive to every sin he becomes, and the more closely he clings to Christ. The moral imperfections which cling to him he feels to be sins, which he laments and strives to overcome.

Believers find that their life is a constant warfare, and they need to take the kingdom of heaven by storm, and watch while they pray. They are always subject to the constant chastisement of their Father's loving hand, which can only be designed to correct their imperfections and to confirm their graces. And it has been notoriously the fact that the best Christians have been those who have been the least prone to claim the attainment of perfection for themselves.", Hodge's Outlines.
No. 45     Reply: Westminster Confession of Faith   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 7, 2017 at 8:57 AM     
Of The Law Of God


I. God gave to Adam a law, as a covenant of works, by which He bound him and all his posterity, to personal, entire, exact, and perpetual obedience, promised life upon the fulfilling, and threatened death upon the breach of it, and endued him with power and ability to keep it.

II. This law, after his fall, continued to be a perfect rule of righteousness; and, as such, was delivered by God upon Mount Sinai, in ten commandments, and written in two tables: the first four commandments containing our duty towards God; and the other six, our duty to man.

III. Besides this law, commonly called moral, God was pleased to give to the people of Israel, as a church under age, ceremonial laws, containing several typical ordinances, partly of worship, prefiguring Christ, His graces, actions, sufferings, and benefits; and partly, holding forth divers instructions of moral duties. All which ceremonial laws are now abrogated, under the New Testament.

IV. To them also, as a body politic, He gave sundry judicial laws, which expired together with the State of that people; not obliging under any now, further than the general equity thereof may require.

V. The moral law does forever bind all, as well justified persons as others, to the obedience thereof; and that, not only in regard of the matter contained in it, but also in respect of the authority of God the Creator, who gave it.Neither does Christ, in the Gospel, any way dissolve, but much strengthen this obligation.
No. 46     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 7, 2017 at 2:44 PM     
Bicker

BICK'ER, verb intransitive

1. To skirmish; to fight off and on; that is, to make repeated attacks. [But in this sense I believe rarely used.]

2. To quarrel; to contend in words; to scold; to contend in petulant altercation. [This is the usual signification.]

3. To move quickly; to quiver; to be tremulous, like flame or water; as the bickering flame; the bickering stream.
No. 47     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 7, 2017 at 2:46 PM     
Bickerer

BICK'ERER, noun One who bickers, or engages in a petty quarrel.
No. 48     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 7, 2017 at 2:48 PM     
Bickering

BICK'ERING, participle present tense Quarreling; contending; quivering.
No. 49     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 7, 2017 at 2:54 PM     
Contend

CONTEND, verb intransitive [Latin , to stretch. Gr., See Tend, Tenet.]

1. To strive, or to strive against; to struggle in opposition.

Distress not the Moabites, nor contend with them in battle. Deuteronomy 2:9.

2. To strive; to use earnest efforts to obtain, or to defend and preserve.

You sit above, and see vain men below contend for what you only can bestow.

Ye should earnestly contend for the faith once delivered to the saints. Jude 1:3.

3. To dispute earnestly; to strive in debate.

They that were of the circumcision contended with him. Acts 11:2. Job 9:3.

4. To reprove sharply; to chide; to strive to convince and reclaim.

Then contended I with the rulers. Nehemiah 13:11.

5.To strive in opposition; to punish.

The Lord God called to contend by fire. Amos 7:4.

6. To quarrel; to dispute fiercely; to wrangle. The parties contend about trifles.

To contend for, to strive to obtain; as, two competitors contend for the prize.

CONTEND, verb transitive To dispute; to contest.

When Carthage shall contend the world with Rome.

This transitive use of contend is not strictly legitimate. The phrase is elliptical, for being understood after contend; but it is admissible in poetry.
No. 50     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 8, 2017 at 7:05 AM     
Content

CONTENT, adjective [Latin , to be held; to hold.] Literally, held, contained within limits; hence, quiet; not disturbed; having a mind at peace; easy; satisfied, so as not to repine, object, or oppose.

CONTENT with science in the vale of peace.

Having food and raiment, let us be therewith content 1 Timothy 6:8.

CONTENT, verb transitive

1. To satisfy the mind; to make quiet, so as to stop complaint or opposition; to appease; to make easy in any situation; used chiefly with the reciprocal pronoun.

Do not content yourselves with obscure and confused ideas, where clearer are to be obtained.

Pilate, willing to content the people, released Barabbas. Mark 15:15.

2. To please or gratify.

It doth much content me, to hear him so inclined.

CONTENT, noun

1. Rest or quietness of the mind in the present condition; satisfaction which holds the mind in peace, restraining complaint, opposition, or further desire, and often implying a moderate degree of happiness.

A wise content his even soul securd; By want not shaken, nor by wealth allurd.

2. Acquiescence; satisfaction without examination.

The style is excellent; the sense they humbly take upon content

3. The term used in the House of Lords in England, to express an assent to a bill or motion.

CONTENT, noun

1. Often in the plural, contents. That which is contained; the thing or things held, included or comprehended within a limit or line; as the contents of a cask or bale; of a room or a ship; the contents of a book or writing.

2. In geometry, the area or quantity of matter or space included in certain lines.

3. The power of containing; capacity; extent within limits; as a ship of great content

[But in this sense the plural is generally used.]
No. 51     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 8, 2017 at 7:12 AM     
Mercy

MER'CY, noun [Latin misericordia.]

1. That benevolence, mildness or tenderness of heart which disposes a person to overlook injuries, or to treat an offender better than he deserves; the disposition that tempers justice, and induces an injured person to forgive trespasses and injuries, and to forbear punishment, or inflict less than law or justice will warrant. In this sense, there is perhaps no word in our language precisely synonymous with mercy That which comes nearest to it is grace. It implies benevolence, tenderness, mildness, pity or compassion, and clemency, but exercised only towards offenders. mercy is a distinguishing attribute of the Supreme Being.

The Lord is long-suffering and of great mercy forgiving iniquity and transgression, and by no means clearing the guilty. Numbers 14:18.

2. An act or exercise of mercy or favor. It is a mercy that they escaped.

I am not worthy of the least of all thy mercies. Genesis 32:1.

3. Pity; compassion manifested towards a person in distress.

And he said, he that showed mercy on him. Luke 10:37.

4. Clemency and bounty.

Mercy and truth preserve the king; and his throne is upheld by mercy Proverbs 28:13.

5. Charity, or the duties of charity and benevolence.

I will have mercy and not sacrifice. Matthew 9:13.

6. Grace; favor. 1 Corinthians 7:25. Jude 1:2.

7. Eternal life, the fruit of mercy 2 Timothy 1:2.

8. Pardon.

I cry thee mercy with all my heart.

9. The act of sparing, or the forbearance of a violent act expected. The prisoner cried for mercy

To be or to lie at the mercy of, to have no means of self-defense, but to be dependent for safety on the mercy or compassion of another, or in the power of that which is irresistible; as, to be at the mercy of a foe, or of the waves.
No. 52     Reply: Easton's Bible Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 8, 2017 at 8:18 AM     
Bless

1. God blesses his people when he bestows on them some gift temporal or spiritual (Genesis 1:22; 24:35; Job 42:12; Psalms 45:2; 104:24, 35).

2. We bless God when we thank him for his mercies (Psalms 103:1, 2; 145:1, 2).

3. A man blesses himself when he invokes God's blessing (Isaiah 65:16), or rejoices in God's goodness to him (Deuteronomy 29:19; Psalms 49:18 ).

4. One blesses another when he expresses good wishes or offers prayer to God for his welfare (Genesis 24:60; 31:55; 1 Samuel 2:20). Sometimes blessings were uttered under divine inspiration, as in the case of Noah, Isaac, Jacob, and Moses (Genesis 9:26, 27; 27:28, 29, 40; 48:15-20; 49:1-28; Deuteronomy 33). The priests were divinely authorized to bless the people (Deuteronomy 10:8; Numbers 6:22-27). We have many examples of apostolic benediction (2 Corinthians 13:14; Ephesians 6:23, 24; 2 Thessalonians 3:16, 18; Hebrews 13:20, 21; 1 Peter 5:10, 11).

5. Among the Jews in their thank-offerings the master of the feast took a cup of wine in his hand, and after having blessed God for it and for other mercies then enjoyed, handed it to his guests, who all partook of it. Psalms 116:13 refers to this custom. It is also alluded to in 1 Corinthians 10:16, where the apostle speaks of the "cup of blessing."
No. 53     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 8, 2017 at 8:23 AM     
Bless second entry...and post #52

BLESS, verb transitive preterit tense and participle present tense blessed or blest.

1. To pronounce a wish of happiness to one; to express a wish or desire of happiness.

And Isaac called Jacob and blessed him. Genesis 28:3.

2. To make happy; to make successful; to prosper in temporal concerns; as, we are blest with peace and plenty.

The Lord thy God shall bless thee in all thou doest. Deuteronomy 15:4.

3. To make happy in a future life.

BLESSed are the dead who die in the Lord. Revelation 14:13.

4. To set apart or consecrate to holy purposes; to make and pronounce holy.

And God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it. Genesis 2:3

5. To consecrate by prayer; to invoke a blessing upon.

And Jesus took the five loaves and the two fishes, and looking up to heaven he blessed them. Luke 9:16.

6. To praise; to glorify, for benefits received.

BLESS the Lord, O my soul, and all that is within me. Psalms 103:1.

7. To praise; to magnify; to extol, for excellencies. Psalms 104:1.

8. To esteem or account happy; with the reciprocal pronoun.

The nations shall bless themselves in him. Jeremiah 4:2.

9. To pronounce a solemn prophetical benediction upon. Genesis 2:37. Deuteronomy 33:11.

10. In this line of Spenser, it may signify to throw, for this is nearly the primary sense.

His sparkling blade about his head he blest.

Johnson supposes the word to signify to wave or brandish, and to have received this sense from the old rite of blessing a field, by directing the hands to all parts of it.

BLESS in Spenser for bliss, may be so written, not for rhyme merely, but because bless and bliss are from the same root.
No. 54     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 9, 2017 at 7:56 AM     
Chastise

CHASTISE, verb transitive

1. To correct by punishing; to punish; to inflict pain by stripes, or in other manner, for the purpose of punishing an offender and recalling him to his duty.

I will chastise you seven times for your sins. Leviticus 26:28.

2. To reduce to order or obedience; to restrain; to awe; to repress.

The gay social sense, By decency chastisd.

3. To correct; to purify by expunging faults; as, to chastise a poem.
No. 55     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Nov 9, 2017 at 8:36 AM     
Consecrate

CONSECRATE, verb transitive [Latin , to consecrate sacred. See Sacred.]

1. To make or declare to be sacred, by certain ceremonies or rites; to appropriate to sacred uses; to set apart, dedicate, or devote, to the service and worship of God; as, to consecrate a church.

Thou shalt consecrate Aaron and his sons. Exodus 29:9.

All the silver, and gold, and vessels of brass and iron, are consecrated to the Lord. Joshua 6:19.

2. To canonize; to exalt to the rank of a saint; to enroll among the gods, as a Roman emperor.

3. To set apart and bless the elements in the eucharist.

4. To render venerable; to make respected; as, rules or principles consecrated by time.

CONSECRATE, adjective Sacred; consecrated; devoted; dedicated.

They were assembled in that consecrate place.

[This word is now seldom used, unless in poetry.]
No. 56     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 65   on  Nov 19, 2017 at 8:50 AM     
Fortitude

FOR'TITUDE, noun [Latin fortitudo, from fortis, strong.]

That strength or firmness of mind or soul which enables a person to encounter danger with coolness and courage, or to bear pain or adversity without murmuring, depression or despondency.

fortitude is the basis or source of genuine courage or intrepidity in danger, of patience in suffering, of forbearance under injuries, and of magnanimity in all conditions of life. We sometimes confound the effect with the cause, and use fortitude as synonymous with courage or patience; but courage is an active virtue or vice, and patience is the effect of fortitude

Fortitude is the guard and support of the other virtues.
No. 57     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 65   on  Nov 19, 2017 at 8:53 AM     
Courage

COURAGE, noun [Latin , the heart.] Bravery; intrepidity; that quality of mind which enables men to encounter danger and difficulties with firmness, or without fear or depression of spirits; valor; boldness; resolution. It is a constituent part of fortitude; but fortitude implies patience to bear continued suffering.

COURAGE that grows from constitution, often forsakes a man when he has occasion for it; courage which arises from a sense of duty, acts in a uniform manner.

Be strong and of good courage Deuteronomy 31:6.
No. 58     Reply: From: The Holy Christian Bible   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 65   on  Nov 19, 2017 at 9:03 AM     

Foresake all for Christ

Matthew 19.27

Then answered Peter and said unto him, Behold, we have forsaken all, and followed thee; what shall we have therefore?
No. 59     Reply: Smith's Bible Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 65   on  Nov 29, 2017 at 9:15 AM     
Laver

In the tabernacle, a vessel of brass containing water for the priests to wash their hands and feet before offering sacrifice. It stood in the fore offering sacrifice. It stood in the court between the altar and the door of the tabernacle. (Exodus 30:19,21) It rested on a basis, i.e. a foot, which, was well as the laver itself, was made from the mirrors of the women who assembled at the door of the tabernacle court. (Exodus 38:8 )

The form of the laver is not specified, but may be assumed to have been circular. Like the other vessels belonging to the tabernacle, it was, together with its "foot," consecrated with oil. (Leviticus 8:10,11)

In Solomon's temple, besides the great molten sea, there were ten lavers of brass, raised on bases, (1 Kings 7:27,39) five on the north and five on the south side of the court of the priests. They were used for washing the animals to be offered in burnt offerings. (2 Chronicles 4:6)
No. 60     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 65   on  Nov 29, 2017 at 9:19 AM     
Atonement

ATO'NEMENT, noun

1. Agreement; concord; reconciliation, after enmity or controversy. Romans 5:11.

Between the Duke of Glo'ster and your brothers.

2. Expiation; satisfaction or reparation made by giving an equivalent for an injury, or by doing or suffering that which is received in satisfaction for an offense or injury; with for.

And Moses said to Aaron, go to the altar, and offer thy sin-offering, and thy burnt-offering, and make an atonement for thyself and for the people. Leviticus 9:7.

When a man has been guilty of any vice, the best atonement he can make for it is, to warn others not to fall into the like.

The Phocians behaved with so much gallantry, that they were thought to have made a sufficient atonement for their former offense.

3. In theology, the expiation of sin made by the obedience and personal sufferings of Christ.
No. 61     Reply: Re: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  LynnDear   Gender: F   Age: 63   on  Nov 29, 2017 at 9:25 AM     
Verbatim wrote:

Repentance

REPENT'ANCE, noun

1. Sorrow for any thing done or said; the pain or grief which a person experiences in consequence of the injury or inconvenience produced by his own conduct.

2. In theology, the pain, regret or affliction which a person feels on account of his past conduct, because it exposes him to punishment. This sorrow proceeding merely from the fear of punishment, is called legal repentance as being excited by the terrors of legal penalties, and it may exist without an amendment of life.

3. Real penitence; sorrow or deep contrition for sin, as an offense and dishonor to God, a violation of his holy law, and the basest ingratitude towards a Being of infinite benevolence. This is called evangelical repentance and is accompanied and followed by amendment of life.

Repentance is a change of mind, or a conversion from sin to God.

Godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation. 2 Corinthians 7:9. Matthew 3:8.

Repentance is the relinquishment of any practice, from conviction that it has offended God.


....thank you for sharing this....:goodpost:


No. 62     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 64   on  Dec 4, 2017 at 9:37 AM     
Susie, the word ABUNDANCE has come up in my studies. What does your dictionary say about it, please?
No. 63     Reply: Re: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 65   on  Dec 4, 2017 at 9:53 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Susie, the word ABUNDANCE has come up in my studies. What does your dictionary say about it, please?



Here ya go, Stormy!



ABUND'ANCE, noun Great plenty;

an overflowing quantity; ample sufficiency; in strictness applicable to quantity only; but customarily used of number, as an abundance of peasants.

In scripture, the abundance of the rich is great wealth. Ecclesiastes 5:10. Mark 12:44. Luke 21:4.

The abundance of the seas is great plenty of fish.

Deuteronomy 33:19.

It denotes also fullness, overflowing, as the abundance of the heart. Matthew 12:34. Luke 6:45.


Here is a bonus word:


Abundant

ABUND'ANT, adjective Plentiful;

in great quantity; fully sufficient; as an abundant supply. In scripture, abounding; having in great quantity; overflowing with.

The Lord God is abundant in goodness and truth. Exodus 34:6.

Abundant number, in arithmetic, is one, the sum of whose aliquot parts exceeds the number itself. Thus 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, the aliquot parts of 12, make the sum of 16. This is opposed to a deficient number, as 14, whose aliquot parts are 1, 2, 7, the sum of which is 10; and to a perfect number, which is equal to the sum of its aliquot parts, as 6, whose aliquot parts are 1, 2, 3.

No. 64     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 65   on  Dec 6, 2017 at 12:05 PM     
Piety

PI'ETY, noun [Latin pietas, from pius, or its root, probably a contracted word.]

1. piety in principle, is a compound of veneration or reverence of the Supreme Being and love of his character, or veneration accompanied with love; and piety in practice, is the exercise of these affections in obedience to his will and devotion to his service.

Piety is the only proper and adequate relief of decaying man.

2. Reverence of parents or friends, accompanied with affection and devotion to their honor and happiness.
No. 65     Reply: Re: From Websters 1828 Dictionary   
By:  Verbatim   Gender: F   Age: 65   on  Dec 6, 2017 at 12:41 PM     
Straightway

STRAIGHTWAY, adverb [straight and way.] Immediately; without loss of time; without delay.

He took the damsel by the hand, and said to her, Talitha cumi--and straightway the damsel arose. Mark 5:41-42. [Straightways is obsolete.]