MeetChristians.com Tour

Private
Mailbox

Quick
Search

Detailed
Search

Member
Forums

Live
Chat

Polls
space

User
Tools

Help
space

Log Off
space
MeetChristians.com / Forums / General Discussion

No. 0     Original Topic:  Metal Detectors ...   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Sep 7, 2017 at 7:05 AM   Viewed 332 times     
I have a ... Tesoro Cibola ... metal detector. I consider using it as one of my hobbies ... and enjoy the adventure of finding lost treasures.

Last weekend ... our oldest son and I ... started digging around an area where a house used to stand on his property.

We found two " large size " pennies ... that's right ... not the small size we have now ... but the large size pennies ... from the 1800's.

Also ... we found a coin I didn't know even existed ... a HALF CENT coin ... from 1880.

I truly enjoyed the time with our son and the excitement of finding some old coins.

No. 1     Reply: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  Gary208   Gender: M   Age: 69   on  Sep 7, 2017 at 1:55 PM     
That's Cool RPM!

I've had a few metal detectors, some of which were only good for finding buried shut-offs and clean-outs, which is why I bought that one.

My latest was an amazing unit with excellent discrimination. On coins it told me what coin it was before I dug it up. It could find lost wedding rings while at the same time skipping over can tabs.

I did find enough stuff over the years to warrant the purchase price, but really made a haul when I started going to creeks and finding small gold nuggets with it. It had a special head just for finding gold, and rings. For a long time, that add-on never paid for itself, then wham.

I learned the hard way, you cannot get what gold is worth, due to the cost of selling it. It has to be tested and assayed first, and that is not cheap. I did buy my own test chemicals when I was going whole hog on gold seeking. Got in good with a couple of panners, who would pan the areas I found small nuggets in. They taught me a lot too, which made it easier to find more. The largest nugget I ever found was only slightly larger than pea, all the rest were half that size or smaller, more like a grain of rice in size. If it were not for the panners helping me out, I could never have sold them at all.

The most money I ever made at one time using my metal detector was when I found a ladies diamond ring, of which I knew where she lost it. Many folks swept the area before me and never found it. When I did find it, it was standing on end, and stepped down into the topsoil. I almost missed it myself, because it showed up as an old style can tab, which at the setting I was using meant the density was higher than a can tab, so I decided to check it out. The reward for finding it was just raised from 300 to 400 dollars that morning. The talk at the time was someone already found it but didn't turn it in for the reward. So when I approached the owners, they upped the reward to 500 bucks, and the check was good, hi hi...

Since my second heart attack, I sold the metal detector to someone who is also making good use of it now.

Have a great day!
No. 2     Reply: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Sep 7, 2017 at 6:12 PM     
Thanks Gary ...

I enjoyed reading your post and some of the experiences you have had with metal detectors.

I am still learning how to use mine. Last weekend was fun. I guess it was the " joy of the hunt " more than anything else that made it interesting for me.

If you wish to do so, Gary ... I would love to hear more.

There are three knobs on my detector I'm still wondering about ... like the ...

Threshold Knob

Sensitivity Knob

Discriminate Level Knob

The previous owner told me ( if I remember correctly ) to keep the knobs adjusted at the mid-way point ... and to be honest ... my comprehension from reading the operator's manual is not sinking in very well yet.

This thread is " open " ... if anyone else having some " wisdom " or instruction they would like to share, as I continue this new adventure.

Again, thanks Gary for contributing ... and if you have anything else you would like to say ... I'm open to learning ... or simply hearing more of your own adventures.




No. 3     Reply: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Sep 7, 2017 at 7:35 PM     

Wow -- congrats on your finds! (1/2 piece cent is cool)!

(I used to go metal detecting with my Dad and still have some treasures from that).

No. 4     Reply: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  Gary208   Gender: M   Age: 69   on  Sep 8, 2017 at 1:02 PM     
Hi RPM

I had both a Bounty Hunter Pro and a mid-range Fisher, only the Bounty Hunter had knobs to set, and once I had it the way I wanted it, I drew lines to those set points. This was around a 300 dollar metal detector.

The Fisher was computer controlled and had two frequency settings, one for shallow hunting and one for deep hunting. The model I had normally sold for 8 to 9 hundred dollars, and I managed to cob it for less than or right at 600 bucks, new, but missing the 10" head. Had the 6" and 11" though. It was not used, but the package was opened at the store, so a couple of the other items that normally come with it, like the pouch and junk I would never use were not with it either.

The Bounty Hunter is the one that had the gold seeking head. Even so, the Fisher worked just as well for that purpose with the small 6" head.

The big difference was how they worked on different land surfaces.
The Bounty Hunter I had to keep adjusting, usually by holding the head just above the ground I wanted to cover. If the land was smooth I used one setting, if it was lumpy I used another, or if it had tall grass yet another.
The Fisher self-adjusted to whatever surface you were over with the head. It also knew if you were over dry dirt or moist soil.
Both units would tell you how deep the object was!
The Bounty Hunter would tell you the denomination of the coin with fair accuracy. The Fisher did the same but with added information which was often valuable, like the density of the object. This made it superior to the Bounty Hunter for finding wedding rings. The Bounty Hunter might consider a ring a can tab since it did not have a density scale.

Iron items, are the plague of all metal detectors.
The Bounty Hunter you could only turn on or off ferrous metals.
The Fisher would still monitor ferrous metals and skip over nails and screws, but would let you know if an iron object was shaped like a horseshoe, or a possible old wagon part, while skipping over rebars and grating in nearby concrete slabs.
This part was great because I could go around the perimeter of concrete slab pavilions and find tons of coins the other metal detectors missed.

If I was rich, I would love to have one of those with X-Ray vision, hi hi... But at 8 to 10 grand, they were naturally out of the question.
Although I've seen a few DEEP metal detectors for under a grand.
Unfortunately, I wouldn't know where to look for buried treasure, hi hi...




No. 5     Reply: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Sep 9, 2017 at 7:00 AM     
Amazing Gary ... Just Amazing ...

And here I was ... being amazed ... with what my little metal detector could do.

I had no idea there were detectors doing all of the other things you shared in your post. Sounds like you have had a lot of fun using your detectors.

I'm looking forward to going out again with mine. I like finding old coins and the adventure of never knowing what you may dig up.

Someone told me there is a special digging tool you can buy, but I can't seem to remember what it's called. The next time I go to a sports store I am going to look for it.

My wife's little flower garden hand shovel is okay to use, but I still want to see what this specialized digging tool looks like ... and if it's not too expensive ... I will probably buy one.

Sure did enjoy reading what you shared Gary ! Thank you !

No. 6     Reply: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  Gary208   Gender: M   Age: 69   on  Sep 9, 2017 at 3:18 PM     
Hi RPM

You don't need a fancy tool.
I just used one of the big old flat head screwdrivers for a long time. Then I got a garden tool for pulling up Dandelions.
I like the screwdriver best because it fit into the end of the shaft where the cap-plug belonged.
But on the Fisher there was a clamp for holding a couple of tools, so this is when I got the Dandelion tool. It's like a screwdriver except the end is cut into a V-shape to cut the root.
I did carry a hand trowel but only used it perhaps three times.

Now, if you do decide to go wading in creeks, two tools come in handy. A small flat crowbar to slip under a large rock to tilt it up, and a small 3 inch diameter sieve with a handle, a strong one, so you can scoop up the sand and gravel where the nugget might be hiding under the leading edge of the rock you tilted up.

My first two metal detectors were simple devices. They made a squeal if you passed over anything metal. I kept that old first one to find sewer and clean-out lids in yards.
The second one was a bit better and you could turn off ferrous metals. I didn't really like it because I had to wear headphones, and it did not have a display.

The cost for the better metal detectors came down considerably before I could afford to buy one. Got it from WalMart when the eyeglass department was closing out the secondary items they carried, like metal detectors and telescopes. I actually loved that thing and had a lot of fun with it.
Unfortunately, I never found anything of value until I moved up to the better quality detectors that told me what it was it was seeing down there.

In the area I now live, we had a few civil war battlegrounds, so one will always find a few lead balls, and sometimes even a cannonball.

After two heart attacks, there is no going out and walking back and forth to cover an acre or two anymore. I do good just making it through the cardiac rehab exercises three days a week.

Public parks, especially those with various types of ball fields, you can find a lot of coins under where the portable bleachers get set up. And on either side of walking paths where folks drop things. Joggers tend to lose rings every now and then. Maybe you'll be lucky!

Have a great day and may God bless!
No. 7     Reply: Re: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Sep 14, 2017 at 6:41 AM     
Gary208 wrote:

After two heart attacks, there is no going out and walking back and forth to cover an acre or two anymore. I do good just making it through the cardiac rehab exercises three days a week.



Sorry to hear your " going out and about " is limited. I pray your heart is doing okay and hope the rehab is being a help to you.

I appreciated you sharing what you know and granting me your wisdom from your metal detector experiences.

I guess as our bodies age ... and we become more limited on what we can do ... we can always be available to share the wisdom and knowledge we have gained ... that is ... if anyone is willing to listen.

No. 8     Reply: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Sep 14, 2017 at 7:42 AM     
My Dad had bought a Metal Detector and we used it all the time including out west.

I found a lot of buried coins with it.

Our metal detecting days ended when one time on a Camping Trip at Rock Cut State Park in Rockford, IL I had placed it underneath our car to keep it out of the rain.

Well the next morning someone backed right up over it with the car and crushed it, lol.

My Dad wanted to kill me, lol.

I plan on getting a good one eventually for gold prospecting.

I have a lifetime membership with a gold mining club and have access to hundreds of private proven placer gold claims.

Would just be a future hobby while vacationing here and there.
No. 9     Reply: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  Gary208   Gender: M   Age: 69   on  Sep 14, 2017 at 1:30 PM     
Hi RPM

Before I started cardiac rehab I walked every day, which helped some, but not enough.

Since I sit at a desk all day, I would take a break and walk around the building once every couple of hours. It took me almost three months before I could make it around the building twice. I worked very hard to get up to where I could make it three times around the building, but not always. Many times I shook so bad after making that third trip, I couldn't type for a half hour.

Going around the building is up some steps, up a hill, up more across the back and back down the side and across to the front where the door is.
I never gave it much thought as to why I couldn't walk as far as when I'm walking down the road and back.
I could make it down to the mailbox, but could only make it half way back up without stopping to rest for about ten to fifteen minutes.

I learned an amazing thing (to me) when I started rehab. I never thought I could get through a full hour of exercise, but I did. Of course they start you off easy, and make it a little harder each week.

But there is KEY as to why I did so well in rehab, and so poorly at home. Shame it took me over a month of sessions before I figured out why.
The first thing we do is walk for five minutes on flat ground, going around an oval, they call this our warm-up walk. Then we start on each of five different exercise routines, and end with a five minute walk around the oval as a cool-down.

After two months of exercises, I still could not make it around my building more than three times. But, once I started doing a five minute warm-up on flat ground first, I could walk around the building for an hour, without getting the shakes. The whole KEY to doing it was walking on flat ground for five minutes first. If I do that, I can walk down to the mailbox and back up the hill, and still go around the building several times.

Another Key is to not do any individual strenuous thing for more than ten minutes, without moving onto something else that uses a different part of the body. If something uses your arms, like painting or spackling, stop after ten minutes and do something that uses your legs instead of your arms for ten minutes. It may take an hour to do a twenty minute project that way, but you get it done without suffering afterwards.

My metal detectors were fairly heavy, and swinging them from side to side overexercised my arms big time. Wish I would have known what I learned in rehab, perhaps I could have still enjoyed using my detectors.

Have a great day and may God bless!
No. 10     Reply: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Sep 14, 2017 at 1:46 PM     
Gary wrote: "...My metal detectors were fairly heavy, and swinging them from side to side overexercised my arms big time. Wish I would have known what I learned in rehab, perhaps I could have still enjoyed using my detectors...."


Many of today's metal detectors are very lightweight.

And I have seen special, "slings" for many of them which places most of the weight on your shoulder rather than your arms.

As a result it is much easier using them than it used to be!
No. 11     Reply: Re: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Sep 15, 2017 at 5:11 AM     
Gary208 wrote:

My metal detectors were fairly heavy, and swinging them from side to side overexercised my arms big time. Wish I would have known what I learned in rehab, perhaps I could have still enjoyed using my detectors.



Hey Gary ...

Bullfighter's " info " about lighter detectors with a sling and your " info " on what you learned in rehab ... may be ... the right combination for you to get back into using and enjoying metal detectors again.

Thanks again for sharing what you have learned Gary !

Also enjoyed reading your post too Bullfighter.

No. 12     Reply: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  Gary208   Gender: M   Age: 69   on  Sep 15, 2017 at 3:03 PM     
Thanks gang, I'll keep that in mind!
No. 13     Reply: Re: Re: Metal Detectors ...   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Sep 15, 2017 at 6:07 PM     
Gary208 wrote:

Thanks gang, I'll keep that in mind!



:2thumbs: