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MeetChristians.com / Forums / General Discussion

No. 0     Original Topic:  Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 4:29 PM   Viewed 9430 times     
Well I finally did SOMETHING about planting some veggies this year! Just planted Delicious Tomato, Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce, Green Salad Bowl Lettuce, Bloomsdale Longstanding Spinach, a 4 variety package of Radishes, and Pickling Cucumbers. I planted everything in pots on the deck so far. Still have to pull all the weeds out of the grden bed and plant something there yet.

Well it's a start anyway and better late than never! KI:dance:
No. 1     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Devaprakash   Gender: M   Age: 71   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 8:01 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Well I finally did SOMETHING about planting some veggies this year! Just planted Delicuos Tomato, Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce, Green Salad Bowl Lettuce, Bommsdale Lindstanding Spinach, a 4 variety package of Radishes, and Pickling Cucumbers. I planted everything in pots on the deck so far. Still have to pull all the weeds out of the grden bed and plant something there yet.

Well it's a start anyway and better late than never! KI:dance:


We have grown the following in our garden:

4 coconut and areca nut trees, 2 pomegranate plants, 1 guava and custard apple plant, 2 banana plants, rose apple tree, curry leaves tree,beetle leaves, 1 fig and 1 date palm tree, aloevera, several flower plants, mint leaf, medicinal and food green leaves, Mexican lawn, ginger, sofota fruit plant, etc.
No. 2     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 8:05 PM     
I was working out in the garden at my sisters place and she uses these really high quality garden tools, the best I've ever seen, I looked at one of them the other day and it said it was made by Cutco, yeah, the Cutlery Company, I didn't know they made garden tools, anyway, these garden tools are very well made but very expensive to buy, try pricing them on EBAY and you will see what I'm talking about!
No. 3     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 9:19 PM     
Brought my magazine to work to read between rounds, “Organic Gardening“. It is a special edition by Mother Earth News. I got it a few months back but need to re-read it again to get me in the gardening mood.
No. 4     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 48   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 10:46 PM     
Did you know that you can take the end off of an onion and soak it in water until it roots and plant it and it will produce another onion. My Mom just did this and we have a plant that is very large (potted but tall and it's flowering now). You pull the onion after it flowers.

One can do this in pots and have no cause to buy onions anymore.

No. 5     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 10:59 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Did you know that you can take the end off of an onion and soak it in water until it roots and plant it and it will produce another onion. My Mom just did this and we have a plant that is very large (potted but tall and it's flowering now). You pull the onion after it flowers.

One can do this in pots and have no cause to buy onions anymore.



Hmn I think we did this as a science experiment in grade school.

Will have to try it in a pot...
No. 6     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 48   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 11:03 PM     
You soak the side of the onion that has the dried roots.

No. 7     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  PlowMan   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 11:50 PM     
We grow what we can and harvest wild edibles as much as we can.

No store bought produce can compare to the taste or quality of what we grow ourselves or what we can harvest from the wild.

An added bonus is a lot of what we harvest from the wild simply can not be bought and both the wild harvest and what we grow is and always has been totally organic.

There is nothing healthier then what God has provided.
No. 8     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 48   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 11:56 PM     
PlowMan wrote:

We grow what we can and harvest wild edibles as much as we can.

No store bought produce can compare to the taste or quality of what we grow ourselves or what we can harvest from the wild.

An added bonus is a lot of what we harvest from the wild simply can not be bought and both the wild harvest and what we grow is and always has been totally organic.

There is nothing healthier then what God has provided.


And it tastes so much better!!

No. 9     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 11:58 PM     
Unfortunately, I am not in a position to grow things currently at my home, much as I'd like to.

In a couple of weeks, on the July 4th weekend, I'll be heading for the extreme southern part of Indiana for my annual sojourn to a self-reliant farm gathering that happens every year. The owners are totally into self-reliance, and their farm, though humble, is pretty awesome. Usually around 150-200 people, from a 5 or 6 state area gather together for fellowship, camping, community cooking, workshops, and more.

(Check out my article and pics of this event from 2010 - http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=19629.0 )

Last year, when my brother and I were at this same farm event, we found some wild onions growing alongside the roadside near the farm. We picked several of them and my brother replanted them in November (optimal time) at his place. They are growing quite nicely.

No. 10     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 18, 2015 at 2:00 AM     
I don't think i've ever grown potatoes or onions, just green onions.

I have read you can grown quite a large crop of potatoes in a barrel.

I have some green onions and chives out back which come up every year.

My Raspberries are looking good and should start ripening in a few weeks.

My Rhubarb plant is looking healthy, the other plant not so good this year.

Maybe I should make a Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie, those are quite good!
No. 11     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 18, 2015 at 2:04 AM     
Every year my main crops have been varies Tomatoes, sweet & hot peppers.

This year I am trying a few different things though to give the soil a rest.

I still need to get some more seeds from Family Dollar or Dollar General. Hey they are cheap, 4 to 10 packs for $1.00. They generally will close them out at 10 packs for $1.00 later in the growing season when they want to close them out.

And they do produce too I can attest to that!

Will pick up a few plants next week too if I can find anything left.
No. 12     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 18, 2015 at 6:11 PM     
On a side note yesterday I girdled a 6“ thick branch on my huge Maple Tree. The leaves are blocking the sun to my solar panels so it has to go. I don't know how long it will take the branch and leaves to die now but I guess we'll find out.

My bow saw blade is worn so girdling is a quick and easy way to kill it without having to cut all the way through it. Over time all the branches will die on that branch and just fall off after rotting.
No. 13     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 18, 2015 at 8:30 PM     
Bought 20 different packs of vegetable seeds at family Dollar just now. .25 each so only $5.00 for all 20 packs.

Don't know if i'll have room to plant everything but we'll see. Some of these seeds will still be viable next year.
No. 14     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  Jun 19, 2015 at 6:44 PM     
My youngest daughter, newly a mother for the first time, lives in an apartment complex. She and her husband's neighbors are pretty friendly, as is the complex owner.

Long story short, at the end of the complex, in a fenced-in secluded area, little used, a community garden has been created, and with the owner's permission. I was there today for a visit so my daughter gave me the tour of the garden. It is an awesome project, and my daughter tells me she gets most of her veggies there for her salads.
No. 15     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  listenandhear   Gender: F   Age: 58   on  Jun 19, 2015 at 11:05 PM     
I am starting very late this summer. i had to get help this year cause of body aches and pains, arthritis etc... anyway the rotter tiller just tilled yesterday. my volunteers planted 13 tomato plants, two cucumber plants and helped me get my posts and netting up so i can plant my green beans and snow peas tomorrow. got another two plots ready to plant yellow beans and hopefully onions. can you believe it my lettuce just started growing from last year again. never ever seen that happen before. so cool.
now i got to get some dill to plant too!

love the summer.
No. 16     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 23, 2015 at 10:04 AM     
I got up early this morning and started Gardening at 6am to 9:30am to beat the heat.

I weeded, and weeded, and weeded last year's Garden beds, and munched on a handful of ripe Raspberries out of my patch. I had weeds to pull out of there too including poison ivy! :icon_eek:

Then I turned the soil breaking it up. I planted Kentucky Pole Beans which climb piles or strings 8' high, yellow wax beans, cucumbers, zucchini, yellow straightneck squash, and Delicious Tomatoes in one bed.

I decided to give the soil a rest this year and planted all of the above instead of all Tomatoes and Peppers like I normally do.

The beans I have read somehow add Nitrogen to the soil when grown there.

Haven't decided what to plant in the ither bed, need something that can do well in partail shade or partial sun. I have thought about koading it up with more Raspberry Brambles, they do well in limited sun.
No. 17     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 23, 2015 at 10:08 AM     
The lettuce, spinach, beans, and cucumbers I planted in pots not even a week ago are already sprouting. Those are on my deck. Don't know if the beans will do well in a pot but we'll see.
No. 18     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  joyful   Gender: F   Age: 59   on  Jun 23, 2015 at 7:09 PM     
I am doing hugelkultur this year. http://www.permaculture.co.uk/articles/many-benefits-hugelkultur

No. 19     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 23, 2015 at 10:51 PM     
Amazingly some of the newly sprouted lettuce grew a whole inch from early morning when I looked at it to this afternoon.
No. 20     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 24, 2015 at 7:50 AM     
Went out and picked my morning handful of Raspberries and ate them...mmnnn. Pulled a few more wild vines out of the Raspberry patch that I found.
No. 21     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 24, 2015 at 7:54 AM     
listenandhear wrote:

I am starting very late this summer. i had to get help this year cause of body aches and pains, arthritis etc... anyway the rotter tiller just tilled yesterday. my volunteers planted 13 tomato plants, two cucumber plants and helped me get my posts and netting up so i can plant my green beans and snow peas tomorrow. got another two plots ready to plant yellow beans and hopefully onions. can you believe it my lettuce just started growing from last year again. never ever seen that happen before. so cool.
now i got to get some dill to plant too!

love the summer.


Go with raised beds, no stooping down to the ground! Every year or so I try and another 4" landscaping Timber and more soil to increase the height.
No. 22     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jun 24, 2015 at 7:59 AM     
insular926 wrote:

I was working out in the garden at my sisters place and she uses these really high quality garden tools, the best I've ever seen, I looked at one of them the other day and it said it was made by Cutco, yeah, the Cutlery Company, I didn't know they made garden tools, anyway, these garden tools are very well made but very expensive to buy, try pricing them on EBAY and you will see what I'm talking about!


Quality garden tools can last a lifetime if stored indoors.

I have broken cheap ones pronto.
No. 23     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Jun 24, 2015 at 7:59 AM     
Did you hear about the guy wanting to raise chickens ?

He went to the store and bought the little chicks, but they all died.

So, he went back and bought some more, but they all died.

Finally, he realized he was planting them in the ground too deep !

Ha .... ha .... ha .... he ... he ... ha .... he ... ha .... ha !

On a serious note ... my wife and I started our strawberry patch.

Cute little berries ... and real sweet too !

Ummmm ! Ummmmm ! Ummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm ! :tongue:

No. 24     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 5:49 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Did you know that you can take the end off of an onion and soak it in water until it roots and plant it and it will produce another onion. My Mom just did this and we have a plant that is very large (potted but tall and it's flowering now). You pull the onion after it flowers.

One can do this in pots and have no cause to buy onions anymore.



I took 3 of the green onions purchased at the farmer's market and planted them since they still had the small red bulbs on the end. We will see what they do. Seem to be shooting up a little.
No. 25     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 5:54 PM     
insular926 wrote:

I was working out in the garden at my sisters place and she uses these really high quality garden tools, the best I've ever seen, I looked at one of them the other day and it said it was made by Cutco, yeah, the Cutlery Company, I didn't know they made garden tools, anyway, these garden tools are very well made but very expensive to buy, try pricing them on EBAY and you will see what I'm talking about!


I bought a pair of pruning shears at Dollar General and had a chance to use them today. They had 2 models, I chose the one for $2 more, $6. It was well worth it. This better brand has a compound action when you squeeze the handles it multiplies the force. It really shows too as I effortlessly chopped 1" thick bushes that were growing into trees. Glad I bought the better quality one.
No. 26     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 6:09 PM     
The Kentucky pole beans, summer roughneck yellow squash, Zucchini, and Cucumbers are growing like crazy and sending out runners, they are starting to climb. I put some tomatoes cages around them for now until I can order some tall bamboo poles next payday. I have them in pots on my deck and in the ground as well. That way if the brats pick them all in the ground i'll still have some on the deck.

Tomato plants I started from seed are doing very well, about a foot tall in a five gallon bucket.

Lettuce is doing fine, I fertilized it with blood meal for nitrogen.
No. 27     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 6:14 PM     
I sprayed the poison ivy with some poison. 😤 None of it is in my garden yet except in a small area where my raspberries grow. They are almost done producing until fall when I get a second but smaller crop. 😀
No. 28     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 6:26 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Unfortunately, I am not in a position to grow things currently at my home, much as I'd like to.



Why?

Do you have a balcony at least?

If so you can grow intensively in pots vertically and still have a fair amount of food. ☺

There are varieties of tomatoes that grow in a 4" pot in your windowsill and produce a good amount of fruit. "Micro Tom" is one of them.

Same goes for many other varieties of fruits and veggies which grow in small pots.
No. 29     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 48   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 6:33 PM     
Bullfighter -- I am thinking of planting berries and grapes and only one tree (verses the two I was considering before).

After the deck (which I have not been doing because of the intense heat) and the planting...I have to figure out what to do with the huge decomposed granite hill behind my house! A tree is growing on it...and then weeds mixed with some wild grass. It's so much land and a steep hill (a hiking area in one's back yard really).

Send suggestions to me on FB if you want. I had the suggestion of a vineyard that I love!



No. 30     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 6:35 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

My youngest daughter, newly a mother for the first time, lives in an apartment complex. She and her husband's neighbors are pretty friendly, as is the complex owner.

Long story short, at the end of the complex, in a fenced-in secluded area, little used, a community garden has been created, and with the owner's permission. I was there today for a visit so my daughter gave me the tour of the garden. It is an awesome project, and my daughter tells me she gets most of her veggies there for her salads.


As I was riding the bus one day I passed an official community garden in one of the poorer areas of town.

In the small town my grandmother was in there was a vacant lot around the corner that everyone in the neighborhood worked and shared in the harvest.

Such community gardens were commonly called, "Victory Gardens" during WWII. 👑
No. 31     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 6:43 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Bullfighter -- I am thinking of planting berries and grapes and only one tree (verses the two I was considering before).

After the deck (which I have not been doing because of the intense heat) and the planting...I have to figure out what to do with the huge decomposed granite hill behind my house! A tree is growing on it...and then weeds mixed with some wild grass. It's so much land and a steep hill (a hiking area in one's back yard really).

Send suggestions to me on FB if you want. I had the suggestion of a vineyard that I love!





What kind of berries? 🐢

Starting a vineyard takes a little regular work.

Once established they are easier.

We had wild grapes growing along our fence at the RR auto facility I worked at for 14 years. Some years we had an abundant crop.

Sadly they would cut them all down for security reasons so the k9 RR cop could run his dog outside the fence line looking for breaches. 🐺:hug:
No. 32     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 48   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 6:46 PM     
Berry bushes so I don't have to plant every year! I want more raspberries and blueberries in my Mom's diet!

No. 33     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 7:00 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Berry bushes so I don't have to plant every year! I want more raspberries and blueberries in my Mom's diet!



Raspberries, once established are easy. Blackberries can be very prolific and both make great security hedges when planted outside your windows 😀

Blackberry brambles are taller and thicker than raspberries. Both do well in partial sun.

My blueberry bushes I had in pots died last year. 😥 I think I will have better luck with them in the ground next time.
No. 34     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 7:06 PM     
Growing grapes in San Diego http://www.sdedible.org/grapes.html

Note the above link has info on growing berries and fruit trees in San Diego as well.
No. 35     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 14, 2015 at 7:34 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Berry bushes so I don't have to plant every year! I want more raspberries and blueberries in my Mom's diet!



Keep in mind with raspberries there are two types.

One type you will have to wait 2 years before seeing any fruit.

The other type bears fruit the first year and the second year, two crops per year actually.
No. 36     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 48   on  Jul 15, 2015 at 12:33 PM     

Thanks Bullfighter. I wanted to finish the deck first, but as the season is upon us...I might do planting first.

No. 37     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  May 24, 2016 at 9:09 PM     
Well looking at all the scrumptious Nursery catalogs online got me in the mood to get out and tackle the weeds.

I cut and chopped them away from my Raspberry Brambles, they were killing one of them but I think it will recover. My main patch seems to be growing like crazy this year, and I haven't even fertilized them yet!

Now that I got the weeds out of the way they will do even better. Tomorrow when I wake up i'll get out there in the morning while it's still cool and fertilize them.

Got the weeds away from the Rhubarb plants too, one of which is much bigger, the other one doesn't get as much sun due to some nearby bushes. I trimmed some of the bushes away so the smaller one should do better now.

They are already going to seed! Stalks still quite edible, but thicker and coarser inside.

The Chives were being shaded out by o0ne of the huge Rhubarb leaves and a few weeds.

They are blooming. I should chop some for putting on a salad.

Speaking of salad...There is lettuce that sprouted from last year growing in 2 of the pots on the deck! Including some growing on the deck itself where a little dirt has accumulated! :icon_eek::unsure: Last year it went to seed eventually and now I am seeing it growing this year and haven't even touched them yet!

And I noticed those little poison ivy plants are there again as usual just outside my garden and one inside in a few spots. Will have to apply the weed killer to them tomorrow too.

Thursday it's off to the hardware store to buy Veggie plants! I'm glad I waited since we have had some really late frosts here. I think we're safe now though.
No. 38     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  May 24, 2016 at 9:14 PM     
Checkout this "White Strawberry" plant from Starkbros...it's called, "Wonderful Pineberry Strawberry". It will grow in FULL shade!

http://www.starkbros.com/products/berry-plants/strawberry-plants/wonderful-pineberry-strawberry

No. 39     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  May 24, 2016 at 9:49 PM     
Burgess, another IL Nursery has the "White Strawberry" as well.

They call there's, "Pineberry, White Carolina". And much cheaper than Starkbros. Only $7.99 for 6 plants.

"Strawberries that taste like pineapples! White Carolina is a naturally hybridized selection from crossing two different strawberry species. The result is a plant that bears a smaller pale pink berry that has a unique pineapple flavor to it. The plants generally bear in the spring and then later in the summer like an everbearer. Grows 6-8" tall and 18" wide. Zones 4-8."

http://www.eburgess.com/detail.asp?pid=3161

No. 40     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  May 24, 2016 at 10:05 PM     
Hey here's an idea. Why "buy" pots when you can "grow them" for free instead!?

The, "Bushel Gourd" grows 3 to 5 FEET in diameter! Wow you could give a kid a bath in one of these babies!

"The Bushel Gourd is a colossal sized gourd that measures 3-5' in diameter! Fruits weigh from 25-50 pounds each with reports of some getting up to 100 pounds. Bushel Gourds are wonderful for crafts or as a container. Dries lightweight. 120 days."

http://www.eburgess.com/detail.asp?pid=3375&nav=veg



P.S. The 106 year old Woman at work I check on 2 twice a night was a world "Gourd Expert". Her and her Husband used to make huge "Gourd Animals" and many of their creations are now in Museums. She used to lecture around the world about Gourds at one time.
No. 41     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  May 25, 2016 at 10:08 AM     
Well got everything done this morning I set out to do. Started at 6:10am when it was cooler. Was sweating and it felt hot anyway, and it's only 75 out, was much cooler this morning.

Cut the grass, pulled weeds, poisoned the poison ivy I found here and there.

Trimmed some bushes back so the Rhubarb & Chives get more sunlight. With each branch I cut I could see the whole area geting brighter and brighter. I'm sure the plants would agree.

Trimmed some small trees of small branches too. I need a new blade or a rat tail file to sharpen up my existing wood saw blade for the heavier branches.

Turned the soil over in one garden bed. Still have one more bed that's in the shade usually to do.

Put down some Blood Meal in the bed, and in the 2 pots that lettuce is growing in from last year. They look a little pale, light green, so needed Nitrogen, which is what Blood Meal is for.

Worked about 3 hours total. It's a start! :dance:
No. 42     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 1, 2016 at 7:55 PM     
Went to Wallyworld to get some supplies.

The real small trays of veggie plants were just about gone.

So I had to advance to the $3 pots instead.

Got a Sweet 100, why they call it a 100 I don't know. I grew one of these one time growing up as a late teen and it grew 8' tall and I had to build a huge trellis for it. It probably produced more like 1000 Cherry Tomatoes! :icon_eek:

Also bought a Sweet Husky Cherry Tomato plant.

And a Patio Tomato, they don't get very tall and grow great in pots yet produce medium sized Tomatoes.

An Italian Sweet Pepper plant, never had one before so thought i'd try.

210 bulb assortment of Red, White, and Yellow Onions. I doubt i'll eat or plant that many but it was under $5.

10 Strawberry Roots in a bag at half price.

10 Jersey Knight Asparagus.

10 of some other type of Asparugus.

Grand Rapids Lettuce seed, .20 a pack.

Lemon Cucumbers, .20 a pack too.

The other day I bought a bunch of seed packs of differing varieties at Family Dollar for .20 a pack too, many of them were Heirloom ones too.

Planted the Sweet 100 & the Sweet Cherry Husky plants in the ground a little while ago.

Tomorrow morning we plant the rest.

No. 43     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 1, 2016 at 8:00 PM     
The Poison Ivy I sprayed with poison the other day is growing very well. I think it thought it was fertilizer. :unsure:

So today I spent what $8 for a spray bottle of poison ivy killer from Round Up. If that won'.t kill it nothing will! I hate to use poisons but I don't hyave much choice. Most of it is not near my garden except for 2 or 3 small plants that are IN the garden beds!

I just won't plant anything near it this year.

Bought another bag of all purpose veggie fertilizer too.
No. 44     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 56   on  Jun 2, 2016 at 9:32 AM     
I've been wanting to buy one of these kits to grow portabello mushrooms.
No. 45     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 2, 2016 at 12:31 PM     
insular926 wrote:

I've been wanting to buy one of these kits to grow portabello mushrooms.


Ya me too, the Button mushroom kits are easiest to grow i hear.

A mushroom growing kit needs a cool place like a basement.

Another OUTDOOR alternative is to buy pre-innoculated logs which will grow mushroom crops for years! Low maintenance too.
No. 46     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 2, 2016 at 12:32 PM     
Ok i'm off to do some gardening for a few hours, and to see how the Poison ivy held up after poisoning it yesterday...
No. 47     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 102   on  Jun 2, 2016 at 4:31 PM     
That time of the season again!

BF -- I saw lemonade blueberries I wanted to plant (on home depot's website), but they do not ship them to San Diego for pick up.

Organic fertilizer: High Gluten Corn meal works awesome to get rid of weeds and feed plants.

The drought is working against my landscaping efforts (for two years now). . Just bought some CA coastal sunflowers yesterday and red rubber mulch, but will be going back for some organic top soil (I am trying to discourage termites with the rubber mulch and it is suppose to last 10 years or so). Hopefully the organic top soil will be low on mulch as far as attracting unwanted bugs.

No. 48     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 2, 2016 at 4:39 PM     
Got the Strawberry Roots planted.

6 Lemon Cucumber Seeds, very strange looking, i've planted them before, they are yellow, round and get to be the size of a Baseball. n Heirloom variety.

Grand Rapids & Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce from seed.

Beefsteak Tomato from seed. Kind of a late start but I should get some big ones by Fall.

Some Onion Sets, all 3 varieties.

Some Radishes from seed.

Transplanted the Italian Sweet Pepper Plant into a bigger pot.



No. 49     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 2, 2016 at 4:46 PM     
The poison Ivy looked just as healthy as ever. And I found more of it I missed yesterday!

After re-reading the instructions though this type of poison is absorbed through the leaves, travels down to the root through the plant, and attacks an enzyme on the roots.

It says it is GUARANTEED to kill the whole plant including the root!

It can take up to 4 weeks to kill a poison ivy plant.

It says it works best in the Fall but can be used anytime of the year.

So I guess I have to just sit back and wait until they get bigger...and bigger... :unsure::Hole:

Supposedly the active ingredient in this killer is "Glysophate" and it breaks down in the soil so as not to harm nearby plants.

I have already used 2/3rds of the spray bottle, not much left.
No. 50     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Jun 2, 2016 at 10:01 PM     
With my Mom recently having back surgery, I doubt she is going to put in the large garden as she has for years. I am thinking about going over and using the 1/2 acre of what she has available to put in a garden myself.
No. 51     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 102   on  Jun 5, 2016 at 3:02 PM     
So I finally found a drought resistant plant that requires little to no water but flowers...an evergreen...

California Lilac / carmel creeper

But I can't find where to get it in San Diego (I keep calling and everyone says they do not have it right now. I did find out that the red apple ground covering that died...also occurred to the grower and they think a virus? I am able to find it though at a few nurseries (just a shortage).

Whatever the case...I would like to know if mint can grow alongside the red apple as mint takes over a garden quickly and would fill in my bear spots (where the red apple died) and also keeps away mice I just learned!

BF -- would you know?

No. 52     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 8, 2016 at 9:01 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

So I finally found a drought resistant plant that requires little to no water but flowers...an evergreen...

California Lilac / carmel creeper

But I can't find where to get it in San Diego (I keep calling and everyone says they do not have it right now. I did find out that the red apple ground covering that died...also occurred to the grower and they think a virus? I am able to find it though at a few nurseries (just a shortage).

Whatever the case...I would like to know if mint can grow alongside the red apple as mint takes over a garden quickly and would fill in my bear spots (where the red apple died) and also keeps away mice I just learned!

BF -- would you know?



Sorry, I don't know much about California plant life yet only having been there perhaps 5 times in my life.

I think I do remember Mint as being a quickly spreading plant?:unsure:
No. 53     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 8, 2016 at 9:06 PM     
Well it's official, my lawnmower is now junk. It is so rusted out the wheels no longer safely support it. I will likely set it by the road with a sign that says, "Free, engine still works, body is shot". Someone will grab it up the same day.

So I used a manual pushmower with a rotary blade I had bought years ago as a backup. Had to add some rust penetrant oil and then some motor oil to all the moving parts and blades and took awhile to get the thing pushing and in cutting shape again but after fighting the weeds and grass with it after about 15 minutes it started cutting like normal again.

That thing will take the wind out of you! :sick:
No. 54     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Jun 11, 2016 at 8:37 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

With my Mom recently having back surgery, I doubt she is going to put in the large garden as she has for years. I am thinking about going over and using the 1/2 acre of what she has available to put in a garden myself.


Well, my Mom has opted to not put in a garden at all. Pondering if I have the time. I have a very busy summer on the agenda as it is with volunteer activities and travel getting under full swing.

This was also to be the summer to get my requirements completed as a member of the Michigan Volunteer Defense Force.
No. 55     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Joseph698   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 15, 2016 at 7:50 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Well I finally did SOMETHING about planting some veggies this year! Just planted Delicious Tomato, Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce, Green Salad Bowl Lettuce, Bloomsdale Longstanding Spinach, a 4 variety package of Radishes, and Pickling Cucumbers. I planted everything in pots on the deck so far. Still have to pull all the weeds out of the grden bed and plant something there yet.

Well it's a start anyway and better late than never! KI:dance:



well done, its therapeutic; i love gardening but unfortunately dont have good health; using weedkillers years ago may have contributed when they didnt issue masks, it was part of my job. now my immunity is low


i still have a few things in pots outside to escape the slugs - do you have problems with those pesky things....I live in the UK btw ?
No. 56     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  123john62   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jun 15, 2016 at 10:02 AM     


Joseph wrote:
"well done, its therapeutic; i love gardening but unfortunately dont have good health; using weedkillers years ago may have contributed when they didnt issue masks, it was part of my job. now my immunity is low


i still have a few things in pots outside to escape the slugs - do you have problems with those pesky things....I live in the UK btw ?@

Yes, gardening is very therapeutic as well as getting some very fresh produce without artificial and chemical ingredients.

Although this might be straying from the subject; Joseph, you mentioned that your immunity level is low and that your health is not in good condition. First of all, I'm so sorry to hear that. But do you know that there are natural ways to bring your immunity level up?

May our Heavenly Father bless you, Joseph.








No. 57     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 15, 2016 at 11:23 AM     
In order to keep your immunity level up eat fresh fruits and veggies direct from the garden, as fresh as you can get.

Farmer's Markets are a good alternative if you can't grow your own. They are generally pretty fresh.

Going out to check on my Raspberries to see if they are getting ripe yet.
No. 58     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 15, 2016 at 7:26 PM     
I noticed a Mulberry Tree growing wild with some ripe fruit on it on the way to the 1st Bus stop. Strange I never noticed it before. It is about 100' before the huge poison ivy patch. It is all woods there, no houses nearby so no problem with harvesting some.

I stopped to pick and eat some yum! Maybe tomorrow morning i'll go that way and stop and pick a whole bunch one the way home. Will have to line a food container with some paper towels for 6 block the trip home from that point.

Mulberries are tasty but do not seem to ship well. The Juice oozes all over and stains your fingers too! Maybe if I pick some half ripe ones they will last longer and ripen days later?
No. 59     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 15, 2016 at 7:31 PM     
Well the Onion Sets I planted in a 5 gallon bucket just 2 weeks ago are ALREADY ready to cut as, "green onions" for salads, etc.

They must be Nutritious being green huh? :unsure:

The tops are ready anyway, i'm sure the bulbs are still small underground.
No. 60     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 21, 2016 at 7:25 PM     
Ate all the ripe Raspberries I could find before the kids do. YUMMY!

Transplanted some Straightneck Yellow Squash & Cucumbers I started from seed a few weeks back from pots into the ground. Planted 1 of them in a 5 gallon bucket.

FINALLY transplanted 2 varieties of Asparagus Roots that I bought a month ago and have been sitting in their original plastic bags in an outdoor storage cabinet out of the sun.-

I had been periodically adding some water to the bag/soil mix so the roots wouldn't dry out.

Amazingly, they have been growing a little there in the dark and have survived quite well!

I only planted about half of each so far, 3 Giant Jersey Knight, and 3 Mary Washingtons.

Still have 3 of the Jersey Knights and 5 of the Mary Washingtons which came 8 in a bag instead of 6.

I just have to remember to keep adding soil over the top of them and keep them moist so they don't dry out in late summer.

The Beefsteak Tomatoes and another variety I planted from seed a month ago are growing quite well in the pots. Plants are still tiny so I will have a late harvest.

I have brought Tomato plants inside before Winter and they have done quite well.

I have over wintered Pepper plants successfully too and moved them back out in the Spring for an abundant crop.
No. 61     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 21, 2016 at 9:05 PM     
Sandy Leaf Lettuce
Sweet-tasting award winner


Write your own review

30-50 days. All-America Selections winner with exceptional disease and bolt resistance. Attractive oakleaf type produces lots of sweet-tasting, frilly, dark green leaves. Not bitter when heat-stressed.

1,000 seeds sows a 16-ft. row.

$1.99 per 1,000 seeds.

http://www.henryfields.com/product/sandy-leaf-lettuce/lettuce_seed

No. 62     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 21, 2016 at 10:29 PM     
Here's one I will have to order and try. My Grandparents on my Dad's side were from Yugoslavia (Slovenia, like Trump's Wife). So that makes me half Yugoslavian. This is an Heirloom variety.

YUGOSLAVIAN RED BUTTERHEAD LETTUCE

"55 days - Extremely decorative, this beautiful butterhead produces burgundy tinged leaves on loose heads. Sweet and tender; a wonderful addition to the salad bowl. - PKT. - 200 seeds"

$2.00 per 200 seeds.

http://heirloomseeds.com/yugoslavian-red-butterhead-lettuce.html

No. 63     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 21, 2016 at 10:56 PM     
Having trouble growing certain fruits or vegetables? Take advantage of the many free growing guides and articles by various seed companies.

Here's a bunch of them by the Territorial Seed Company.

http://www.territorialseed.com/category/spring_growing_guides/1

Also request their free colored catalog, it's huge!

http://www.territorialseed.com/catalog_request
No. 64     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 22, 2016 at 12:29 AM     
I have a lawn out in back and have been thinking, "why"?

I cut the grass, pull the weeds, cut the trees down that eventually grow there.

I am thinking about planting a Garden back there, or at least in part of it. It does get lots of sun back there, not a full day, but enough.

Cutting up the grass/turf would be a big project in itself, but I have done that before having turned part of my parents back lawn into a huge garden once.

The biggest problem is what to plant that the local kids wouldn't steal before I even had a chance to harvest anything. I wouldn't care if they took some of them, but not all. A tall variety would be good, so they can't reach the tops.

Elderberries maybe, they get 8-10' tall and grow in partial sun.

http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=5531

So having though about the various options I am leaning towards some sort of fruit trees or bushes. Something that would produce thousands of fruits, no way they could pick them all.

Some Blackberries alongside my mobile home and underneath the windows would be good, varieties WITH thorns!

2 Varieties come to mind here in the north, "Everbearing Darrow" & "Kiowa". The Kiowas produce HUGE Blackberries-->> http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=2632

Some tall Blueberry bushes maybe. Or a small self-pollinating Cherry Tree.

Maybe some Goji Berries along the chain link fence. Goji berries are loaded with Vitamin C and are one of the hihest antioxidant foods.

http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=4916


Or maybe some "Reliance Seedless Grapes" along the fence.

http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=5909

No. 65     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 22, 2016 at 1:00 AM     
4 Seasons Nursery here in central IL has a good free handbook on planting dormant bare root trees and plants ordered through the mail from nurseries.

Read it! http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/handbook.asp
No. 66     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 22, 2016 at 2:25 AM     
Stark Bros, a Nursery that has been in business for 200 years has a good growing guide for Fruit & Nut Trees, Berries, Grapes, and other things.

Very extensive and all free! http://www.starkbros.com/growing-guide
No. 67     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 27, 2016 at 10:33 AM     
Came home this morning after being gone since Saturday and checked the gardens. Piles of Red Raspberries waiting to be picked. I ate handfuls of them, maybe too many.

I tossed a number of over ripe ones in key places along the fenceline hoping they will grow next year.

And yet there are still quite a few unripe ones which should be ready later this week.

The Tomato plants I bought are growing very good. As are the ones I planted from seed too.

I noticed the Asparagus Roots I planted about a week ago shot up. They are way to thin to eat though and probably won't be ready for munching on for another few years. My job over the next few years is to make sure they stay alive until then.

The Green Leaf Lettuce is almost ready to start cutting with scissors.

Will do some gardening today or tomorrow after I wake up.
No. 68     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 10:28 PM     
Was just reading up on planting Asparagus. I did not know this plant gets up to 4-6' tall and produces berries. The good news is the leaf and branch structure is very thin so won't shade out my nearby veggies.

Once an Asparagus bed is established you can count on it producing Spears every spring for the next 20-30 years!

A good article on growing Asparagus:

http://www.gardeners.com/how-to/growing-asparagus/7343.html

No. 69     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 10:30 PM     
Another good site with a big collection of articles on how to grow vegetables and many other plants:

http://www.gardeners.com/how-to?folder=2004
No. 70     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 12:31 AM     
Since Sweet Potatoes were and are an almost daily staple of the Okinawans who lived to be 100, it might be a good idea to grow some!

You can use common store bought Sweet Potatoes.

Here's how you do it, first, with a 6th grade science experiment! You grow, "Slips" in a glass of water with toothpicks.

Then you break them off and plant them in loose soil.

http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/outdoors/gardening/how-to-plant-and-grow-sweet-potatoes
No. 71     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 8, 2016 at 9:20 PM     
Planted the last of my Asparagus crowns yesterday. I am surprised they lasted as long as they did in a plastic bag outside in a cabinet on the deck. The bags did have a little soil in them and I kept them mopist for over a month.

The "Sweet 100" cherry Tomato plant I planted int he ground is growing real good and has a few dozen small Tomatoes on it with many flowers so more on the way!

The Patio Tomato plant in a container on the deck is growing some good sized Tomatoes too.

The Cucumbers and Summer Squash and Zucchini plants are all growing good, including the one in a 5 gallon bucket.

One thing I did different this year is punch a number of 3/4" holes all the way down in the dirt all along the inside of the 5 gallon and other containers so the soil and roots can, "breathe" better and prevent root rot. I used a 3/4" piece of electrical conduit to make the holes.

Have some Tomato plants I started from seed in pots that are ready to be transplanted into the ground. Beefsteak and a few others.

Started some California Wonder Bell peppers from seed again since for some reason the ones I tried starting awhile back didn't make it and never sprouted. Soil might have dried out in the pots or something.

The plants seem to like this and are healthier. Eventually I
No. 72     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 9, 2016 at 3:56 PM     
I was checking my gardens this morning and noticed the Sweet 100 cherry Tomatoes produce in clusters of 10 at a time. There are lots of them forming and numerous flowers for ones that haven't yet formed.

Soon I should be swimming in cherry Tomatoes! No more buying them for awhile.
No. 73     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 12, 2016 at 3:30 PM     
Spent about 4 hours outside doing needed chores.

First I got the 16' extension ladder out, and climbed up the Maple tree and hammered some big landscaping spikes into the sides so I could climb even further up where the ladder couldn't reach.

This branch has to go because it's blocking out my Solar panels! :crybaby::no-no:

Then sawed all the way around the thick 8" branch girdling it in order to kill it. I did this last year but apparently not good enough, the branch had survived.

This time I made 2 parallel cuts all the way around going deeper than before. Then chipped out the middle in pieces with a 1" wide wood chisel.

I think this time I did the job and should start seeing the leaves dying within a few weeks.:party:
No. 74     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 12, 2016 at 3:41 PM     
Next project was I started building a frame on the deck for a waist high, maybe a little higher bench where I can put all kinds of pots, flats, and such in order to grow veggies. This will give me a LOT more room to grow them being it is about 3.5' x about 12' long.

Still have a little reinforcing to install on it but it feels pretty stout and should hold hundreds of lbs of dirt.

Have to go to the lumber yard and pick up some more wood for the top. will likely make the top out of slats so it can breathe better, more circulation around the plants.

Will rent a truck they have for $19.95. Have a few 4'x 8' sheets of plywood to get for the shed too.

And maybe go to the mini warehouse and pick up, drop off some stuff there.

Will likely get some bulk food at Gordon foods while i'm at it, then divide it up into mylar bags in 5 gallon buckets and in smaller mylar bags too, then pop some Oxygen absorbers into them and seal them all with a hot iron.

It will last for many years.

No. 75     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 12, 2016 at 3:45 PM     
The last of the Asparagus crowns I planted last week seem to be coming up.

Transplanted 3 Tomato plants in pots I grew from seed into the ground.

Placed wire cages around the Cucumber & Squash plants.

Thoroughly watered it all.

I have a big Italian sweet pepper in a pot ready to pick any day now.
No. 76     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 12, 2016 at 4:01 PM     
My goal is to turn the entire deck into a Greenhouse before Winter!

That way I can keep growing things inside it for a few more months.

Will insulate the floor.

Install water barrels and paint them black. during the day they absorb heat from the sun and release it at night keeping the greenhouse warm.

Have to reinforce under the deck though to support hundreds of gallons of water!

Here is the material I want use for the roof and sides:

http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/product/easy-ship-2-ft-wide-twinwall-polycarbonate/plastic-greenhouse-film



If you order it in 2' wide x 6' long sheets it can ship UPS.

They sell much larger sizes but they have to be shipped truck freight.

It comes in 2 thicknesses, 6mm or 8mm. I will get the 8mm since it is the same price as the 6mm.

I'll start with doing just the roof.

And if I can't afford to do all the sides by winter I might temporarily install this stuff on the sides, then order a side of the above twinwall insulated sheets and do only one side at a time and remove this from the side first. So do it in phases:

http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/product/solar-max-reinforced-poly-film/plastic-greenhouse-film

No. 77     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 12, 2016 at 4:07 PM     
It comes in triple wall, 2 insulated chambers but it is very pricey!

http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/product/polycarbonate-panel-8mm-triple-wall/plastic-greenhouse-film

No. 78     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 12, 2016 at 7:31 PM     
I just ordered some fruit plants from a Nursery in central IL: http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/index.aspI have ordered from them in the past. Most of these plants are shipped in a dormant condition from their coolers. I have had mixed results ordering from them in the past. Some plants died, some lived.

They do offer a 1 year replacement guarantee though.

And a 14 day money back guarantee so not worried if some don't make it i'm covered.

Here'.s what I ordered:

25 pep start pills. These are special fertilizer pills that won't harm roots and you drop one in the hole with your plant at planting time. They feed for up to 2 years.

http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=8311

Blackberry, Everbearing Darrow, 3 brambles for $9.99.

"Here's a real taste delight! The Darrow Blackberry was developed at the New York Experimental Station to bring you the best in flavor and spectacular crops year after year. The berries themselves are exceptionally large and sugar sweet. One of the most winter hardy blackberries! Ripen early and continue over a large period.

Proved 100% fruitful. Sweet Darrow Blackberry bushes are very thrifty, vigorous growing bushes that are exceptionally hardy -- having withstood temperatures of 22 below zero. The bushes are upright with very strong canes, being able to hold up a heavy crop without breaking down. Quick Crop Plants, 2 - year transplanted. Special reduced quantity prices!"

Lighting: sun
Plant Height: 4-7'
Ground Condition: well drained
Spread: 3-5'
Hardiness Zone: 4-8

http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=6151

1 Sugar Sweet Cherry $4.49...

"Sugar Sweet cherry is an extra sweet, extra delicious dark, ruby-red bush cherry. Wonderful tasting fruits have the sweetness of Bing, but Sugar Sweet cherry is more crack-resistant and produces a better quality cherry. Simply delicious eating! Sugar Sweet cherry is a van type variety cherry that is self-pollinating, and it is one of the best pollinators for other types of cherries. Produces large yields at an early age. We ship 12-18" plants."

Lighting: sun
Plant Height: 6-10'
Ground Condition: well drained
Spread: 6'
Hardiness Zone: 2-8

http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=5543


Catawba Red Grape $3.99...

"Catawba Grape is a late season grape, specially selected for the North, produces not only highly prized jams and jellies but fine red wines and champagne also. The medium-to-large size red fruit keeps well and is widely planted for their sweet, rich taste.

Self-fruitful, a pollinator is unnecessary but the vine will do even better by planting two. Does best in zone 5 to the cooler parts of 8.

Other varieties selected for the North include Niagara and Concord.

This Catawba grape is also offered in the Red, White and Blue Collection.

Grapes in general: Grapes are easy to grow and with a little careful effort the home gardener will be rewarded with large crops of fruit, perfect for wine, jams and fresh eating. Grape vines usually begin producing fruit the second or third year after planting and a mature vine will produce 15-20 pounds annually. These vines also have desirable ornamental value and are an ideal, natural privacy screen."

Lighting: sun
Plant Height: 4-10'
Ground Condition: Well drained
Spread: 8'
Hardiness Zone: 5 - 8

http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=6304

Concord Grape $3.99...

"Another grape specially selected for the North, the Concord is the American standard bearer! It consistently produces good crops of large blue-black grapes which are tops for jam and jellies. A mid-season bearer, it is widely planted for its sweet, rich taste.

Self-fruitful, a pollinator is unnecessary but the vine will do even better by planting two. Does best in zone 5 to the cooler parts of 8.

Grapes in general: Grapes are easy to grow and with a little careful effort the home gardener will be rewarded with large crops of fruit, perfect for wine, jams and fresh eating. Grape vines usually begin producing fruit the second or third year after planting and a mature vine will produce 15-20 pounds annually. These vines also have desirable ornamental value and are an ideal, natural privacy screen."

http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=6305

Patriot Blueberry $7.29...

"Berries as large as a quarter! Huge, sweet fruit on this early season variety. One of the most popular blueberries in the U.S. It is also an excellent ornamental shrub with snow white blossoms and bright red fall color on a compact 4’ x 4’ bush. One of the best varieties available for adaptability, hardiness, disease resistance and big yields of large, delicious fruit. Zone 4-8."

Lighting: sun
Plant Height: 4'
Ground Condition: well drained, acidic
Spread: 4'
Hardiness Zone: 4-8

http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=3272

Shipping: $9.99.

Tax: $2.80.

Total: $47.53.
No. 79     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 12, 2016 at 7:54 PM     
Sorry Californians, the Sugar Sweet Cherry Bush I ordered cannot be shipped there. :sorry:

http://www.4seasonsnurseries.com/detail.asp?pid=5543

It could be smuggled in though since there is currently no "Border" check there....yet.
No. 80     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 12, 2016 at 9:47 PM     
Burpee has an excellent how to guide on growing, storing, and cooking Asparagus. http://www.burpee.com/gardenadvicecenter/vegetables/asparagus/all-about-asparagus/article10204.html
No. 81     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 23, 2016 at 6:24 PM     
Well all the plants I ordered arrived in today's Mail.

I found them in the mailbox as I was leaving for work this afternoon. It will be a miracle if they survive the 5 to 7 hours they were in the hot aluminum mailbox.

I quickly added some water to a 5 gallon bucket that had some mud in it, tore a hole in each bag and plunged them into the water overnight until I get back tomorrow.

Most of them appeared to be shipped bare root. Which means they were/are in dormancy in a cooler just before shipping.

A few of them had some soil/peat moss in the bag.

Each set of plants were wrapped in a bag around their roots.

Will see how many and which ones survived after planting them all tomorrow when I get home from work.

Not worried since they do have a good guarantee.
No. 82     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 24, 2016 at 12:33 AM     
Well that Nursery's instructions say to soak the bare root plants in water for 2 to 24 hours so they should be ok until tomorrow when I get back home. They will have soaked for 19 hours.
No. 83     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 24, 2016 at 12:44 AM     
My Red Raspberry Brambles that have been in the ground for years now I have pruned readying them for next year's crop.

However they have grown away from one area I want them in and some are now growing up where I don't want them to be, in the lawn area.

So there are a few ways of multiplying them and moving or replanting them.

Much of this info can apply to many different types of fruits or vegetables.

Here is a good article on Propagation: http://www.backwoodshome.com/propagating-plants/
No. 84     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 24, 2016 at 4:46 PM     
Well I was able to get all the bare root plants that arrived in yesterdays mail planted unto the ground.

The Sugar sweet cherry bush was already already breaking dormancy after soaking it overnight in water you could see the buds swelling and growing..

Took me an hour and a half to get it all planted.

I popped a pep start tablet in each hole before planting.

This is a special timed release fertilizer which won't harm or burn delicate feeder roots like regular fertilier would. The pills are good for up to 2 years.

Now we just weed, water, sit back and cross our fingers and wait and see if they all grow!
No. 85     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 28, 2016 at 4:22 PM     
The Sugar Sweet Cherry bush is now sprouting small leaves.

So far it is the only thing doing anything.

I did make a minor cut on the side of the bark of the grape vines, and there is live tissue underneath so they are not dead.

It is a trick they recommend to determine whether a dormant plant is alive or dead.

The others are too small to take a chance on slicing.

They said to wait as long as a month and a have before giving up on any plant. Sometimes it takes that long for some to come out of dormancy.

No. 86     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 29, 2016 at 8:15 PM     
After doing a little research I read it is very common for fruit trees and berry brambles to take 4 to 6 weeks before showing signs of breaking dormancy.

Since it appears I may have a long wait before seeing any growth.

Well being it's only been 5 days since I planted them I feel better. I was getting worried not seeing them do anything except for that cherry bush which seems to be growing like gangbusters!
No. 87     Reply: Gardening   
By:  Grace595   Gender: F   Age: 55   on  Jul 30, 2016 at 12:09 AM     
My sister bought a home today which comes with vegetable and flower gardens. :smile:
No. 88     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 30, 2016 at 5:18 AM     
Grace595 wrote:

My sister bought a home today which comes with vegetable and flower gardens. :smile:


A previous owner where I live had planted Tulips in a few spots and they come uo every year.

When I move someone will be blessed with lots of free fruit and Asparagus every year.

I will dig up some of or make cuttings of whay I have planted though ti take with me to my new location.
No. 89     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jul 30, 2016 at 11:41 AM     
The other day I ate my first ripe cherry Tomato off of the Sweet 100 plant I have. I found out a Sweet 100 cherry Tomato plant can produce up to 1,000 tomatoes per plant! :icon_eek:

Based on past experience growing this variety I believe it!

It is now about 6 'tall. As are the summer squash and Zuchinni plants. Fruits are just starting to form.
No. 90     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 9, 2016 at 12:52 AM     
Well today since i'm off after working 7 days staright I make a trip to Menard's too pick up a 40lb bag of Compost/Manure.

I will bring a big old Italian Army Ruck Sack to fit that in to carry on the Bus and a few blocks home.

Also picking up a canister of Rooting Hormone, maybe some Miracid.

And any veggies, crowns, or fruit brambles they may have marked down for peanuts on sale that look salvageable.

Today me and Jesus work in the gardens and am moving some solar panels out from under the big tree and onto the mobile home roof into better sunlight.
No. 91     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 9, 2016 at 5:08 PM     
Well I went to walmart instead since I had to get some RIT dye to dye my uniform pants that have faded already after 2 months.

So I bought a 40lb bag of manure/humus mix. They did not have any plain manure grhh. The manure/humus mix is 10% manure, 90% humus. It was only $1.67 though.

Also picked up a 3.75 bag of dried chicken manure. I figure that might help make up for the weak manure/humus mix.

Also got the can of rooting hormone for making cuttings!

Some Spinach and Snow Pea seeds. Both of those are cool Fall Weather crops.

I walked over to a local Sonic and ordered a Hamburger. She said it was only $2.00! :icon_eek: I was baffled. I asked her whey so cheap? It said $3.99 on the menu. She said they are half price every Tuesday!

SO I will be doing my Walmart shopping on Tuesdays from now on! :ban_dance:
No. 92     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 9, 2016 at 5:14 PM     
I stuffed the 40lb bag of manure into the rucksack. It fit after squishing it a bit plus there was room for more stuff.

As Murphy's law would have it, the right shoulder strap of the old Italian Army Rucksack broke on the bottom while I was on the Bus.

There was a rotted old leather piece that pulled apart.

I quickly tied it to a smaller side strap and it got me the 4 blocks home despite having to carry about 50+ pounds.

Will have to repair it sometime with that sewing awl I bought. It will do the job. I think I have some old broken leather belts I can use for the material.
No. 93     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 9, 2016 at 5:25 PM     
After getting home I fed the manure and chicken manure to the Asparagus, Tomato plants, Squash and Cucumber plants, Onions, Peppers, etc.

I then thoroughly watered everything.

Also got the mini irrigation sprayer hooked up and operational for the Squash, Cucumber, and Cherry Tomato plants.

The Squash plants are now 8' tall on the poles I have them growing vertically on.

The cherry tomato plants are about 7' tall. There were half a dozen ripe ones which I promptly ate.

The squash and cucumber vines have small 1" long fruits so far. But it won't be long now after fertilizing and watering them and they will start growing like crazy.

I have been watching the various Bumblebees, Sweat bees, and other small bees pollinating the flowers, even ants and wasps are diving in there.

All this fearmongering about the honeybee collapse syndrome is panic over nothing. We will not starve, fruits and veggies will still be pollinated by other species.
'
They have since found out the cause of honeybee colonies collapsing.

It is the pesticides the Farmers have been using.
No. 94     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Aug 9, 2016 at 6:20 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:


The Squash plants are now 8' tall on the poles I have them growing vertically on.

The cherry tomato plants are about 7' tall. There were half a dozen ripe ones which I promptly ate.
thats impressive, seven foot tall tomatoes plants... the girlies ought ta be beatin yer door down...
No. 95     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 9, 2016 at 8:15 PM     
crayons wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:


The Squash plants are now 8' tall on the poles I have them growing vertically on.

The cherry tomato plants are about 7' tall. There were half a dozen ripe ones which I promptly ate.
thats impressive, seven foot tall tomatoes plants... the girlies ought ta be beatin yer door down...


It is common for this, "Sweet 100" variety to get that tall. If trained on a trellis or poles. I grew them in my late teens and they were over 8' tall.

The plant has been known to produce up to 1,000 cherry tomatoes. They get to be about the width of a quarter.

Since where I have them planted they are only getting less than a half day of sun I will not have anywhere near that many. But there are probably already over 100 tomatoes on it. After feeding it that chicken manure it should popup even more.

There is a vining variety of tomato I have read about called, "Triple Crop" which can get up to 25' tall if trained on poles or strings:

http://www.totallytomato.com/dp.asp?pID=00380&c=40

Might be good for growing along the top of a chain link fence or something.

It can produce 2-3 bushels of 6" wide tomatoes!

It is a Beefsteak type Heirloom tomato which means it is open pollinated, you can save the seeds from one year to the next and it will produce the same variety.
No. 96     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Aug 9, 2016 at 9:10 PM     
i captured/bookmarked the heirloom supertomato link... i've got
the perfect fence and a spring that popped up with plenty of drainage for next year, will be ordering!

and i understand about the pollination, i have buku's of wasps, hornets
and sugar bees (NOT honey bees) and they're all scavengers... but they
are getting clean water not chemical water, if they were getting chemical
water i'd have to kill em all. chemical water makes these creatures crazy.

They respect my presence and only go after other two legged intruders.
No. 97     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 9, 2016 at 9:27 PM     
crayons wrote:

i captured/bookmarked the heirloom supertomato link... i've got
the perfect fence and a spring that popped up with plenty of drainage for next year, will be ordering!

and i understand about the pollination, i have buku's of wasps, hornets
and sugar bees (NOT honey bees) and they're all scavengers... but they
are getting clean water not chemical water, if they were getting chemical
water i'd have to kill em all. chemical water makes these creatures crazy.

They respect my presence and only go after other two legged intruders.


There are lots of companies out there that sell the triple L Crop heirloom seeds.

I have a chain link fence belonging to the factory next door I could grow it along. I wouldn't care if the local mexican kiddies/brats even picked them all! And they would get a full day sun on that fence.

If I were to grow them being there is no way I could eat 2-3 Bushels of beefsteak tomatoes I personally would can what I didn't eat on sandwiches.

I would make salsa of various types out of it!

A plain old water bath canner is all that's needed.

One could sell, barter, or give away the many beefsteak tomatoes.

This variety is also called "Italian Tree Tomato"
No. 98     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Aug 9, 2016 at 10:02 PM     
laughin))) go you mixed up siciliano's
all you calabriase's do the mambo like the crazy's

hey mambo italiano............ whoooo!
No. 99     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 9, 2016 at 10:44 PM     
http://heirloomseeds.com/tomatoes/tomatoes-o-z/trip-l-crop-tomato.html
No. 100     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 16, 2016 at 1:28 AM     
The squash plants are now sticking off the end of the tall poles and have run out out of vertical room. I could pinch off the top which would cause more side growth or run some strung over to the roof edge and let them continue to grow on top of the roof. Might try ine of each way.
No. 101     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 102   on  Aug 21, 2016 at 12:50 PM     
BF -- reading backwards to some of your posts...we had asparagus that grew wild and was very tall in Utah near a small creek (was the neighbor's, but they shared with us). Yummy!

Sandy leaf lettuce ... is that because it can grow in dry climates (sandy soil)? I have a form of lettuce growing in my yard now, but I do not know what it is.

Gardening blues:

I found out why my "gigantic" hill of red apple is dying after it was fine for 5 years! It's a disease affecting all of San Diego. . A mold spore.

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/2016/feb/19/disease-taking-toll-on-ice-plant/

So here I have replanted with red apple (which was the wrong thing to do since the new ones could have the spores and carry them further...only 1/2 of my red apple has died)...

A friend came over and she planted different plants she purchases for me (I did legal work for her and she wanted to help me with my gardening). Anyway ... she was very intuitive (but it appears 1/2 of what she planted is affected and not growing)?

Now I have to consider other types of plants for a large area that require little to no maintenance (it's a large area and huge project). I am fortunate that not all my plants died off as growers from Evergreen here stated they had no red apples because of the disease wiped out growers entire crops.

I had enough on my property to be a grower (but 1/2 have died and my neighbor and I were trying to figure out what happened...

This disease is probably what affected my plum tree (the one I mourned) as well...

I just told my Mom that they seem to do better when I do not water them (the article states it spreads the spore...so mystery solved)!

It happened right after the rain in July (and we all kept asking why "needed" rain was killing our plants. Now we know. Ugh. A hard blow this year.

No. 102     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 27, 2016 at 2:34 AM     
I was just reading through this new book I got called, "Vertical Gardening" and read there is a type of, Spinach that grows on a vine up to 10' tall and is heat and drought tolerant also. The more leaves you pick the more leaves it produces!

While it is not a true spinach like conventional english spinach it looks and is shaped just like regular spinach. Used just like spinach also. And is loaded with numerous vitamins and minerals.

It is commonly used in Indian and Asian cooking.

Here's the low down on this wonder vegetable.

Malabar Spinach



Basella (vine spinach) nutrition facts

Basella or vine spinach is a popular tropical leafy-green vegetable commonly grown as backyard plant in the home gardens. In the true sense, it is different from English spinach (Spinacea oleracea) in that the plant is a creeping vine, and its leaves feature glossy, broad, deep green, thick, and mucilaginous. Commonly found in the backyard gardens of many south Asian families, it is gaining popularity in some of the tropical and temperate climates of America, Australia and Europe for its succulent, nutritious greens, and tender stems.

Vine spinach belongs to the Basellaceae family, and has two chief cultivars, Basella alba, which features green-stems and deep-green leaves, and Basella rubra with purplish-stems and deep-green leaves with pink veins.

basella alba and rubra
Vine spinach. Note for both Basella alba and rubra types; pink stems and green leaves in B. rubra.


Vine spinach is noted by regional names in different regions in Asia. Some of the common names for this herb are Ceylon spinach, Malabar spinach, saan choy (Chinese), mong toi (Vietnamese), alugbati (Philippines), pui saag (Bengali), remayong (Malay), etc. It is native to south Asia, probably originated in the monsoon fed tropical regions of Malabar Coast of India and Sri Lanka.
basella -malabar spinach
Malabar-spinach (Basella rubra) vine. Note for pink stems and green leaves.
Photo courtesy: scott.zona

The plant is a perennial vine and grown as annual or biennial pot-herb. It prefers hot humid climate and moist, fertile, well-drained soil to flourish. Although, its seeds can be sown directly for planting, usually thick cuttings about the length of 20 cm are preferred for easy propagation, and fast growth. Being a vine, the plant requires trellising for its spread at a faster rate. It bears white or white-pink color tiny flowers depending upon the species and deep-purple to black color berries.

Basella alba bears thick, fleshy, broad, oval to heart-shaped leaves all along its vine length. Basella rubra features pink or purplish stems and pink color veins running in the leaves. In either case, leaves and terminal tender, 8-12 inches stems are ready for harvesting about 35 to 45 days after planting (about 50 days after seeding).


Health benefits of Basella (vine spinach)


Basella is one of versatile leaf green vegetable and revered in some East Asian cultures for its wholesome phyto-nutrients profile.

Basella is very low in calories and fats (100 g of raw leaves provide just 19 calories). Nonetheless, it holds an incredibly good amount of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

Fresh leaves, particularly of basella rubra, are rich sources of several vital carotenoid pigment anti-oxidants such as ß-carotene, lutein, zea-xanthin. Together, these compounds help act as protective scavengers against oxygen-derived free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that play a healing role in aging and various disease processes.

Its thick, fleshy leaves are a good source of non-starch polysaccharide, mucilage. In addition to regular fiber (roughage) that found in the stem and leaves, mucilage facilitates in smooth digestion, bring reduction in cholesterol absorption, and help prevent bowel movement problems.

Vine spinach leaves and stem are incredibly rich sources of vitamin A. 100 g fresh leaves provide 8000 IU or 267% of recommended daily allowance (RDA) of this vitamin. Vitamin-A is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin, and essential for good eye-sight. Consumption of natural vegetables and fruits rich in vitamin-A, and flavonoids has been thought to offer protection from the lung and oral cavity cancers.

Basella has more vitamin C content than English spinach. 100 g of fresh greens contains 102 mg or 102% of daily recommended levels of vitamin C. Vitamin-C is a powerful antioxidant, which helps the body develop resistance against infectious agents and scavenge harmful oxygen-free radicals.

Likewise in spinach, basella too is an excellent source of iron. 100 g fresh leaves contain about 1.20 mg or 15% of daily intake of iron. Iron is an important trace element required by the human body for red blood cell (RBC's) production. Additionally, this element acts as a co-factor for oxidation-reduction enzyme, cytochrome-oxidase, during the cellular metabolism.

It also contains good amounts of many B-complex vitamins such as folate, vitamin-B6 (pyridoxine), and riboflavin. 100 g fresh leaves provide 140 µg or 35% of folates. This vitamin is one of the essential compounds for DNA production and growth. Folate deficiency in during very early stages of pregnancy might results in the neural tube defects in the newborn baby. Anticipating and pregnant women are therefore, advised to include a lot of fresh greens in their diet to help prevent neural tube defects in the offspring.

Further, basella leaves are good sources of minerals like potassium (11% of RDA/100 g), manganese (32% of RDA/100 g), calcium, magnesium, and copper. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese and copper are used by the body as a co-factor for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase.

Akin to spinach, regular consumption of basella (Malabar spinach) in the diet helps prevent osteoporosis (weakness of bones), iron-deficiency anemia. Besides, it is believed to protect the body from cardiovascular diseases and cancers of colon.



See the table below for in depth analysis of nutrients:

Malabar spinach (Basella alba), raw,
Nutritive value per 100 g.
(Source: USDA National Nutrient data base) Principle

Nutrient Value Percentage of RDA
Energy 19 Kcal 1%
Carbohydrates 3.40 g 2.5%
Protein 1.80 g 3%
Total Fat 0.30 g 1.5%
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Vitamins
Folates 140 µg 35%
Niacin 0.500 mg 3%
Pantothenic acid 0.053 mg 1%
Pyridoxine 0.240 mg 18%
Riboflavin 0.155 mg 13%
Thiamin 0.050 mg 4%
Vitamin A 8000 IU 267%
Vitamin C 102 mg 170%
Electrolytes
Sodium 24 mg 1.5%
Potassium 510 mg 11%
Minerals
Calcium 109 mg 11%
Copper 0.107 mg 12%
Iron 1.20 mg 15%
Magnesium 65 mg 16%
Manganese 0.735 mg 32%
Selenium 0.8 µg 1.5%
Zinc 0.43 mg 4%

Selection and storage

Fresh Malabar spinach can be readily available in the tropical belt all around the seasons. However, in the US and European markets only selected groceries, specializing in selling Asian vegetables and herbs, display fresh basella types (green and purple). In the stores, look for fresh harvest featuring shiny, succulent leaves, and firm stems. The green has no special flavor of its own, however, once cooked, it mixes well with other ingredients in the food, in addition to conferring gel-like consistency to the food.

Avoid sunken, dry, bruised, and discolored leaves.

Basella has a relatively good shelf life. At home, untie the bushel, wrap the leaves in a damp cloth and place in air-tight zip-pouch or plastic bag and store inside the refrigerator set at high relative humidity.

Although the greens can be stored inside the refrigerator for up to four days, fresh leaves should be eaten at the earliest in order to get maximum nutrition benefits.

Preparation and serving methods

Wash the leaves in cold running water to remove any surface grit/sand. Mop dry using paper towel or soft cotton cloth. Trim away tough stems. Chop the leaves and stem for the desired length to add in the recipes.

Basella is used in the same way as other seasonal greens like spinach, watercress, and purslane. However, being more mucilaginous, it adds thick, glue-like consistency to the recipes.

Here are some serving tips:

The greens are mixed with other popular greens to prepare "saag" in India and Bangladesh (pui shaak), with added lentils or seafood. Its flower and seed heads (pui seeds) are also edible, and being used to prepare recipes with seasonal seafood.

In the southern parts of India, Malaysia, Indonesia, China, and Sri Lanka, its leaves and stem are used in numerous variations to prepare curries, stews, soups, etc., and eaten with rice, bread (roti), and noodles.
In the Philipphines where the greens known as alugbati, are being used to prepare mouth-watering stir-fries, with meat, and vegetables.


Safety profile

Phytates and dietary fiber present in the leaves may interfere with the bio-availability of iron, calcium and magnesium.

Like in spinach, basella too contains oxalic acid, a naturally-occurring substance found in some vegetables, which may crystallize as oxalate stones in the urinary tract in some people. People with known oxalate urinary tract stones are advised to avoid eating them. Adequate intake of water is, therefore, advised to maintain normal urine output. (Medical disclaimer)."

http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/basella.html
No. 103     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 27, 2016 at 3:13 AM     
Unlike regular spinach Red Malabar Spinach prefers high heat and humidity. It does not like temperatures below 80.

So it is perfect for a summer "Spinach" crop when it's hot out.

This place sells 50 seeds for $2.50. Seeds are viable for 4 years.

http://www.rareseeds.com/red-malabar-spinach/
No. 104     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 27, 2016 at 3:25 AM     
What Is Malabar Spinach: Tips For Growing And Using Malabar Spinach

By Amy Grant

Malabar spinach plant isn’t a true spinach [1], but its foliage does indeed resemble that green leafy vegetable. Also known as Ceylon spinach, climbing spinach, gui, acelga trapadora, bratana, libato, vine spinach and Malabar nightshade, Malabar spinach is a member of the Basellaceae family. Basella alba is a green leaf variety while the red leaf variety belongs to the B. rubra species, which has purplish stems. If not spinach proper, what then is Malabar spinach?

What is Malabar Spinach?

Malabar spinach plants grow in India and throughout the tropics, primarily in the moist lowlands. While the dark green leaves resemble those of spinach, this is a vine type of plant that thrives in hot temps, even exceeding 90 F. (32 C.) Cool temperatures cause Malabar spinach to creep. It is grown as an annual, but grows like a perennial in regions that are frost free.

Malabar Spinach Care

Malabar spinach will grow well in a variety of soil conditions but prefers a moist fertile soil with plenty of organic matter and a soil pH [2] of between 6.5 and 6.8. Malabar spinach plants can be grown in part shade, which increases the leaf size, but it much prefers hot, humid and full sun exposures.

Malabar spinach also needs constant moisture to prevent the blossoming, which will turn the leaves bitter — ideally an area with a warm, rainy climate for optimal Malabar spinach care and growth.

The vine should be trellised and two plants are sufficient for most families through the summer and fall growing season. It can even be grown up the same trellis as peas [3], truly utilizing the garden space. Grown as an ornamental edible, the vines can be trained to climb over doorways. To prune Malabar spinach, simply cut the thick, fleshy leaves while retaining some stem.

How to Grow Malabar Spinach

Malabar spinach can be grown from either seeds or cuttings. If the stems are too tough to eat when pruning, simply put them back into the soil where they will re-root.

Scarify the seed with a file, sandpaper or even a knife to speed germination, which will take three weeks or longer at temperatures between 65-75 F. (18-24 C.). Direct sow Malabar spinach seeds in USDA zone [4] 7 or warmer, two to three weeks after the last frost date.

If you live in a chillier zone, start the seeds indoors at about six weeks before the last frost. Wait to transplant until the soil has warmed and there is no chance of frost. Transplant the seedlings spaced about a foot apart.

Using Malabar Spinach

Once you have a good crop to harvest, using Malabar spinach is just like using regular spinach greens. Delicious cooked, Malabar spinach is not as slimy as some other greens. In India, it is cooked with spicy chilies, chopped onion and mustard oil. Found frequently in soups, stir-fries and curries, Malabar spinach holds up better than regular spinach and doesn’t wilt as rapidly.

Although when it is cooked it tastes much like spinach, Malabar spinach raw is a revelation of the juicy, crisp flavors of citrus and pepper. It is delicious mixed in with other greens in tossed salads.

However you use Malabar spinach, this discovery is a boon for those of us that love our greens but find the warm days of summer a bit too hot for their taste. Malabar spinach has its place in the kitchen garden, providing cool, crisp greens for the long, hot summer days.

http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/vegetables/malabar-spinach/growing-malabar-spinach.htm/?print=1&loc=bot
No. 105     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 27, 2016 at 3:30 AM     
Johnny's Selected Seeds has Red Malabar Spinach also, 100 seeds for $3.95:

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-6044-red-malabar-spinach.aspx
No. 106     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 27, 2016 at 3:35 AM     
I also read in the book Vertical Gardening that both Summer & Winter Squash do well growing vertically.

With the heavier Winter Squash varieties though you will need to provide some, "Slings" to hold up each Squash. Pantyhose I know works good, nylon nettings, home made slings out of string, etc.

Even Spaghetti Squash grows well vertically he says and can produce up to 15 big Squashes per plant!
No. 107     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 27, 2016 at 3:40 AM     
Sweet Potatoes he says also grow well vertically.

Obviously the Tubers grow underground but the Vine will grow vertically up a pole if you train and prune it.

All you need is 1 plain old store bought sweet potato to get started growing some, "Slips".

Cut it in half, stick 4 or more toothpicks horizontally on the sides of it.

Place the cut end in a glass of water with the other half of the sweet potato suspended above the water in the air.

Soon you will see some, "Slips" growing roots in the water and a plant in the air.

You simply remove these then plant them in the ground and presto!

Next year I will be growing some sweet potatoes vertically.
No. 108     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 27, 2016 at 3:47 AM     
Joseph698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Well I finally did SOMETHING about planting some veggies this year! Just planted Delicious Tomato, Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce, Green Salad Bowl Lettuce, Bloomsdale Longstanding Spinach, a 4 variety package of Radishes, and Pickling Cucumbers. I planted everything in pots on the deck so far. Still have to pull all the weeds out of the grden bed and plant something there yet.

Well it's a start anyway and better late than never! KI:dance:



well done, its therapeutic; i love gardening but unfortunately dont have good health; using weedkillers years ago may have contributed when they didnt issue masks, it was part of my job. now my immunity is low


i still have a few things in pots outside to escape the slugs - do you have problems with those pesky things....I live in the UK btw ?


No, I have seen slugs on various plants in different backyards we have had but can't recall them ever being a problem in my gardens.

No. 109     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 27, 2016 at 3:51 AM     
The green Salad Bowl leaf lettuce I have planted in a long rectangular planter almost died this summer almost a month ago but since then I manured and composted it and it really took off like a rocket and recovered.

The weather cooling off a little played a large part in it i'm sure.

I am now picking or cutting the leaves off for my salads.

Time to plant some Spinach for a Fall crop. It did not do well in summer's heat and died!
No. 110     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 102   on  Aug 28, 2016 at 2:21 PM     
I purchased some coast sunflowers 1/2 off at home depot that I hoped I could save ... they look pretty dead right now (I used organic fertilizer and they just never recovered). Now to my $20.00 back they said I have to dig them back up (three larger plants) and bring them in for refund...lol...

I will not be buying plants that look unhealthy for 1/2 off again at home depot!

I still haven't found a spore killer that will not kill my massive amount of red apple either (although I've found several organic things I could try).

The land is too big for soakers and this watering in the day is ridiculously time consuming (if watering the dirt as recommended) due to having to move the hose every 5 minutes. The article I posted stated not to use the sprinklers. This is just sucking my days away though due to the land mass (size). While good for my Ebaying (it's keeping me house bound)...I'm online toooooo much as I have to keep moving the hose.

I need a spore killer!!!



No. 111     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  LynnQ4972   Gender: F   Age: 51   on  Aug 29, 2016 at 11:13 PM     
I have been blessed with quite a big tomato crop this year. I have canned 97 quarts and 17 pints and still going. Had lots of cucumbers.I am doing well with spaghetti squash,watermelons,cantalopes,blue potatoes and peppers too!!!!My cabbage was eaten by green caterpillars as well as my Brussel sprouts.My lettuce patch did great as well as my Swiss Chard!!Feeling Blessed!!!
No. 112     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 102   on  Aug 30, 2016 at 2:35 AM     
LynnQ4972 wrote:

I have been blessed with quite a big tomato crop this year. I have canned 97 quarts and 17 pints and still going. Had lots of cucumbers.I am doing well with spaghetti squash,watermelons,cantalopes,blue potatoes and peppers too!!!!My cabbage was eaten by green caterpillars as well as my Brussel sprouts.My lettuce patch did great as well as my Swiss Chard!!Feeling Blessed!!!


LynnQ! Wow, that is quite a garden (impressive)!

Blue potatoes? I've heard of purple potatoes and ube. Do the blue potatoes taste different?

That is a "lot" of canning as well! My Grandma used to can like you do (again impressive)!

No. 113     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Aug 30, 2016 at 9:55 AM     
We enjoy have a small garden ... some tomatoes, onions, green beans, and cucumbers. It doesn't take that much space to produce plenty of veggies.

I always look forward to the tomatoes ... I like eating tomato sandwiches.

:tongue:
No. 114     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 30, 2016 at 1:14 PM     
LynnQ4972 wrote:

I have been blessed with quite a big tomato crop this year. I have canned 97 quarts and 17 pints and still going. Had lots of cucumbers.I am doing well with spaghetti squash,watermelons,cantalopes,blue potatoes and peppers too!!!!My cabbage was eaten by green caterpillars as well as my Brussel sprouts.My lettuce patch did great as well as my Swiss Chard!!Feeling Blessed!!!


Now that's impressive!

Every single time I have tried to grow any Broccoli or Cabbage here in the midwest those green caterpillars eat them up like candy.

I hacve read you have to place netting around each plant in order to keep the caterpillaR
rs from gobbling them up. Then tie he netting firmly around the base of each plant.

I will be swimming in cukes soon. I plan on canning many of them I don't eat into pickles of various types. Mostly sliced, sweet, bread and butter, etc.
No. 115     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 30, 2016 at 1:33 PM     
Worked in the garden today. The Cucumber vines are 14' tall! :icon_eek:

I tied some string on the top of the 8' tall poles then ran the excess 6' long vines on top of the roof. The Raccoons, Possums, or Squirrels may get some up there but i'll have plenty. And it will make the vine stronger overall since it will get more sun up there.

I am starting to see dozens of little fruits. I picked one today and ate it with a salad.

I had to carefully dodge all the Bumblebees, sweat bees, and other stinging creatures that were busy pollinating all the flowers while I was on the ladder putting the vines up on the roof.

Had to trim out some of the side vines since they were choking out the Sweet100 cherry tomato plants.

I made the mistake of planting the tomato plants towards the wall and the cuuckes in fron of them not realizing the cukes were gonna get 14' tall!
No. 116     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 30, 2016 at 1:39 PM     
I made 3, 4' tall tomato cages out of some old rabbit fencing I had. Then placed them around the Beefsteak tomato plants which were sprawling over.

It takes me twice as long to grow anything because only get a halfday or less of sun between mobile homes and the tall factory building next door.

Plus I started a little late in the season

No. 117     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Aug 30, 2016 at 5:07 PM     
Went back out to do more gardening now that it is shaded on that side from the sun.

The vertical gardening book says once your vertical plants are tall enough you trim the lower leaves thus making room for shorter growing olants!

So I did just that and transplanted 4 green pepper plants in front of the cucumber vines.

Also tied up some cucumber vines higher ulp on poles in a 5 gallon pot I have on the deck.

Those have reached the roof as well. Lots of fruir has aet on that one. Small so far about 2" long but it won't be long before i'll be making pickles!
No. 118     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 102   on  Aug 30, 2016 at 6:01 PM     
I have a mystery plant!

I just posted a photo on facebook of the mystery leafy plant growing in my red blossoms! Hopefully someone might be able to identify it...

They (more than one) have popped up and do not look like weeds and have never been spotted for 5 years here before! :-p (Bees seem to like them as well).


No. 119     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 1, 2016 at 12:53 AM     
Went on the roof to check the Cucumber Vines and move some solar panels into a sunnier area and found a cat sitting on the roof of the mobile home.

He/she just stared at me for about a minute before bolting down the small tree he/she came up on.

It must be up there stalking birds.

Since I have a tin or galvanized metal roof (covered with tar) it reminds me of the saying, "Cat on a hot tin roof". Was that just a phrase or a song? :unsure:
No. 120     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 1, 2016 at 10:12 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Well I was able to get all the bare root plants that arrived in yesterdays mail planted unto the ground.

The Sugar sweet cherry bush was already already breaking dormancy after soaking it overnight in water you could see the buds swelling and growing..

Took me an hour and a half to get it all planted.

I popped a pep start tablet in each hole before planting.

This is a special timed release fertilizer which won't harm or burn delicate feeder roots like regular fertilier would. The pills are good for up to 2 years.

Now we just weed, water, sit back and cross our fingers and wait and see if they all grow!


Well after 5 weeks one of the grape vines I bought is finally sprouting/budding! It's a miracle! I just checked it this morning and found some new growth on it. :ban_dance:

So far only this one and the Cherry Bush are the only things showing any signs of life. Some of the others look dead But even if they are, they are guaranteed and they will send more if that is the case. We shall see. Am supposed to wait at least 6 weeks before filing any claim.

Hopefully, at least the other grape vine will bud too.

I have that rooting hormone now and if I have to reorder replacement plants I will try that hormone on them. It should help them form new roots faster.
No. 121     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 3, 2016 at 6:44 AM     
Bought a package of "Pickling Salt" at the Grocery store the other night.

Pickling salt does not have iodine or the anti-caking agents in it that regular table salt does.

You CAN use regular iodized table sale but the iodine in it will sometimes make it a funny color and sometimes give it an off taste and the anti-caking agents in it will make it cloudy.

Pickling salt is also known as, "Kosher Salt".

I already have a large canister of "Pickling Spices" I got from the same grocery store earlier this year.
No. 122     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  LynnQ4972   Gender: F   Age: 51   on  Sep 3, 2016 at 11:13 PM     
CaSandie,the purple or blue potatoes taste better than the white or yellow in my opinion.They also have more nutrients.You should try some if you get a chance!!
No. 123     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 4, 2016 at 12:25 AM     
LynnQ4972 wrote:

CaSandie,the purple or blue potatoes taste better than the white or yellow in my opinion.They also have more nutrients.You should try some if you get a chance!!


They had purple and blue potatoes at the Farmer's Market this morning.

Purple and yellow Cauliflower too.
No. 124     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Oct 16, 2016 at 2:00 AM     
Bought a special issue of Mother Earth News called, "Guide To Fall Gardening".

Has articles about Winter Gardening too.

It appears Kale, especially certain varieties are probably the hardiest Winter Vegetable there is.

So i'll have to try some in a cold frame/Greenhouse I have yet to build.

Running out of time but I think I should have enough time by next payday to order some Greenhouse Plastic and a few special clamps. I already have a bunch of EMT conduit so these clamps snap around them holding the plastic in place. $5 for 10 clamps 3-4" wide depending on if you order ones for 1/2" EMT or 3/4" EMT conduit. Works with plastic piping too.

I found a Greenhouse supply store that sells a tape on Zipper too desingined for Greenhouses for making a doorway. $12.95 6' tall.
No. 125     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Oct 16, 2016 at 2:07 AM     
One of the articles said the smaller Cherry and Grape Tomato varieties are better able to withstand cold or even a light frost.

We did in fact have a light Frost the other night/morning. I did see frost on the ground and a light frost on my Tomato plants.

So far all my Tomato plants still seem to be holding up and still growing. Warmed back up today and supposed to be 81 or so Monday.

Coldest it's supposed to get for at least a week is only 42 at night one night so I should be good for awhile.

The Pepper plants held up ok too so far and are still producing.

One in a pot and 1 Tomato Patio Tomato plant in a pot I will eventually bring inside once it gets too cold and they'll still produce for awhile.
No. 126     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Oct 16, 2016 at 2:10 AM     
Some White, Yellow, and Red Onions I had planted in a 5 gallon bucket last Spring sure took off again recently!

The green tops had all died off this Summer and I thought they were dead or rotten or something. I kinda forgot about them and the last week or so with cooler weather the green tops shot up like a rocket all over again so I have green onions for my salads for awhile! :ban_dance:
No. 127     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Oct 16, 2016 at 2:16 AM     
The Cucumber Vines I had let grow onto the roof have all died off with the recent cool weather. Cucumber vines do NOT like cold weather! But I still have tons of tennis or baseball sized round cukes to pick.

I cleared some of the dead vines away the other day so the Cherry Tomato plants can get more sun and continue to grow. I am starting to get lots of them and boy are they sweet! "Sweet 100" sure fits them as their name!

The article I read said you can take some cuttings of Cherry Tomato vines and stick them in water, they will then root.

You can then plant them in a pot indoors and let them sprawl out along a sunny window over the winter.

Come spring you can take more cuttings of those and pot them, then transplant them outside after the last frost and they will shoot up quick giving you and early and abundant cherry tomato harvest!
No. 128     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 16, 2017 at 3:25 PM     
I have a bunch of stuff planted this year. With more plants due to arrive any day now from 2 Nurseries.

Have at least half a dozen varieties of Tomatoes.

The Snow Peas are a few inches tall now.

2 types of Spinach growing.

4 varieties of Strawberries both in the ground and in pots, all have fruit too.

Planted Red & White Onions for the first time, all puffing up green shoots.

6 Chinese Cabbages, I read they are high in nutrients.

Transplanted some of the Red Raspberry brambles which were growing outside of the garden area in the lawn.

My Cherry bush I planted last year is growing fine, no cherries yet, maybe next year.

Going out now to plant some Giant Sunflower seeds and Romaine Lettuce I got yesterday.
No. 129     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  May 16, 2017 at 4:13 PM     
Sounds like a nice garden ... with variety too. We have not started anything in our garden yet ... usually have everything planted by Memorial Day.
No. 130     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 16, 2017 at 5:33 PM     
Went out to check the mailbox and found a box in there from one of the Nurseries containing my 2 Aronia Viking Berry plants and 2 Goji plants.

The Goji plant I planted last year did not make it and died last year, as did all the other plants I ordered from them except for the Cherry Bush which is growing like gangbusters.

I still have a 1 year replacement guarantee though on all the plants, have to send the shipping label in soon to get free replacements.

Part of the reasons some died were my fault, some were not.

I recently found a "ratings" site that rates just about all online Nurseries on how good or bad they are:

http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/

I found many horror stories related to the Nursery I ordered from last year. While their prices are low, so are their plants and service!

This time I ordered from a highly rated Nursery in Missouri for these plants. They are right now one of the top 30 rated online Nurseries in the Nation. They came as live plants in plugs in plastic bags with instructions on them then in a crush resistant box: http://www.rareseeds.com/about/

They were kinda hot being in the aluminum mailbox half a day but once I gave them a drink they perked right up! They are only 2-4" tall.

Hopefully these will take. The plants were $6 each.

Once established though they are relatively carefree and produce gobs of berries which are very high in nutrients.

The Goji plant incidentally is from the Himalayas.
No. 131     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 18, 2017 at 8:39 PM     
crayons wrote:

i captured/bookmarked the heirloom supertomato link... i've got
the perfect fence and a spring that popped up with plenty of drainage for next year, will be ordering!

and i understand about the pollination, i have buku's of wasps, hornets
and sugar bees (NOT honey bees) and they're all scavengers... but they
are getting clean water not chemical water, if they were getting chemical
water i'd have to kill em all. chemical water makes these creatures crazy.

They respect my presence and only go after other two legged intruders.


The 4, "Triple-L Crop" vining Tomato plants arrived today in a box in the mail. They were in small plastic cells in peat moss like you normally buy veggie plants in.

They look a bit sick but we shall see what they look like after I watered them today. I have them in the shade for now for a day or 2 to rejuvenate.

I am anxious to see how tall I can get these babies, lol. Will probably spread them out around the edge of my deck that way the kids won't get them.

I also ordered the seeds for this plant.
No. 132     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  May 18, 2017 at 9:10 PM     
unfortunately/fortunately however you want to look at it
we ran out of room and i packed the spring with about 3 tons
of rock rolling over and over it with a 10 ton roller than asphalted
over it...have since acquired more property/dirt next door that has natural spring water holes/water flowing out of it.
No. 133     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 19, 2017 at 11:27 PM     
crayons wrote:

unfortunately/fortunately however you want to look at it
we ran out of room and i packed the spring with about 3 tons
of rock rolling over and over it with a 10 ton roller than asphalted
over it...have since acquired more property/dirt next door that has natural spring water holes/water flowing out of it.


Paving over a Spring in the Texas desert why that's sacrilegious!

I would have developed it, channeled it for watering purposes!
No. 134     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  ChildOfGod559   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  May 22, 2017 at 2:25 AM     
CAsandie wrote:

So I finally found a drought resistant plant that requires little to no water but flowers...an evergreen...

California Lilac / carmel creeper

But I can't find where to get it in San Diego (I keep calling and everyone says they do not have it right now. I did find out that the red apple ground covering that died...also occurred to the grower and they think a virus? I am able to find it though at a few nurseries (just a shortage).

Whatever the case...I would like to know if mint can grow alongside the red apple as mint takes over a garden quickly and would fill in my bear spots (where the red apple died) and also keeps away mice I just learned!

BF -- would you know?

I Have six drought tolerant plants. All are; the "Crown of Thorns" (which are a Jesus plant) Vigorous, Shrubby perennial. Clusters of eye-catching flower bracts in several bright colors. Red, and Yellow are my favorite. White are attractive as well. You may look them up on the internet. They will keep animals, and people out of your garden. I have them on my patio. Not to keep anything out, but just because its my favorite plant! :-) They look best with regular watering in hotter months...I love mine.
No. 135     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 25, 2017 at 8:31 PM     
My poor Goji plants, also known as, "Lifeberry", Wolfberry", looked like they were sick. :sick:



So I read up some more about them which I should have done in the first place :rolleyes: and found out a few things I was doing wrong.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edible/fruits/goji-berry/growing-goji-berries-in-containers.htm

Goji plants need full sun, I planted them where it only got partial sun, maybe less than a half day.

At temperatures below 50 degrees they begin entering "dormancy" and they are a deciduous plant which means they will lose their leaves every year before winter.

They prefer alkaline soil, not acid. The Nursery recommended adding crushed Oyster shells so i'll have to pick some of that up, same stuff you use for Chickens.

They like well drained soil, it has been awfully wet out lately.

The Nursery recommended planting them directly into the ground, but I read they can be grown in pots very well so I dug them up, put a big fertilizer pill into pots which is a timed, slow release pill about the size of half a golf ball. It feeds for 1-3 years and won't hurt roots.

I placed the plants in 6" wide pots so they should do for awhile.

I also read if the weather is cold below 50 you should bring the pots inside at night and place them back outside during the day (so they don't lose there leaves and go into dormancy).

They are very hardy, and will grow in Zones anywhere from 3-9 although in the hot desert southwest over 100 degrees they recommend planting them in some partial shade to get some relief from the hot sun.

So now I have them in more sun, in pots with fertilizer pill, and weather is now in the 50's at night so I hopefully should start seeing them turn around. :pray:
No. 136     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 25, 2017 at 8:42 PM     
I also read Goji plants are easily propagated via stem cuttings using rooting hormone.

I already have some rooting hormone but have yet to try it with anything.

So if/when my Goji plants are big enough I will have try and propagate some! I could even sell them! They tend to command a good price both locally and online.

No. 137     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 25, 2017 at 9:16 PM     
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/aronia/growing-aronia-berries.htm



My 2 Aronia Berry plants I have in 6" pots.

One of them has taken off very well and is growing like gangbusters! :dance:

The other one is still smaller and an waiting to see when this one will start growing too. :unsure: It does look ok though and not sick so we will see.

I pull both of them out of the pots though and popped in one of those fertilizer pills. (Should have done that in the first place!).

I read up more on Aronia Berries today and see there are varieties for visual beauty, and others for fruit production.

The, Viking" variety I have is best for fruit production I read. :dance:

Aronia berries are also known as, "Chokeberries". The variety I have produces black berries, but other varieties produce red.

Aronia berries can be eaten fresh, make good Preserves, Jam, Juice, Jelly, Tea, Syrup, and even Wine I have read.

On their own they are a bit tart but cooked or the juice halved with apple juice it is great.

The picked berries will keep for MONTHS when stored in the refrigerator! Show's that for survival food! :icon_eek:

They are pretty much disease and insect free and can grow in and tolerate a wide variety of conditions.

They love full Sun but will tolerate partial shade and they are self-pollinating! Which means you only need 1 plant for fruit!

They are Native to the Great Lakes region here where I live and a plant will last about 30 years!

They can grow in Zones 3-8 and are good down to -30 below zero so almost anywhere.

They have great health benefits too!

Delicious Sour Berries Filled With Health Benefits

"The Viking Aronia Berry, also known as Chokeberry, is a unique, tart berry with black glossy skin that’s famous for its flavor-packed punch when used in recipes for muffins, jams, wines, desserts and more.

They have a distinct flavor that will make you pucker with nodes of sweeter berries like blueberries and cranberries when eaten fresh. Their sour taste is perfect for combining with sweeter foods, like ice cream and cakes, because they give recipes the mouthwatering zing that they’ve been missing.

A Fun Snack that tastes like sour candy, but is 100% healthy. Add a handful to salads or oatmeal and give your immune system a boost. These berries are filled with vitamins and minerals.

They are a great source of vitamin C, E, and A, and also have high levels of potassium, iron, and manganese. The antioxidants in Viking Aronia Berries help to protect the eyes and skin, and the fiber content promotes colon health..."

https://www.fast-growing-trees.com/Viking-Aronia-Berry-Bush.htm

Aronia Berries were used by Native Americans as a meat preservative. It was recently discovered to have anti-fungal and anti-bacterial properties.

Aronia berries have 3 times the antioxidants of Blueberries! :icon_eek:

http://uncommonfruit.cias.wisc.edu/aronia-black-chokeberry/
No. 138     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 26, 2017 at 8:25 PM     
Ok looked at my poor Goji plants today and it looks like they are starting to grow some small, tiny green leaves so I think putting them in the full sun has helped. I think they may may make it! :ban_dance::bowdown:

I will leave them in pots until they are a bigger size and more likely to survive being in the ground by themselves where threats from animals, kids, weeds, other plants make it harder for small plants to survive.
No. 139     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 26, 2017 at 8:40 PM     
The Mammoth Grey Striped Sunflower seeds have sprouted so I have to plant those into the ground as they will grow very fast in no time.

They make Flower heads up to 12"-20" in diameter and get more than 12' feet tall! :icon_eek::icon_eek:

I am growing these as a novelty to see how big they will get with my little over half day sun. I don't expect they will get that big though in my part day sun but will still be fun watching them grow. And if I get some seeds out of them at maturity before the Birds devour them great!

The seeds are great for feeding to birds or Chickens I have read.

I have seen these Flower heads packed full of seeds for sale at a local Farmer's Market and was astonished at how big the flower head was! :icon_eek:

No. 140     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 26, 2017 at 8:56 PM     
I found a GREAT Nursery or, "Vineyard" as this one calls themselves in NY that sells reasonably priced hi quality Grape Vines and Berry plants of all types.

They have a huge selection of Grape Vines for Northern, Southern and hot climates. And most grape Vines are only $9.00 each.

Their Raspberry Brambles are only $3.50 each!

https://doubleavineyards.com/

(They cannot ship Vines to California, Washington, Oregon, or Idaho, sorry!).

The 22 ratings by people at Dave's Garden about the above Vineyard are 100 positive also!

http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/c/3203/





No. 141     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  May 26, 2017 at 9:49 PM     
ChildOfGod559 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

So I finally found a drought resistant plant that requires little to no water but flowers...an evergreen...

California Lilac / carmel creeper

But I can't find where to get it in San Diego (I keep calling and everyone says they do not have it right now. I did find out that the red apple ground covering that died...also occurred to the grower and they think a virus? I am able to find it though at a few nurseries (just a shortage).

Whatever the case...I would like to know if mint can grow alongside the red apple as mint takes over a garden quickly and would fill in my bear spots (where the red apple died) and also keeps away mice I just learned!



I Have six drought tolerant plants. All are; the "Crown of Thorns" (which are a Jesus plant) Vigorous, Shrubby perennial. Clusters of eye-catching flower bracts in several bright colors. Red, and Yellow are my favorite. White are attractive as well. You may look them up on the internet. They will keep animals, and people out of your garden. I have them on my patio. Not to keep anything out, but just because its my favorite plant! :-) They look best with regular watering in hotter months...I love mine.


Thank you ChildofGod -- I googled...these are beautiful, protective and drought tolerant!

(Plus I love the name)!!!!

https://www.etsy.com/listing/511348308/crown-of-thorns-plant-with-bright-red?ref=related-5

I have what my neighbor that was a gardener called a tears of Jesus shrub that is very hardy. I have my Dad's that was in a pot and it's been outside my door (two separate residents) since his passing (14 years plus).

Thanks again!



BF -- Wow! What a wonderful and 'healthy' garden you are planting! (quite a variety).

Thanks for sharing as well.



No. 142     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  ChildOfGod559   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  May 26, 2017 at 11:39 PM     
Casandie, So glad you were able to check "The crown of thorns" out. Mine are so beautiful, and in the cold winter months I bring them in from my patio. They are bug free. They grow nice in the house as well. I just love all plants that have anything named after Jesus. I will check out the "tears of Jesus" you mentioned. But, I really have no more room for more plants...By the way, you can train the crown of thorns to grow as a crown! :smile: Enjoy your garden Casandie.
No. 143     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  ChildOfGod559   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  May 26, 2017 at 11:43 PM     
BF, Very nice all the great things you are sharing with us. Thanks! Gardening is fun, and to see the fruit of your labor!:smile: God bless!
No. 144     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 29, 2017 at 7:07 PM     
Just got home after being gone for 2 days working 3, 12 hour shifts back to back and practically living on the Train and noticed my 2 Goji plants leaves have grown a bit. So I think they are gonna make it!

These are the tiny new leaves that sprouted the other day.

I think the bigger leaves on it which look a sickly yellow may be dying due to the cold spells we had at night over the last few weeks.

Tomorrow being I have the day off we do some more gardening and will plant the 6 Trip-L crop Tomatoes before they croak.

Still waiting on an order from this same Nursery for a bunch of other stuff I ordered. So far these Tomato plants are all they have sent.
No. 145     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  May 29, 2017 at 10:00 PM     
ChildOfGod559 wrote:

Casandie, So glad you were able to check "The crown of thorns" out. Mine are so beautiful, and in the cold winter months I bring them in from my patio. They are bug free. They grow nice in the house as well. I just love all plants that have anything named after Jesus. I will check out the "tears of Jesus" you mentioned. But, I really have no more room for more plants...By the way, you can train the crown of thorns to grow as a crown! :smile: Enjoy your garden Casandie.


ChildofGod ... Thank you. There is a plant called the tears of Christ / wax plant that I found trying to research my own. I love this video!

(sharing in case you or BF might enjoy this). Truly Beautiful.

I think the Crown of Thorns plants would be lovely inside as well. I found one online, but want to check with my local homedepot and will be going this week. Thank you again.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_OPBsm6ucQ

No. 146     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  ChildOfGod559   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  May 30, 2017 at 3:02 AM     
Awe, Thanks so much CAsandie. I have ordered the "Tears of Christ" at a nursery in our neighboring town. So, I have that to look forward too. By the way, the crown of throrns plant does do very well inside next to the window where it gets sun and fresh air daily. Also, Home Depot can order your crown of thorns if they do not have them in. Ours here ordered a dozen for me, but I did not buy them all, and they did not expect I would. The man expressed he had several people looking for it. I now have six plants of the crown. I love it so much. So, thanks again for the video, and telling me about the Jesus plant. I will love that one too! :smile: And...you will love the crown of thorns!:smile: So, we live happily ever after...
Excuse me, a normal tying error. If I do not slow down I might burn this keyboard up!
No. 147     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  May 30, 2017 at 10:16 AM     

ChildofGod...Wow! You have already ordered one! Awesomeness. I pray it brings you great pleasure. . With the crown of thorns, I have a window box in my kitchen that might offer enough sunlight (my only worry is that it is a mirror like window in which to deflect sunlight...I'm not sure why the builders of this house created a nice sized window box for plants and used the same reflective windows (or window treatment) as they did on the rest of the house). :-p

Yes about Home Depot! Exactly what I was thinking! I'm finding that a lot of companies cannot ship into California anymore and Home Depot seems to be able.

It's raining here today ChildofGod! If it is raining there, stay dry but enjoy. Thank you (I loved the exchange of plants here with Jesus names in this thread).


BF -- When you were on break, I've discussed that I have been gardening a 1/2 acre by myself this year and I've likely done more gardening than in my entire life (of mostly pulling weeds after the CA rains. I was taking it as a challenge as I hire every year and wanted to be self-sufficient this year). I had to hire ppl for the big hill behind my house (and hopefully the youth will be calling from my Church soon as it seems as soon as I got an area clean of weeds ... it rains and more pop up)! :-p (I am getting amendments for the soil as well as a lot of pre-emergents tomorrow and adding this to areas cleared now...so hopefully next year I will have less weeding! I must say though -- I've really enjoyed it (more so than I thought I would...I sing hymns, had a gopher pop it's head up at me, birds fly close by, many hummingbirds/ a lot of time to talk to the Lord and some serious exercise too since the land around here is sloped and steep)!

Thank you for this thread (I am reading what you are planting and learning some things)!





No. 148     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 30, 2017 at 12:10 PM     
Yes about Home Depot! Exactly what I was thinking! I'm finding that a lot of companies cannot ship into California anymore and Home Depot seems to be able.


That would be because they are getting them from Nurseries located inside of California.

The State to State laws exist to try and help prevent the spread of certain plant diseases.

Or to help prevent the spread of some plants they consider an invasive species that can grow wild and multiply like crazy overpowering other normally native plants.
No. 149     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  May 30, 2017 at 1:00 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Yes about Home Depot! Exactly what I was thinking! I'm finding that a lot of companies cannot ship into California anymore and Home Depot seems to be able.


That would be because they are getting them from Nurseries located inside of California.

The State to State laws exist to try and help prevent the spread of certain plant diseases.

Or to help prevent the spread of some plants they consider an invasive species that can grow wild and multiply like crazy overpowering other normally native plants.


Yes. I think California's regulations got heightened with a fruit fly epidemic that wiped out a lot of orange groves.

No. 150     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 30, 2017 at 10:38 PM     
Over 800-900 varieties of Tomatoes! :blink:

http://www.reimerseeds.com/tomato_711.aspx
No. 151     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 30, 2017 at 11:05 PM     
I opened the door to go to Walmart today to get some more Garden supplies and see if they had any crushed Oyster Shells for my Goji plants (they didn't have any ), and laying on the deck was a big green plastic bag over 3' tall and 1.5' wide.

My Nursery plants arrived! :ban_dance:

SO I held off going to Walmart until later and began planting as much as I could being it is my day off.

I got everything planted except the 3 Dwarf Flowering Cherry plants which are 3' tall! I thought I saw 3 in the bag but only bought 2? Will see tomorrow.

They are bare root but starting to show bud growth already so I gave them a spray with the hose and closed the bag back up and placed it on my deck in the shade until tomorrow when I plant them. Have to do a lot of digging and those are going directly into the ground next to my Nanking Cherry bush already in the ground I planted last year.

Dwarf Flowering Cherry
Prunus besseyi

https://www.eburgess.com/6223-dwarf-flowering-cherry

2 for $3.49 ($1.75 each)

"Produces sweet, fleshy purple-black fruit. Commonly called Sand Cherry. 5' Flowering bush makes an excellent hedge. Drought tolerant. Perfect for canning, sauces and eating from the bush. Hardy and beautiful with delicious fruit. Sturdy, well-rooted 1˝-3' plants."




No. 152     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 30, 2017 at 11:06 PM     
Here is also what I ordered and then planted:

1 Rubel Blueberry, came in a plastic bag with peat around the roots, it was already sprouting a few 6" long green twigs so it is alive. I planted this one in a big 12" wide pot popping one of those pep fertilizers pills in first.

Rubel Blueberry
Vaccinium

$6.99

https://www.eburgess.com/3871-rubel-blueberry

Twice the antioxidants of most other blueberries!

Rubel is an old-fashioned, wild blueberry that is an exceptionally heavy producer. Packed with more nutritional value and intense, sweet flavor than most modern blueberries. One of the best varieties for tasty pies. Fruit develops mid to late season. Plant with a 2nd variety for better pollination. Grows 4-8' tall. Plant 4-6' apart.
No. 153     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 30, 2017 at 11:08 PM     
3 Everbearing Darrow Blackberry canes.

https://www.eburgess.com/6151-everbearing-darrow-blackberry

Rubus

"Here's a real taste delight! The Darrow Blackberry was developed at the New York Experimental Station to bring you the best in flavor and spectacular crops year after year. The berries themselves are exceptionally large and sugar sweet. One of the most winter hardy blackberries! Ripen early and continue over a large period.

Proved 100% fruitful. Sweet Darrow Blackberry bushes are very thrifty, vigorous growing bushes that are exceptionally hardy -- having withstood temperatures of 22 below zero. The bushes are upright with very strong canes, being able to hold up a heavy crop without breaking down. Quick Crop Plants, 2 - year transplanted. Special reduced quantity prices!"

These came as bare root and 2' tall so we will see if they grow. I planted them directly into the ground in the same patch where my red raspberries grow. They should be fine with only a half day of sun and partial shade there. Gave them each a pep start fertilizer pill also.
No. 154     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 30, 2017 at 11:29 PM     
Planted 1 of these, it was about 3' tall and bare root. Only $3.49.

Loganberry
Rubus

https://www.eburgess.com/6882-loganberry

"Unique home grown treat! This natural cross between a blackberry and red raspberry produces long, tasty, dark red berries that are great for fresh eating, juices, pies, syrups, jams, jellies, and wines. It trails like a blackberry, but harvests like a raspberry with the flavor a unique marriage of the two. Because the fruits ripen at different times on the bush, it is not widely produced commercially and therefore remains a unique home grown treat. Ripens early in mid-late summer. Grows 8-10'. Zones 6-10. Good firm fruit and higher fruit production than thornless varieties on this lightly thorny plant."
No. 155     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 30, 2017 at 11:38 PM     
Planted 6 of these in 6" wide pots for now until they are strong enough to transplant into the ground. Put a pep pill into each hole before planting them. They came as bare root crowns and were already sprouting some 5" long white sprouts but some of those sprouts don't look too good. We'll see what happens... Apparently these all white strawberries can be grown in some shade. We shall see!

They were 6 for $7.99.

White Carolina Pineberry
Fragaria x ananassa 'White Carolina'

https://www.eburgess.com/3161-white-carolina-pineberry

"Strawberries that taste like pineapples! White Carolina is a naturally hybridized selection from crossing two different strawberry species. The result is a plant that bears a smaller pale pink berry that has a unique pineapple flavor to it. The plants generally bear in the spring and then later in the summer like an everbearer. Grows 6-8" tall and 18" wide. Zones 4-8."
No. 156     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 30, 2017 at 11:47 PM     
Also bought a package of 10 Quinault Strawberry crowns at Walmart for only $2.50. That's pretty cheap! I'll plant some of them tomorrow.

The Nursery I ordered my other plants from also sells this variety, 25 crowns for $6.99.


Quinault Strawberry
Fragaria

https://www.eburgess.com/6607-quinault-strawberry

"Here is a great tasting, heavy bearing, everbearing strawberry developed by Washington State University. It is well on its way to being the greatest performer ever. Quinault Strawberries have been tested in 13 states and Canada and have an excellent performance record for size, taste and plant growth. It was found to be the most disease free everbearer we have ever tested. Quinault Strawberries appear to have all the properties to make it a very popular --- if not the most popular variety of everbearing strawberries."

Strawberries in general:

"Everbearing Strawberries produce an early summer crop and also a fall crop with some berries on and off all summer. Tip: Pinch off blooms for first two months on everbearing strawberries to promote larger harvest.
June bearing strawberries produce a single crop each year during a 2-3 week period. Tip: If you get blooms the first year while the plant is getting established pinch the blooms off to ensure a large fruit crop the next year."
No. 157     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 30, 2017 at 11:50 PM     
I also finally transplanted the 4 Trip-L Crop vining Tomato plants that came in cells into larger 6" pots burying them up to the first set of leaves. Burying most of the stem this way produces a much more abundant crop and larger Tomatoes because the stem will develop roots all along it where you buried it.

I only have them in pots for a short time until they get strong and healthy then into the ground they will go.
No. 158     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 30, 2017 at 11:55 PM     
Although I have pinched off some Strawberry blossoms I did leave some on to grow into strawberries and just ate 8 of them today, very sweet! A few were already rotted and no good for eating so I have to check them everyday. There are more growing and they are all medium sized not too big.

Pinching off the blossoms and forgoing berries the first year will yield larger berries next year and more of them. Pinching off the flower forces the plant to channel it's energy onto growing maximum root growth the first year.
No. 159     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 31, 2017 at 12:02 AM     
Had to buy some plastic fencing at Walmart tonight and some plastic poles to hold it up.

The kids had stepped on my Snowpeas and some of the onions . So I have to do something to keep them out.

I need to get my video camera system put up, still have to order a hard drive for it sigh...
No. 160     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 31, 2017 at 12:11 AM     
The Darrow Blackberry and Loganberry plants I ordered have thorns. I intentionally ordered varieties like these WITH thorns so once the plants are established, I can easily make cuttings using the rooting hormone I have and multiply them by layering also.

I intend on making some impenetrable hedgerows/fences to keep those kids out of my gardens!

The Loganberry however is lightly thorned but gets up to 10' tall!



No. 161     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 31, 2017 at 12:36 AM     
I was happy to see on the front of the package of Strawberry plants I purchased tonight it says "Your SNAP or EBT card can be used to purchase any live vegetable, fruit plant, edible Tree (fruits or nuts) or seed"!

That's a good thing!

People on food stamps SHOULD learn to grow part of their food themselves!
No. 162     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 31, 2017 at 12:48 AM     
Elderberries, Gooseberries, and the Aronia plants I have will grow in partial sun/shade.

So that's where the Aronia plants will be going as soon as they get big enough in the pots, in the shady spot behind my mobile home.

Still have to order some Elderberries and Gooseberries.
No. 163     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 31, 2017 at 1:33 AM     
Also bought 2 more potted Tomato varieties at Walmart tonight.

1 Grape Tomato plant.

And a yellow cherry tomato plant that actually has 2 plants in 1 pot. But I got it at the single plant price!

Will have to cut the rootball in order to separate the 2 plants but that's ok.

Yellow Tomatoes incidentally for those of you who may not know are low in acid so if you have a touchy stomach try yellow tomatoes!
No. 164     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  May 31, 2017 at 1:41 AM     
Ran out of those pep start pills so will have to order some more:

https://www.eburgess.com/8311-pep-start-pills

They have certainly proven themselves on the Sugar Sweet Cherry bush I planted last year which is almost 3' high now and filling out nicely!

I probably won't see any cherries on it until next year though. It normally takes 2-3 years to bear fruit.

No. 165     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  May 31, 2017 at 8:55 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Over 800-900 varieties of Tomatoes! :blink:

http://www.reimerseeds.com/tomato_711.aspx


Wow ... I held no idea there were so many types of tomatoes. I was looking at some of the different types from the link you provided. I noted that some say organic and some say "indeterminate" and "determinate." I looked up what the later meant (I was not familiar with the term)...

cut and pasted from online: Indeterminate varieties of tomatoes are also called "vining" tomatoes. They will grow and produce fruit until killed by frost and can reach heights of up to 10 feet although 6 feet is considered the norm. They will bloom, set new fruit and ripen fruit all at the same time throughout the growing season.


There is so much to learn as far as gardening. Berries are so good for us. You are going to be able to make some serious healthy smoothies this summer with all the growing you are doing. :2thumbs:

White Mulberries make a pleasant and healthy tea (I put honey in mine).


No. 166     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  ChildOfGod559   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 12:20 AM     
CAsandie wrote:


ChildofGod...Wow! You have already ordered one! Awesomeness. I pray it brings you great pleasure. . With the crown of thorns, I have a window box in my kitchen that might offer enough sunlight (my only worry is that it is a mirror like window in which to deflect sunlight...I'm not sure why the builders of this house created a nice sized window box for plants and used the same reflective windows (or window treatment) as they did on the rest of the house). :-p

Yes about Home Depot! Exactly what I was thinking! I'm finding that a lot of companies cannot ship into California anymore and Home Depot seems to be able.

It's raining here today ChildofGod! If it is raining there, stay dry but enjoy. Thank you (I loved the exchange of plants here with Jesus names in this thread).


BF -- When you were on break, I've discussed that I have been gardening a 1/2 acre by myself this year and I've likely done more gardening than in my entire life (of mostly pulling weeds after the CA rains. I was taking it as a challenge as I hire every year and wanted to be self-sufficient this year). I had to hire ppl for the big hill behind my house (and hopefully the youth will be calling from my Church soon as it seems as soon as I got an area clean of weeds ... it rains and more pop up)! :-p (I am getting amendments for the soil as well as a lot of pre-emergents tomorrow and adding this to areas cleared now...so hopefully next year I will have less weeding! I must say though -- I've really enjoyed it (more so than I thought I would...I sing hymns, had a gopher pop it's head up at me, birds fly close by, many hummingbirds/ a lot of time to talk to the Lord and some serious exercise too since the land around here is sloped and steep)!

Thank you for this thread (I am reading what you are planting and learning some things)!





CAsandie, The Crown Of Thorns will do fine in the window I am sure! However, it can grow out of a window such as you describe, so be prepared once it starts to florish, and take off! My sister who passed last year, her man works at Home Depot, and is Manager. Its a skip and jump for me, as its kiddy-corner to where I live. I just go over there, and he will always take care of me. He ordered a dozen of them. Most likely I won't have to even pay for it, he will. My dear sisters good nature of "giving" rubbed off on him years ago! Since I am the sister of the Love of his life, he is also good to me! I am still grieving her passing as it was sudden. She was the baby of us...anyway, he will call me when its in. This plant I will love too. Thanks so much for sharing with me...Ohhh yea it did rain lightly here, also this morning for about twenty mins. This is some different weather!:smile:
No. 167     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  ChildOfGod559   Gender: F   Age: 64   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 12:50 AM     
Wow BF, I just checked out how many hits this thread has got! Amazing! You are doing a great job by the sounds of all you have shared. Gardening is much joy, and a whole lot of work. I once maintained a garden, but now I have all potted plants only. Its much easier for me. And also very beautiful. I am not lazy by any means, but I am busy. Enjoy, and I will continue to enjoy reading your post here, as I see you like to share...its very exciting BF. God Bless.
No. 168     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 10:05 AM     
ChildofGod worte: CAsandie, The Crown Of Thorns will do fine in the window I am sure! However, it can grow out of a window such as you describe, so be prepared once it starts to florish, and take off


I stand forewarned. TY!!

My sister who passed last year, her man works at Home Depot, and is Manager. Its a skip and jump for me, as its kiddy-corner to where I live. I just go over there, and he will always take care of me. He ordered a dozen of them. Most likely I won't have to even pay for it, he will. My dear sisters good nature of "giving" rubbed off on him years ago! Since I am the sister of the Love of his life, he is also good to me! I am still grieving her passing as it was sudden. She was the baby of us...anyway, he will call me when its in.


Awesome about your Home Depot friend and I still pray for the sudden loss of your baby Sis. I too am still mourning the losses of last year, so I fully understand. Live moves on, but it is different without those we love the most in it.

This plant I will love too. Thanks so much for sharing with me...Ohhh yea it did rain lightly here, also this morning for about twenty mins. This is some different weather!


I am certain you will love it too and yeah for the rain. It is lightly sprinkling as I type this. :2thumbs: (hope it picks up a bit)!

On Gardening: There is so much to learn!! I picked up some amendments yesterday and the gentleman at home depot stated we ought not to be using potting soil for in ground planting (we've been doing that for years/he says after a bit it will turn to clay and strangle the roots)!!! <--we had no idea/it has worked for us actually (the plants have lived), but switching now and researching this!
No. 169     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 10:37 AM     
Went to plant the 2 dwarf flowering sand cherries this morning and noticed a tag on them that said, "Crop failure, substituted 2 Nanking Cherries".

Well that's fine, I think the Nankings cost more. Plus they match my Nanking already in the ground I planted last year.

One of these New ones is budding already even though bare root.
No. 170     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 10:41 AM     
Planted half of those Quinault Strawberry crowns in the ground and half in 5" pots. They will do for now and get them growing until I can plant them in bigger pots.

Ate a few more fresh strawberries this morning.
No. 171     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 10:46 AM     
Checked the White Carolina Pine Berries this morning, stems are starting to turn red and leaves are forming and turning green on 4 of them anyway so it looks like those will make it and I will eventually have WHITE Strawberries. The other 2 still look sickly.
No. 172     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 10:50 AM     
Transplanted 2 of the Giant Grey Striped Sunflowers to a secluded place at the bottom of my Stairs. Don't know if there is enough soil there but we shall see. Still have 3 more in a pot I have to find a place for.
No. 173     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 10:53 AM     
The Chinese Cabbage is now big enough to start harvesting leaves. Think I'll pick some for work tonight.
No. 174     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 8:26 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I also finally transplanted the 4 Trip-L Crop vining Tomato plants that came in cells into larger 6" pots burying them up to the first set of leaves. Burying most of the stem this way produces a much more abundant crop and larger Tomatoes because the stem will develop roots all along it where you buried it.

I only have them in pots for a short time until they get strong and healthy then into the ground they will go.


I can see a dramatic improvement to the health of these in just the short time I transplanted them into pots the other day.

Now I just have to find a safe spot to plant them into the ground.

I am thinking a few should go near the base of my deck so I can let the vines sprawl all around the edge of the deck. I have wooden lattice on the upper part of the deck they can grow on.

Remember the vines on this Tomato variety can get up to 2' long and produce bushels of Tomatoes! I doubt mine will get that big or productive though since they only will have a half day of sun there.
No. 175     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 8:42 PM     
ChildOfGod559 wrote:

Wow BF, I just checked out how many hits this thread has got! Amazing! You are doing a great job by the sounds of all you have shared. Gardening is much joy, and a whole lot of work. I once maintained a garden, but now I have all potted plants only. Its much easier for me. And also very beautiful. I am not lazy by any means, but I am busy. Enjoy, and I will continue to enjoy reading your post here, as I see you like to share...its very exciting BF. God Bless.


Well I don't know if i'm doing such a great job but if some of it grows I will be happy even if some of it fails.

It's a miracle I can grow anything here, kids trampling what I plant, animals eating things, Possums on my Deck, Cats on the roof, only a half day sun due to the mobile home next door and the tall 2 story factory building next to me. Then there's the huge Maple tree shading half of my lot out.

The old Maple tree is the biggest hindrance and I need to get a chainsaw and do some much needed surgery on it!

Gardening does not need to be a lot of work, there are tricks to make it much easier. Work smarter not harder as the saying goes!

Growing things on pots on a home made sturdy table waist high makes life easier. That's where I have the majority of my potted plants and where I pot them up. I still have some more lumber to get to finish that bench.

Placing down landscaping fabric with landscaping staples around things like my Cherry bush makes life much easier....NO weeding! The fabric keeps the weeds down and prevents them from growing.

Using micro irrigation with drip emitters on your pots for example, no hand watering! Simply set a timer once and you're all set!

I have to try that with some other things too.

As far as gardening being exciting I have always been fascinated planting things from seed and watching the miracle of it sprouting and growing. Even in grade school when we experimented with planting things then setting them in the window watching it grow I always though it fascinating!
No. 176     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 9:19 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

...On Gardening: There is so much to learn!! I picked up some amendments yesterday and the gentleman at home depot stated we ought not to be using potting soil for in ground planting (we've been doing that for years/he says after a bit it will turn to clay and strangle the roots)!!! <--we had no idea/it has worked for us actually (the plants have lived), but switching now and researching this!


You have to, "cut" potting soil with other amendments before planting plants in it whether in the ground or ESPECIALLY when in pots!

It is NOT meant to be used 100% straight out of the bag!

Most online sources recommend using only 20-25% potting soil, with the rest a combination of Peat Moss, ground bark, sand, manure, coir, or other amendments. The proportions vary depending on what exactly it is you are planting.

He is right, straight potting soil is WAY too dense for roots to properly breathe and this fact is even more important in pots.

A trick I have been doing in order to get more air into to root zone is to take a stick and poke multiple holes all around the edge of the soil in a potted plant so the roots can get more air.

I do this when raining out a lot especially as the soil gets pretty soggy and can kill the plants.

Think of it as the same way a Worm makes tunnels all throughout the soil helping aerate it.

A metal Barbecue skewer would work real well too.

Also drilling more holes into the bottom of pots and placing a screen into the bottom first, then gravel, can help with drainage and add lots of air to the root zone.
No. 177     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 9:37 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Over 800-900 varieties of Tomatoes! :blink:

http://www.reimerseeds.com/tomato_711.aspx


Wow ... I held no idea there were so many types of tomatoes. I was looking at some of the different types from the link you provided. I noted that some say organic and some say "indeterminate" and "determinate." I looked up what the later meant (I was not familiar with the term)...

cut and pasted from online: Indeterminate varieties of tomatoes are also called "vining" tomatoes. They will grow and produce fruit until killed by frost and can reach heights of up to 10 feet although 6 feet is considered the norm. They will bloom, set new fruit and ripen fruit all at the same time throughout the growing season.


There is so much to learn as far as gardening. Berries are so good for us. You are going to be able to make some serious healthy smoothies this summer with all the growing you are doing. :2thumbs:

White Mulberries make a pleasant and healthy tea (I put honey in mine).




I like berries!

Plus you only have to plant them ONCE and they will come back year after year!

I have thought about planting a Mulberry tree, although I would need to plant a dwarf variety for my limited space, they do sell them.

That way the kids can pick all they want to to their heart's content.

I read black Currants should grow well in partial shade. I doubt the kids would want those after getting a taste of one! :tongue:

No. 178     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 1, 2017 at 9:43 PM     
Here is a bizarre looking Tomato.

"The Traveler Tomato"

"Reisetomate Tomato

The most novel tomato we have seen, this tomato is like a big bunch of cherry tomatoes all fused together: an amazing trait that had everyone here asking questions about the alien-looking, bumpy tomatoes. Also called "Traveler tomato" ("reise" is German for "travel" or "journey") for the ability to tear it apart a piece at a time, with no need for a knife. This type of tomato traces its roots to Central America where the native people would carry traveler tomatoes on trips, to eat as they walked. Bright red tomatoes taste--well, rather sour, strong and acid. The perfect tomato for those who love raw lemons, but who cares? They are still far-out and groovy."

http://www.rareseeds.com/reisetomate-tomato/



No. 179     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 2, 2017 at 10:46 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Over 800-900 varieties of Tomatoes! :blink:

http://www.reimerseeds.com/tomato_711.aspx


Wow ... I held no idea there were so many types of tomatoes. I was looking at some of the different types from the link you provided. I noted that some say organic and some say "indeterminate" and "determinate." I looked up what the later meant (I was not familiar with the term)...

cut and pasted from online: Indeterminate varieties of tomatoes are also called "vining" tomatoes. They will grow and produce fruit until killed by frost and can reach heights of up to 10 feet although 6 feet is considered the norm. They will bloom, set new fruit and ripen fruit all at the same time throughout the growing season.


There is so much to learn as far as gardening. Berries are so good for us. You are going to be able to make some serious healthy smoothies this summer with all the growing you are doing. :2thumbs:

White Mulberries make a pleasant and healthy tea (I put honey in mine).




I like berries!

Plus you only have to plant them ONCE and they will come back year after year!

I have thought about planting a Mulberry tree, although I would need to plant a dwarf variety for my limited space, they do sell them.

That way the kids can pick all they want to to their heart's content.

I read black Currants should grow well in partial shade. I doubt the kids would want those after getting a taste of one! :tongue:



The traveler tomato you posted above is an odd looking one!

Berries are my favorite fruit! -- they are real pricey here!! (you are sure beating the price by growing them)! If I can get ahead of the weeds here and put down the pre-emergent, I want to plant berries.

When I first moved into this new place, I hired a man who put down an orange pre-emergent over the entire hill and then granules everywhere there were plants (pre-emergents). We didn't have a weed problem for years after. The man was let go of his job and I had a company no-show since (or I'd have already hired them again, because the rains brought all kind of weeds this year. I get ahead of them and new ones come).

The land is too large for the black net (albeit I am sectioning off an area and have red rubber mulch for that area and will put the black mesh down there).

I can't find what he used at the Home Depot. He said they use it on freeways (it comes in different colors and I wish I had written down the name of it). It might be for contractors only. I only found Preen Pre-emergent at home depot.

Anyway, I hope your berries do terrific this year (love them in cereal, smoothies or just as they are snacking)! You have a real healthy variety. .

No. 180     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 2, 2017 at 11:02 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

...On Gardening: There is so much to learn!! I picked up some amendments yesterday and the gentleman at home depot stated we ought not to be using potting soil for in ground planting (we've been doing that for years/he says after a bit it will turn to clay and strangle the roots)!!! <--we had no idea/it has worked for us actually (the plants have lived), but switching now and researching this!


You have to, "cut" potting soil with other amendments before planting plants in it whether in the ground or ESPECIALLY when in pots!

It is NOT meant to be used 100% straight out of the bag!

Most online sources recommend using only 20-25% potting soil, with the rest a combination of Peat Moss, ground bark, sand, manure, coir, or other amendments. The proportions vary depending on what exactly it is you are planting.

He is right, straight potting soil is WAY too dense for roots to properly breathe and this fact is even more important in pots.

A trick I have been doing in order to get more air into to root zone is to take a stick and poke multiple holes all around the edge of the soil in a potted plant so the roots can get more air.

I do this when raining out a lot especially as the soil gets pretty soggy and can kill the plants.

Think of it as the same way a Worm makes tunnels all throughout the soil helping aerate it.

A metal Barbecue skewer would work real well too.

Also drilling more holes into the bottom of pots and placing a screen into the bottom first, then gravel, can help with drainage and add lots of air to the root zone.


Thanks for this advice, BF!!!

I am 100% in ground planting, but it's good to know you have to mix the potting soil if planting in pots as well! A friend from Trinidad who is a really good gardener didn't want me to buy the amendments (she is afraid of termites). There seems to be a lot of bark in it (I bought an organic mixture ... I wanted to amend the dirt that is there anyway/so a huge bag). I'm hoping this does not attract termites...

There is so much to gardening that I am learning. Again appreciate you sharing your knowledge here. The home depot man talked me out of the steer manure I was going to purchase, he told me it really stinks and also told me you need to be quit experienced (only a very small amount or it will burn your plants)...so after planting I will be googling non-stinky, animal safe fertilizers (that I can't goof up on)!

(hard work and a lot of knowledge goes into this gardening stuff)!! :tongue:


No. 181     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 2, 2017 at 4:25 PM     
If cow manure stinks or burns up your plants that means it is still green and has not been properly composted.

Don't use it. Use only name brand fully composted cow manure like black kow for example.
No. 182     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 2, 2017 at 4:32 PM     
When I mentioned placing black landscaping fabric down I did not mean it goes over your entire lawn lol!

I meant you simply lay down a 2x2 or 3x3 foot section of it after cutting a slit for a hole in the middle to place it around whatever plant you want to protect from weeds.

Then hold it to the ground using landscaping staples.

It blocks sunlight to the weeds preventing them from growing yet lets water wand air pass through.
No. 183     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 2, 2017 at 5:00 PM     
Thanks BF. I'm not sure of the brand at Home Depot (it was only $1.36 and heavy, but the man working there talked me out of purchasing it).

The gardening fabric...I know, but I WISH I could put it all over! :tongue: (this is the first year we've ever had weeds like this likely due to the rain after the drought. Hopefully with all the pre-emergents and steps taken this year...next year will not be as bad)!

No. 184     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 2, 2017 at 8:20 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Thanks BF. I'm not sure of the brand at Home Depot (it was only $1.36 and heavy, but the man working there talked me out of purchasing it).

The gardening fabric...I know, but I WISH I could put it all over! :tongue: (this is the first year we've ever had weeds like this likely due to the rain after the drought. Hopefully with all the pre-emergents and steps taken this year...next year will not be as bad)!



Not sure if he knows the difference between, "Green Manure" and "Composted Manure". He may be thinking of what "green manure" is like and what it will do.

He may have even put down the stuff working as a landscaper on some former job and thinks THAT is what all manure is!

Most of the manure I see sold at the hardware stores in 20-40lb bags is NOT the, "green manure" that he is talking about!

Composted manure has no nasty smell because it is, "done".

Look on the bag...if it says, "composted manure" you should be safe and good to go...

There IS a difference!

Composted manure is an essential part of both in ground and potted plant gardening.

"Green manure" is the type they sometimes put down on lawns in the Fall. And yes it does stink and can burn various plants because it still has urine in it.

I remember schools would often use this stuff and you could smell it a block away lol.

Fully composted manure has no such smell and doesn't burn plants or roots because it has been aged enough where the microbes and oxygen have had a chance to do their work fully and completely.
No. 185     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 2, 2017 at 8:27 PM     
And to further complicate matters...the term, "Green Manure" is also used to define a plant based cover crop that you plow under as a form of "plant manure" which is not derived from farm animals.

So when I say, "Green manure" in the prior posts I am meaning, "Fresh manure" which has not gone through the composting process or long enough to render it non-smelly, etc.
No. 186     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 2, 2017 at 8:32 PM     
2 of those White Carolina Pineberries which looked sick have died. Or at least the white stems that had sprouted.

Will have to wait and see if they shoot out some more new sprouts before calling it quits with those 2.

They do have a replacement guarantee though.

The other 4 are sprouting some leaves now, stems are turning red.

The 3 Blackberry brambles aren't doing anything yet. I did scratch off some bark on one and found live tissue underneath it though.
No. 187     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 2, 2017 at 9:47 PM     
On the fertilizer: the bag I had said composed steer manure. The gentleman helping me might be mistaken then. Thanks.

On your plants that don't seem to be fairing well...I hope they might make it. I planted three coastal sunflowers last spring and all three looked dead, however, a year later now and they are alive and blooming (I almost removed them and I am glad I did not now). Hope yours come back too.


mod. typo
No. 188     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 6, 2017 at 3:07 AM     
CAsandie wrote:

On the fertilizer: the bag I had said composed steer manure. The gentleman helping me might be mistaken then. Thanks.

On your plants that don't seem to be fairing well...I hope they might make it. I planted three coastal sunflowers last spring and all three looked dead, however, a year later now and they are alive and blooming (I almost removed them and I am glad I did not now). Hope yours come back too.


mod. typo


Yes even if a plant looks dead it is best to wait a few months to see if it revives.

And some plants such as in your case as long as the root system or crown is still live they may come back a year later.

We had a real hotspell the other day for 2 day in a row at 92 degrees.

This is not normal for this time of year and sent a few of my plants into shock mode nearly killing them. Normal temps for this time are 60-70's and slowly creeping into the 80's.

The 2 Goji plants now look dead as far as most of the leaves.

The 6 White Carolina Strawberry plants look almost dead too. The new leaves that were growing seemed to have succumbed to the sudden heat.

I should have brought them all inside during that sudden hot spell.

All the other strawberry plants even those in pots seemed to have survived it quite well but they have well developed root systems already.

The others I mentioned above do not yet and are still just babies, lol.

The 2 Aronia plants seemed to have survived the sudden heatshock though. One of them still hasn't done any growing, it's still as small as ever and has green leaves but no growth. Maybe it is a dwarf.

The other one is almost 6" tall already.

Tomorrow we Garden and try and nurse them all back to health, lol.
No. 189     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 6, 2017 at 11:19 AM     
Just got done doing hours of Gardening. I started at 5:30am

I like doing it early if possible to beat the heat.

I got quite a bit done such as:

1. Installed a 3' high plastic fence all around my raised bed garden in back where the kids had trampled some Snowpeas and Onions. I cut up some 1/2" electrical conduit and pounded them into the ground using 42" sections for the fence poles. Then used some landscaping staples to tie the fence to the poles.

2. Trimmed a tree which was blocking the Sun to one of the new Nanking Cherry bushes I planted. Eventually i'll be cutting the whole tree down. Have a big pile of branches stacked up waiting to degenerate so I can burn them in the barrel.

3. Stuffed a bunch of dead branches into the burning barrel. Might burn them tomorrow am.

4. Hand watered all my plants in the back, the Raspberries, the 3 new Blackberries (still no signs of life from them, they were bare root), 2 Tomato plants, Onions, Snowpeas, the Loganberry (No sign of life from this yet either, was also bare root), 3 Cinese Cabbages, the Rhubarb and Chives are pretty much self sufficient and I rarely have to water them, they pretty much take care of themselves!

5. Poisoned the poison ivy plants which seem to have no trouble growing around here! Found maybe 8 of them.

6. Hand watered one of the new Nanking Cherry bushes and put landscape fabric around it holding it down with staples. I have a strong and sturdy Tomato cage around it to protect it from the kids killing it, hopefully. It seems to be getting Sun now since I trimmed the tree.

7. Turned on my automatic mini sprinkler for a for hours to water the raised bed garden in the front. I have all kinds of stuff in that patch, Asparagus, Strawberries, Tomatoes of differing types, Snowpeas, some Squash plants are now growing, about 6" tall. I will be training them up a pole to the roof as soon as they get big enough.

8. Planted the 2 Grape Tomato plants and 2 Yellow Cherry Tomato plants in the above raise bed garden.

9. Pulled weeds and grass from the gardens. Trimmed weeds around the property too.

10. Repotted the 2 Goji plants which looked like they were dying. The soil was a bit too thick I think so I cut it with more Peat Moss. Although that makes the soil acidic, I also mixed in a scoop of fine gravel dust from across the road which should help lower the ph to Goji's Alkaline preference. If they live it will be a miracle. The heat the other day stressed them too I think.

11. A few of the stuff I had started from seed a few weeks back didn't make it due to heavy rains drowning them. So this time I reseeded a bunch of different stuff in new trays using humidity domes propped up a bit for air circulation. This should keep the rain out, but humidity levels high. I can bring them inside if it gets too hot until they sprout.

12. Hand watered stuff in pots with the hose/mister/sprayer.

No. 190     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 6, 2017 at 11:25 AM     
Going to order some more White Pineberries since I know they will grow in total shade. Am ordering from a different Nursery though and they come in lots of 25 crowns to a bag for not much more than I paid for the other 6.

Am also ordering some Gooseberries and black Currants since they too will grow in shade. I still have lots of room in the shady spot for stuff like this.

Maybe a Grape vine or 2.

I read just about any root crop and "greens" such as lettuce will also grow in partial shade. So that where the lettuce will go.
No. 191     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 6, 2017 at 11:27 AM     
Many of the online Nurseries are sold out of stuff I wanted.

There are exceptions but I won't post them here until I order some stuff in a day or 2

No. 192     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 6, 2017 at 11:36 AM     
I finally planted "The 10 Commandments" seed today! Well I only planted 9 seeds, don't have room for much else. As far as I know these are not edible since they are a Gourd. But I could preserve them with furniture polish and use them for potting plants in.

This variety is also called the, "Crown of thorns Gourd".

http://www.reimerseeds.com/ten-commandments-gourds.aspx
No. 193     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 6, 2017 at 11:52 AM     
http://www.rareseeds.com/galilee-spinach-/

Planted, "Galilee Spinach" today. It is from Israel near the Sea Of Galilee. It is a true Spinach, is heat tolerant, resists bolting, and high in nutrients.

The seeds are very strange looking, almost like "burrs". They are large, and have 2-3 "prongs" on them which looking like they could catch on animals to be transported elsewhere.
No. 194     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 6, 2017 at 11:55 AM     
The giant Sunflowers seem to be growing well, both the 2 in the ground and the 3 in a pot. Will have to get them into the ground somewhere soon!
No. 195     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 7, 2017 at 1:39 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

On the fertilizer: the bag I had said composed steer manure. The gentleman helping me might be mistaken then. Thanks.

On your plants that don't seem to be fairing well...I hope they might make it. I planted three coastal sunflowers last spring and all three looked dead, however, a year later now and they are alive and blooming (I almost removed them and I am glad I did not now). Hope yours come back too.


mod. typo


Yes even if a plant looks dead it is best to wait a few months to see if it revives.

And some plants such as in your case as long as the root system or crown is still live they may come back a year later.

We had a real hotspell the other day for 2 day in a row at 92 degrees.

This is not normal for this time of year and sent a few of my plants into shock mode nearly killing them. Normal temps for this time are 60-70's and slowly creeping into the 80's.

The 2 Goji plants now look dead as far as most of the leaves.

The 6 White Carolina Strawberry plants look almost dead too. The new leaves that were growing seemed to have succumbed to the sudden heat.

I should have brought them all inside during that sudden hot spell.

All the other strawberry plants even those in pots seemed to have survived it quite well but they have well developed root systems already.

The others I mentioned above do not yet and are still just babies, lol.

The 2 Aronia plants seemed to have survived the sudden heatshock though. One of them still hasn't done any growing, it's still as small as ever and has green leaves but no growth. Maybe it is a dwarf.

The other one is almost 6" tall already.

Tomorrow we Garden and try and nurse them all back to health, lol.


I still hope they come back. I still regret pulling a tree I had that looked dead (my sand plum tree as I read an article where they can appear dead and come back. I am still mourning that tree/loved it so).

Goji or wolfberries are stated to be quite hardy in this article I read (hoping they come back for you)!

https://www.fast-growing-trees.com/Goji-Berry-Plant.htm
No. 196     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 7, 2017 at 4:02 PM     
We're getting another hotspell coming up this Sunday. Supposed to be 93 out!

I think i'll move a few pots into the shade or indoors Saturday for a few days. Place them out early Monday for a few hours then back inside.
No. 197     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 7, 2017 at 4:07 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

I still hope they come back. I still regret pulling a tree I had that looked dead (my sand plum tree as I read an article where they can appear dead and come back. I am still mourning that tree/loved it so).

Goji or wolfberries are stated to be quite hardy in this article I read (hoping they come back for you)!

https://www.fast-growing-trees.com/Goji-Berry-Plant.htm


Yes i've read that article before, and a few others at that site.

They are only hardy "once established".



Being they are or were only Nursery plugs they are still considered babies and therefore subject to the elements until they get a bigger root system established.

They don't have that yet. If and when the roots get more developed it will have a fighting chance.

Right now, they both look almost dead.
No. 198     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 63   on  Jun 7, 2017 at 5:38 PM     
Readers of this thread may be interested in the 3rd Annual Home Grown Food Summit, kicking off in 4 days, Monday, June 12 and goes for 7 days.

38+ speakers and you can listen to their talks for FREE!

Check it out -

http://thegrownetwork.pages.ontraport.net/hgfs-trailer


No. 199     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 14, 2017 at 12:14 PM     
Well unfortunately we've had a 5 day unseasonably warm heat wave of 93-94 which seems to be killing off some of the new plants I had ordered.

All the White Pineberry plants seem dead, although the crowns might still be alive.

The 3 Blackberry and Loganberry brambles have not show any signs of life.

The Blueberry bush seems to had died in the heat yesterday. But as long as the root haven't dried out it may come back.

1 of the Goji plants seems to have died. The other still has live leaves. I have them in the shade until they get stronger and establish more roots.

Ate the first of my Raspberries this morning. Many of the Brambles appeared to be drying out so I got my irrigation drip hose going in that bed and can slow water it all day.

That should plump up the berries pretty good.

Also go a hose hooked up so I can water the shaded bed where the Onions, Snowpeas, 3 Chinese cabbages, and Rhubarb plats are.

Need to order a mini drip irrigation kit for that area too.

The Nanking Cherry bushes are growing like gangbusters! You can't kill em! VERY hardy plants and they are establishing themselves very well.

All Tomato plants are starting to grow good and the Sweet100 is forming Tomatoes.

Ate some more Strawberries from the garden and pots.

The Zucchini, Mexican Red Beans, and one of the Ten Commandments Gourds sprouted with more on the way. Some Winter Squash is sprouting too, a few more days and I can plant some in the ground.

Some gourmet lettuce I have growing in a pot is about ready to start snipping.



No. 200     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 14, 2017 at 12:19 PM     
The poison ivy plants seem to be doing quite well too. :sick:

As fast as I locate them and spray them with a special poison ivy killer I find more have popped up in a day or 2 that weren't there days before.

I ran out of the killer juice and have to get some more asap. It does work and kills each plant in a couple days. It kills it at the root according to the label. You spray it on the leaves, which then absorb the juice down to the root where it kills it there and not nearby plants, supposedly.
No. 201     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 14, 2017 at 12:25 PM     
Supposed to be 90 the next 4 days but with some T-Storms every day too, which should help. Then finally cooling off to 81 on Sunday, with storms.

Transplanted the 3 remaining giant sunflowers into the ground, those babies grow fast!

Transplanted some Mexican Red Beans, and Zucchini into pots for now until I can find a spot in the ground for them.
No. 202     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 14, 2017 at 7:41 PM     
Since some T-Storms were moving in, I decided to move the Goji plants out from the shade and into the open so they could get some more light and rain too.

There has been a salt accumulation growing on top of the soil in all the pots from me watering everything out of the hose.

Goji plants do not like salt I read.

So today's T-Storms which became heavy should wash that salt away somewhat.

There was lots of at intersections as I rode on the bus to work.

Supposed to have T-Storms every day for the next 4 days until Sunday.

I know the Raspberry plants in the ground sure needed the rain and they should plump up quite nicely during the next week or more because of all this rain.

Some stuff in pots on the other hand may drown!
No. 203     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 20, 2017 at 10:46 AM     
1 of the Goji plants seems to have died during that multi-day heat spell.

It's roots weren't developed enough.

The other one seems to be growing more leaves and looks like it will pull through.

1 of the Aronia Berry plants is healthy, growing good, and I will transplant it into the ground soon. Probably in the partial shade out back where I recently fenced off. This plant can tolerate partial shade.

The other Aronia plant is still small, and I accidentally knocked the container off the shelf last week and it broke the top of the plant off. :rolleyes:

But it seems to be holding up and is growing some new small leaves so should make it.

Transplanted some Carnival multicolored Bell Peppers I had started from seed into pots this morning.

Some Sweet Banana Peppers I started from seed too into pots too.

As well as some, "10 Commandments Gourds", Mexican Red Bean plants, Winter Squash, Zucchini, and a few more I had all started from seed.

The Snow Pea plants on the ground seem to be doing good, made some purple flowers recently, no pods yet, a little late in the season but they may produce some.

Sweet 100 Cherry Tomato plants are producing Tomatoes, none ripe yet though.

All 3 Nanking Cherry Bushes have taken off like a rocket! Maybe some Cherries next year, or possibly some on the one I planted a year ago.

All kinds of Tomato plants growing healthy.

The 6 "Trip-L Crop" long vining Tomato plants I had ordered free from a Nursurey are all healthy and growing. Transplanted 2 of them into the ground. Will probably transplant more tomorrow. Supposedly these can make vines up to 25 feet long and produce bushels of Tomatoes! I doubt mine will ever get that long or productive with only a half day of sun here.

Ate a few Strawberries from plants in pots today too. Some were quite big. By this Fall I will transplant all the Strawberry plants into the ground so they will come back next year and begin multiplying via runners.

Turnips and Carrots I planted from seed into a big 10 gallon pot seem to be growing good, haven't checked for veggies yet, just letting them grow.

I have a patch of chives in the ground that come back every year with no care at all. And of course the Rhubarb.


No. 204     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 20, 2017 at 12:16 PM     

I am glad some are surviving BF. Our heat stroke continues until Thursday. I noticed a yellow and black wasp that burrowed in the ground when watering yesterday (I know of the black kind, but never saw one like this that lives in the ground), so I researched...

And these wasps can be very destructive to one's garden and even house (cut and paste) ... so trying to find out how to rid this problem now:

Though many species of vespids lead a solitary lifestyle and rarely cause us problems, yellow jackets, bald-faced hornets and paper wasps are social insects that live in large colonies. They construct their nests in the ground, in trees, under eves and inside wall voids and attics.

No. 205     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 20, 2017 at 12:36 PM     
CAsandie wrote:


I am glad some are surviving BF. Our heat stroke continues until Thursday. I noticed a yellow and black wasp that burrowed in the ground when watering yesterday (I know of the black kind, but never saw one like this that lives in the ground), so I researched...

And these wasps can be very destructive to one's garden and even house (cut and paste) ... so trying to find out how to rid this problem now:

Though many species of vespids lead a solitary lifestyle and rarely cause us problems, yellow jackets, bald-faced hornets and paper wasps are social insects that live in large colonies. They construct their nests in the ground, in trees, under eves and inside wall voids and attics.



Be careful there. If it a Yellow Jacket they can have large colonies underground. They will all come out and sting you en masse if disturbed.

Destroy the nest at night when they are all in there and somewhat docile.

If it was just one of those, "lone wasp" species, not much to worry about.
No. 206     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 20, 2017 at 12:46 PM     
The weather returned back to normal the last few days, only 76 today and around 80 the last few days.

Until some of the plants develop well established root systems they seem to be susceptible to heat.

No. 207     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 20, 2017 at 3:25 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:


I am glad some are surviving BF. Our heat stroke continues until Thursday. I noticed a yellow and black wasp that burrowed in the ground when watering yesterday (I know of the black kind, but never saw one like this that lives in the ground), so I researched...

And these wasps can be very destructive to one's garden and even house (cut and paste) ... so trying to find out how to rid this problem now:

Though many species of vespids lead a solitary lifestyle and rarely cause us problems, yellow jackets, bald-faced hornets and paper wasps are social insects that live in large colonies. They construct their nests in the ground, in trees, under eves and inside wall voids and attics.



Be careful there. If it a Yellow Jacket they can have large colonies underground. They will all come out and sting you en masse if disturbed.

Destroy the nest at night when they are all in there and somewhat docile.

If it was just one of those, "lone wasp" species, not much to worry about.


Thank you for your advice. Yes, and unfortunately ... it is is yellow and black [looks like a yellow jacket] and larger than the small black ones that do not seem to colonize as much.



No. 208     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 22, 2017 at 9:21 AM     
It's a miracle! :bowdown:

Maybe.

I just checked my gardens after getting home this morning to see if they needed any watering because it's getting hot quick today.

They seem ok due to yesterday's rains.

Anyway after looking at the Loganberry plant I noticed right next to it coming up out of the ground is a new plant. :ban_dance: The stem I planted shows no signs of life. It did when I first planted it and scratched it it had living tissue under the bark.

So it is possible even though the original stem may have died the root was quite alive and is sending up new shoots! I am not saying this is what has happened yet because it could be one of the many Raspberry plants nearby which send up shoots anywhere in the general area where Raspberries have fallen or have spread through underground runners.

But I am crossing my fingers hoping this is what is happening.

Then I looked at the 3 Darrow Blackberry plants I planted which all look dead too and noticed the same exact thing happening next to one of the dead looking branches. Looks like a new shoot has come up out of the ground and has budded leaves. :ban_dance:

Both the possible new Loganberry and this Darrow Blackberry are about 2" tall so far.

Even if only 1 blackberry plant makes it that will be enough because they will multiply like crazy after getting established.

Will have to wait awhile and see when the leaves look bigger if they look any different than my existing Raspberry plants. Too small to tell right now.







No. 209     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 22, 2017 at 9:51 AM     
The Raspberries are ripening faster than I can eat them!

I am eating a handful in the morning when I get home and another handful in the evening when I go to work.

They look much bigger and plumper this year. As big as ones I have bought in stores. Recent rains have likely helped too.

They are growing in a semi-shaded area which does not get a full day's sun, only partial. The giant old Maple tree towering overhead overshadows them, But they seem to be doing quite well with only some sun.

I planted the Blackberries in the same patch and they should do just as well with only a little sun.

Blackberries around here tend to start ripening in July just after Raspberries do in the 3rd week of June.

The Darrow Blackberry variety I got though is an, "Everbearing" variety and tends to produce fruit from midsummer all the way into Fall! I chose this variety so I would ave some to eat every day! Darrow is a vigorous grower reaching 4-7' high. This variety produces berries that are large and sweet and wonderful fresh, frozen, or canned.

http://www.vegetable-gardening-online.com/growing-blackberries.html
No. 210     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 22, 2017 at 9:55 AM     
Another miracle is the one Goji plant that I thought was dead appears to have signs of life with 2 very tiny fresh green leaves. It had looked totally dead.. We'll see what happens with that one.

The other one has pulled through and is growing all kinds of small leaves. Soon it should be fine. Once it gets a little bigger and a more well developed root system i'll plant it into the ground.
No. 211     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 22, 2017 at 11:06 AM     
So happy to hear some of your plants are making it! I'm seeing the possibility of some tasty smoothies this summer!

We finally have a break in our heat warnings here (Praising God). I have a lot to catch up on that I put off due to the weather!

No. 212     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 22, 2017 at 2:39 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Thank you for your advice. Yes, and unfortunately ... it is is yellow and black [looks like a yellow jacket] and larger than the small black ones that do not seem to colonize as much.



https://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/yellowjackets.htm
No. 213     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 22, 2017 at 7:29 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

So happy to hear some of your plants are making it! I'm seeing the possibility of some tasty smoothies this summer!

We finally have a break in our heat warnings here (Praising God). I have a lot to catch up on that I put off due to the weather!



I checked the Goji plants again after waking up this afternoon and getting ready to head back to work and miracle of miracles the Goji plant that was dead now has tiny green leaves growing all along it not just on top like I found this morning! :ban_dance: So it looks like both may survive this unseasonably warm heat until they get stronger and in the ground.

Got up to 90 today but is going to drop down to the 70's to low 80's for about the next week. Going down to 52 at night. Better not get below that or the Goji plants begin dropping leaves and going into dormancy thinking it's Fall! I read anything below 50 is what causes them to do this. Might bring them inside at night and place them back out during the day.

Smoothies yes, I will have to try making some with all those berries and the many more to come eventually.

Looking forward to what those Goji berries are going to taste like. I have read they are super healthy and loaded with nutrients.
No. 214     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 24, 2017 at 10:16 PM     
I am so glad to hear the GOOD news about more plants surviving!!!!

Thank you for the link as well. I need to take care of that problem!

The newest critter in my zoo home is a beloved morning dove. I was pulling weeds and she came along side of me pecking at the ground (My Mom walked up stating it appeared I had a helper)! We saw her gathering sticks ... so she is nesting!! (I love doves).



No. 215     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 25, 2017 at 8:29 AM     
Yellow Jackets vs. Garden Hose.

https://youtu.be/0RUyeP0Tj0U


Another one: https://youtu.be/gh68pjIyYjk
No. 216     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jun 25, 2017 at 6:55 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Yellow Jackets vs. Garden Hose.

https://youtu.be/0RUyeP0Tj0U


Another one: https://youtu.be/gh68pjIyYjk


Funny videos... (ouch...albeit I feel sorry for those filming these).

I might have lone guys instead of a nest (This far I've put dirt in all holes found). I read that a decoy wasp nest can work within a 200 foot perimeter to rid the wasps [not tried and unknown personally...but I've read online at various sites that it works])?



No. 217     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 26, 2017 at 1:03 PM     
Came home this morning and found a number of Snow Peas are ready for harvesting!

These are those pea pods that are eaten whole and raw in the shell in salads.

So tomorrow will have to cut some of my gourmet salad, Spinach, Green Onions, with some Chinese Cabbage and make a bid salad!

Also found gobs of Raspberries ready for picking. I ate a big handful before going to sleep.
No. 218     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 29, 2017 at 3:58 PM     
I notice another one of the BlackBerry plants seems to have a sprout coming from the ground from an otherwise dead looking plant. Too soon to tell if it is a BlackBerry shoot but I think it is.
No. 219     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 29, 2017 at 4:04 PM     
Should be able to start harvesting my first Tomatoes of the season in a few more days, Cherry Tomatoes!

Transplanted 2 more large Tomato plants from pots into the ground, I forgot which variety these were but we shall see lol.

Placed some conduit into the ground for squash plants to start climbing.
No. 220     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 29, 2017 at 4:08 PM     
The Goji plant which died and then came back to life has fully recovered.

I am about ready to transplant 1 of the Aronia Berry plants into the ground. It will go into a shaded fenced off area.
No. 221     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 29, 2017 at 8:52 PM     
Just before leaving for work today I checked the gardens again, ate another handful of Raspberries.

Munched on some Snow Peas straight from the vine. They tasted good enough to eat alone!

Snow Peas produce these cool little Purple & White Flowers and add some color to the garden.
No. 222     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 29, 2017 at 8:55 PM     
Wednesday morning I found 2 Strawberries which were growing in pots on my deck "picked" then moved a few feet away.

A 3rd Strawberry was half eaten.

Conclusion? Likely a Possum. I have caught them climbing around on my deck before.

Most of the Strawberries are gone now but a few of the "Everbearing" ones are still producing some, not ripe yet though.
No. 223     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 3, 2017 at 7:21 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Should be able to start harvesting my first Tomatoes of the season in a few more days, Cherry Tomatoes!

Transplanted 2 more large Tomato plants from pots into the ground, I forgot which variety these were but we shall see lol.

Placed some conduit into the ground for squash plants to start climbing.


Came home after being gone a few days to 2 cherry tomatoes which were orange and ripe enough to eat. They were very sweet.

The Raspberry harvest is dwindling down.

Still lots of snow peas so I ate a bunch.

The tomato plants are really starting to take off.

Tomorrow we transplant more stuff into the ground, mostly some squash plants.

Have to transplant some pepper plants into both pots and into ground
No. 224     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 4, 2017 at 7:23 PM     
Spent the day working outside, trimmed the tree, burned some old branches.

Transplanted some more stuff into the ground, mostly Squash plants.

Transplanted some veggies from a seed starting tray into larger containers too. Mostly Banana and Carnival mix Bell Peppers.

Also transplanted some Strawberry plants into bigger 2-3 gallon pots. Some were stunted in growth, however the best and healthiest Strawberry plant is in a 3 gallon pot.

So I think that's where they will ultimately stay from now on, at least for summer., in bigger pots.

Found 2 Strawberries that were hiding and promptly ate them.

More are on the way and should be ripening soon.

The Snow Peas definitely do well here so will be adding them to the list for next year's veggies. They prefer full sun though and don't seem to like shade.
No. 225     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 4, 2017 at 7:26 PM     
After doing all of the above I then planted some new seed in 3 flats of a whole bunch of different types of veggies.

About 144 cells total think.
No. 226     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 4, 2017 at 8:58 PM     
Do you live in an apartment and only have a balcony? (South facing is best)

Want to grow some apples? Well you can! These will grow in a large pot right on your Balcony! Even people living on boats grow them!



Consider "Columnar Apples" also known as, "Urban Apple" or, "Colonnade Apples". You can sometimes find them for sale in the Spring in local Hardware/Lumber stores. You can order them through the mail though too via a number of online nurseries. They are about $30-$50 each so are more expensive than regular apple trees. (Demand for them is high). The good news is they will produce for about 20 years.

They will grow in Zones 4-9.

You will need to plant 2 DIFFERENT varieties for proper pollination.

This variety was discovered in Canada and only grows 18-24" wide and 8-10' tall!

And yes, it produces FULL sized apples! Lots of them! And they start bearing fruit in 0-1 year.

Preorder them during Winter for shipping in the spring.

Here is one article about them:

http://www.vegetablegardener.com/item/5756/columnar-apple-trees-for-suburban-yards

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/special/urban/growing-columnar-fruit-trees.htm

No. 227     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 4, 2017 at 9:00 PM     
I think I am going to order 2 of the above apple trees soon for spring planting.

This company offers 7 different varieties.

http://www.raintreenursery.com/fruit_trees/apples/columnar_apples/
No. 228     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 4, 2017 at 11:24 PM     
Want Tomatoes in cooler or even cold weather?

These varieties will still set fruit even in cold weather!

Check out these varieties!

Some of these were developed for the US Military for use in Greenland, some are from Canada, and some were developed for use in Alaska. Some are from Russia.

http://www.reimerseeds.com/cold-tolerant-tomato_1483.aspx
No. 229     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 6, 2017 at 10:20 AM     
Came home to some minor damage in the garden left by yesterday's powerful T-Storms that blew through. A Tomato plant on my deck was keeled over and laying on its side.

I placed some zip ties around it and a bamboo pole stuck in a 5 ,gallon bucket.

Zip tied some other tomato plants to poles in the garden, as well as some squash vines.

A few of the 2 1/2' tall Sunflower plants were leaning over but they should recover.
No. 230     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 7, 2017 at 9:00 PM     
Just ordered both Red & Green Malabar Spinach.

Unlike regular Spinach this is not really a "true" Spinach but tastes like Spinach and loves the heat of Summer and does not like cold so is just the opposite of regular Spinach.

Even though not a true Spinach and it grows on a Vine it is chock full of nutrients which I posted earlier about in this thread months ago.

I should have ordered it a month or 2 ago but I should still get a good crop in August and maybe part of September.

$3.95 a pack at Johnny's Selected Seeds: http://www.johnnyseeds.com/search/?q=malabar&lang=en_US

Also ordered some Kale designed for "Overwintering" in the Garden, we shall see on that here in the north!
No. 231     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Jul 8, 2017 at 1:11 PM     
I am not sure what your garden has been fertilized with now.
No. 232     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 8, 2017 at 2:57 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

I am not sure what your garden has been fertilized with now.


I have fencing around most areas of the gardens. So they cannot get into them without climbing over a fence.

They have not been brave enough to try and walk up onto my Deck yet.
No. 233     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Kari   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jul 8, 2017 at 4:04 PM     
Gardening is out this year. Though we have had an abundance of water from the snowpack and heavy rains, the main well pump for our community failed and we are on stage 4 water restrictions like we were last year with the drought. NO outside watering at all.

I don't do veggies ... I DO miss my flowers this year.
No. 234     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 8, 2017 at 8:44 PM     
Hit the jackpot at the library today in the used books for sale section.

I found an almost new, hardcover copy of, "Burpee The Complete Vegetable & Herb Gardener: A Guide To Growing Your Garden Organically".

Being it's from Burpee, the seed company, they should know what they're talking about eh?

It is a quality book, glossy paper, 448 pages, over 300 color photos.

List price is $39.95.

I got it for $2.00.



http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/610559.Burpee_the_Complete_Vegetable_Herb_Gardener
No. 235     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 8, 2017 at 8:50 PM     
Kari wrote:

Gardening is out this year. Though we have had an abundance of water from the snowpack and heavy rains, the main well pump for our community failed and we are on stage 4 water restrictions like we were last year with the drought. NO outside watering at all.

I don't do veggies ... I DO miss my flowers this year.


I would be burying underground soaker hoses. And or drilling my own well, underground storage tank, etc.

No one is gonna tell me I can't have water to grow food for me to eat and survive and or use water from the sky which God gives.

And if any new age nazi doesn't like that, well that's just tough!
No. 236     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Kari   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jul 9, 2017 at 10:28 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Kari wrote:

Gardening is out this year. Though we have had an abundance of water from the snowpack and heavy rains, the main well pump for our community failed and we are on stage 4 water restrictions like we were last year with the drought. NO outside watering at all.

I don't do veggies ... I DO miss my flowers this year.


I would be burying underground soaker hoses. And or drilling my own well, underground storage tank, etc.

No one is gonna tell me I can't have water to grow food for me to eat and survive and or use water from the sky which God gives.

And if any new age nazi doesn't like that, well that's just tough!


well, that's not exactly how it works. If there IS no water, or so little it has to be designated for indoor use only for such as bathrooms, showers, drinking, cooking, etc. it is what it is. When a community well is broken.... the well is broken.

Water restrictions and conservation should be taken into consideration when deciding on starting an edible home garden. If local water allocation allows for an edible garden, homeowners can grow fruits and vegetables in their backyard using water-wise practices. If I need to conserve water for the good of myself and my neighbors, I can afford to go to the store and pass on the garden.

But, as i said, I don't do home veggie gardens. So Either way, I'm good.
No. 237     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 12, 2017 at 12:06 PM     
Went to check on the gardens during a break in today's T-Storms.

Found 4 ripe Supersweet100 Cherry Tomatoes, which I promptly ate!

Tons more are growing and in the way.

The Yellow Cherry Tomatoes are producing quite well, none ripe yet though.

All other Tomato plants of various kinds are growing up to Tennis Ball size or so they should be ready for slicing onto sandwiches soon.

Squash vines I had to trim and tie up training them up on poles as they get quickly out of hand.

Had some seedlings of various veggies in pots die off due to recent heat girrh.

The Snow Peas amazingly are still producing and making those small purple and white Flowers which look exactly like old time Women's Hair Bonnets!
No. 238     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 12, 2017 at 12:08 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

I am not sure what your garden has been fertilized with now.


I'm not sure either, but it should be good...
No. 239     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 12, 2017 at 1:25 PM     
Kari wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Kari wrote:

Gardening is out this year. Though we have had an abundance of water from the snowpack and heavy rains, the main well pump for our community failed and we are on stage 4 water restrictions like we were last year with the drought. NO outside watering at all.

I don't do veggies ... I DO miss my flowers this year.


I would be burying underground soaker hoses. And or drilling my own well, underground storage tank, etc.

No one is gonna tell me I can't have water to grow food for me to eat and survive and or use water from the sky which God gives.

And if any new age nazi doesn't like that, well that's just tough!


well, that's not exactly how it works. If there IS no water, or so little it has to be designated for indoor use only for such as bathrooms, showers, drinking, cooking, etc. it is what it is. When a community well is broken.... the well is broken.

Water restrictions and conservation should be taken into consideration when deciding on starting an edible home garden. If local water allocation allows for an edible garden, homeowners can grow fruits and vegetables in their backyard using water-wise practices. If I need to conserve water for the good of myself and my neighbors, I can afford to go to the store and pass on the garden.

But, as i said, I don't do home veggie gardens. So Either way, I'm good.


Oh that IS exactly how it works!

You are putting the cart before the horse there!

The time to store rainwater is when it is raining not during a drought!

Lots of people do just that, every year.

That way when the droughts come they have enough water for their, "indoor" food gardens.

And thus, food to eat, as well as water to drink.

Any government forcing you to, "buy your water or food elsewhere" is doing the same thing communist countries taught and did.

In communist USSR it was as iLLEGAL to, "grow your own vegetables".

California and a few other areas are attempting to do the same thing.

That's communism.

What you have are a bunch of new age Nazis who are worshipping the creation rather than the creator...
No. 240     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 12, 2017 at 1:33 PM     
We're under a flash flood warning for a few more hours.

There was a lake out back between 2 mobile homes.

I seem to be on high enough ground to avoid that.
I had to drain 3 seedling trays of excess water and put them in the shed for now to dry out some.

Some stuff has sprouted over the last few days and will have to go into pots soon
No. 241     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 12, 2017 at 2:23 PM     
There is a factor that no local government who is hell bent on against you having or growing a fruit, nut, or vegetable garden will tell you or acknowledge.

And that fact is that the minute produce is picked off the vine or plant it's nutrient content starts divebombing.

Crops are then transported by rail, truck, and even ship so that by the time the produce reaches the store sometimes weeks later where it sits on the the shelf for even more days many of the nutrients have dwindled down to nothing or a fraction of what they were when first picked off the vine

That is a proven scientific fact you cannot get around unless you grow your own food, or visit a, "pick your own" Farm. Or buy at a Farmer's Market where the food is likely fresher. (And I don't mean Whole Foods either).

Any government who tells you you are required to buy your food from a store and cannot grow your own is opening themselves up for a lawsuit.

What they are doing is attempting to interfere with your health and well being.

Store bought produce is NOT the same as that picked directly and recently from the garden!

You won't find any Biblical basis for buying your food in a grocery store either.

It is an invention of modern man and is only recent during the last 100 years or so.

And we see in our modern society the fruits of such a policy as well with all the many illnesses people are plagued with.

This largely has to do with eating all that dead, lifeless processed food.
No. 242     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Kari   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jul 12, 2017 at 4:03 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Kari wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Kari wrote:

Gardening is out this year. Though we have had an abundance of water from the snowpack and heavy rains, the main well pump for our community failed and we are on stage 4 water restrictions like we were last year with the drought. NO outside watering at all.

I don't do veggies ... I DO miss my flowers this year.


I would be burying underground soaker hoses. And or drilling my own well, underground storage tank, etc.

No one is gonna tell me I can't have water to grow food for me to eat and survive and or use water from the sky which God gives.

And if any new age nazi doesn't like that, well that's just tough!


well, that's not exactly how it works. If there IS no water, or so little it has to be designated for indoor use only for such as bathrooms, showers, drinking, cooking, etc. it is what it is. When a community well is broken.... the well is broken.

Water restrictions and conservation should be taken into consideration when deciding on starting an edible home garden. If local water allocation allows for an edible garden, homeowners can grow fruits and vegetables in their backyard using water-wise practices. If I need to conserve water for the good of myself and my neighbors, I can afford to go to the store and pass on the garden.

But, as i said, I don't do home veggie gardens. So Either way, I'm good.


Oh that IS exactly how it works!

You are putting the cart before the horse there!

The time to store rainwater is when it is raining not during a drought!

Lots of people do just that, every year.

That way when the droughts come they have enough water for their, "indoor" food gardens.

And thus, food to eat, as well as water to drink.

Any government forcing you to, "buy your water or food elsewhere" is doing the same thing communist countries taught and did.

In communist USSR it was as iLLEGAL to, "grow your own vegetables".

California and a few other areas are attempting to do the same thing.

That's communism.

What you have are a bunch of new age Nazis who are worshipping the creation rather than the creator...


well BF, that might be EXACTLY how it would work for you. we have no regrets being hooked up to a community well. On the entire mountain I believe two homeowners have private wells and they are ranchers with several hundred acres or so. I don't want to be put in a position defending our choice to not drill a well. I understand you wanting that option should you live on property. For us, we don't plant gardens.... we go to the store and we go to the local farmers markets. I realize we have survivalists here...... but again, I am not going to be put in the position of defending our choices.

Dan has lived up here since 1978. He has done fine.... Owned three homes, this one being his third. All in the same community with the same community wells. We have amazing delicious water... it comes from the Sierras and is clear clean and yummy. But like any well, it can break down. Thus we conserve and respect the drought rules while it's repaired.

If we wanted a private well, we'd drill. We don't, so we won't If we wanted to store water, we'd haul in a tank. We're good. I was sharing our community well had a problem in my original post, not looking for a debate.

I certainly won't defend California's politics or foolish laws. But I respect water conservation.... I live in a dry drought ridden state. There are provisions in the water restriction laws for home gardens. BUT that isn't the point. The point was BROKEN well/conserve until repaired.

(modified for a spelling error)

No. 243     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 19, 2017 at 3:37 PM     
Did some gardening the last few hours in the early afternoon.

Big mistake! I sweated, panted, huffed and puffed. And it is only 89 fedrees out but feels much hotter, hard to breathe out there! Part of that could be my hayfever kicking in with a lot of pollen in the air it does make breathing a chore when hot and humid out.

I normally do my gardening early in the morning when it is cool. It is very pleasant out at that time.

Cut weeds, grass, transplanted some Squash seedlings into containers, and 2 into the ground.

Found a medium sized Toad hopping around in the grass near my garden.

Ate a Cherry Tomato.

I found 2 huge Strawberries hiding under the leaves in a large pot I have the plant in. This plant by Bonnie Plants, "Allstar" variety, and everbearing is my healthiest plant. It was sending out long runners over the sides of the pot about 3' long so I [pinched them off which should steer it towards more Strawberry production. This variety should produce berries all summer long.

The berries were the size of golf balls, and tasted much better than those bought in the store!

Unfortunately 1 of the Aronia plants died in the heat the other day. It never did grow like the other one did, which is about 10" tall now. It stayed about 2" tall and that's it. I think it's root system never developed.

I transplanted the surviving one and 1 of the Goji plants, both of which are doing well into bigger pots.
No. 244     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jul 31, 2017 at 10:35 PM     
Bullfighter wrote: I normally do my gardening early in the morning when it is cool.


Early morning gardening is a necessity here!

Due to hurting my knee, I didn't get everything done this season, unfortunately.

I will be having the teens from Church come help. On the transplanting though...I might hire a professional gardener now (the doc told me today no gardening until healed and scolded me for continuing to do rough gardening when injured).

I had no idea we could chip a bone and keep walking (I also thought there would be more pain associated with a chipped bone).


No. 245     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 8, 2017 at 12:24 AM     
Well tomorrow I tackle the Gardening chores.

A Zucchini Plant is 8' tall and climbing. I am starting to see 2" long Zucchinis forming so I should soon be swimming in them.

Anyone have any recipes or things to do or make with Zucchini???
No. 246     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 8, 2017 at 12:27 AM     
Have been eating a handful of ripe cherry and grape tomatoes everyday when I get home and also when going to work.

Will have to bring some with me to work to put into salads.

The yellow ones are great too and have lots of those growing.

No. 247     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 8, 2017 at 12:30 AM     
Have a bunch of medium sized Tomatoes which are ripe for picking also. Will have to start making fresh Salsa with those.

The Mexican Red Beans are forming Bean Pods now so I should be able to start picking those in a few weeks.

They are beans designed for drying and saving.
No. 248     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 8, 2017 at 9:22 PM     
Just came back from Wallyworld had to pick up a few supplies.

One of which was to make Salsa.

Bought a White Onion, chopped up half of it.

Chopped up 5 fresh Tomatoes I picked right off the vines at hoe]me in my Garden. 2 of those were growing in a 5 gallon bucket, the plant seems to be doing well and lots more green tomatoes are still on the vine.

Chopped up 1 Garlic Clove bought at Walmart.

Chopped up 3 yellow, red, and orange mini sweet peppers bought at Walmart. (My sweet peppers haven't formed yet).

Then added a little Pace brand restaurant style salsa, "Three Pepper Style" which has, Guajillo, Ancho & Pasilla peppers in it. (Hey, they were clearing it out for only $1 for a jar so...).

Then finally picked 2 "Dragon Cayenne" peppers from my plant growing in a pot.

Mixed it all up, dipped a round tortilla chip in it, put it in my mouth then.... WHOA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :icon_eek::help:



There IS a reason I found out they call it a, "Dragon Cayenne"!!! (As in fire breathing dragon!) This is no ordinary Cayenne pepper!!! These are hotter than a firecracker!

I had to test the Pace Salsa to see if that was what was hot, nope, that was mild, barely even had any bit to it. It says "Medium" on the lid but medium always seems mild to me.

It was the 2 Dragon Cayenne peppers I added from my plant that were so hot.

I've grown and had hotter peppers such as Habeneros, but these are by far the hottest Cayenne peppers I have ever grown.

Sure glad I only bought one of these plants, and I did not grow or buy any other hot peppers this year, just this one, and it will be all I need! :icon_eek:
No. 249     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 8, 2017 at 10:20 PM     
A little digging and I found out why they are so hot.

The Dragon Cayenne Pepper is actually a, "Cross" between a Dragon Thai Pepper and a Cayenne pepper.

So it gets it's hotness from the Thai pepper which is really hot.

Dragon Cayenne Peppers are 20 times hotter than standard cayenne peppers according to one YouTube video.

30-50,000 SHU's.

Found a number of YouTube videos where people did the, "Dragon Cayenne Pepper Challenge", lol.
No. 250     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 8, 2017 at 11:05 PM     
It made my nose run.

If your sinuses are ever clogged up just eat one of these Dragon Cayenne babies and that will clear it right up!
No. 251     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Aug 9, 2017 at 12:46 PM     
Anyone have any recipes or things to do or make with Zucchini???


I love Zucchini steamed with 'spike' seasoning and Parmesan cheese.

but...

Zucchini boats are easy and fun to make (scoop and keep the insides of the zucchini making a boat that you can fill it with meat, peppers, the rest of the zucchini chopped and cheese ... pop it in the oven for a bit and voila ... yummy zucchini boats). Likely lots of recipes online, but that is the basic (turkey bacon bits go well to top the boats as well).

(no way btw I'd get near one of those dragon cayenne peppers)! I would grind them and put them around the house though to deter wildlife!!!





No. 252     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Kari   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Aug 9, 2017 at 9:37 PM     
not sure if you'd like this one because of the sugar. But we love zucchini bread.

Ingredients

3 cups shredded zucchini (2 to 3 medium)
1 2/3 cups sugar
2/3 cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons vanilla
4 eggs
3 cups Gold Medal™ all-purpose or whole wheat flour
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup coarsely chopped nuts
1/2 cup raisins, if desired

(sometimes I leave out the raisins)
1
Move oven rack to low position so that tops of pans will be in center of oven. Heat oven to 350°F. Grease bottoms only of 2 (8x4-inch) loaf pans or 1 (9x5-inch) loaf pan with shortening or cooking spray.
2
In large bowl, stir zucchini, sugar, oil, vanilla and eggs until well mixed. Stir in remaining ingredients except nuts and raisins. Stir in nuts and raisins. Divide batter evenly between 8-inch pans or pour into 9-inch pan.
3
Bake 8-inch loaves 50 to 60 minutes, 9-inch loaf 1 hour 10 minutes to 1 hour 20 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pans on cooling rack 10 minutes.
4
Loosen sides of loaves from pans; remove from pans and place top side up on cooling rack. Cool completely, about 2 hours, before slicing. Wrap tightly and it can be stored at room temperature up to 4 days, or refrigerated up to 10 days.
No. 253     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 14, 2017 at 10:28 PM     
After getting home today I found some of my plants in pots dead or half dead, which I knew would be the case when I got back. Gave them all a drink of water, we'll see what survived by tomorrow if when they perk back up. Before leaving I had taken the precaution if moving a Goji plants and an Aronia berry plant into the shed and away from the sun. That idea worked great, the soil was still moist and they were fine.
No. 254     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 14, 2017 at 10:32 PM     
7 tennis ball sized Tomatoes were ripe so I picked those, some cherry, grape and yellow cherry Tomatoes are ripe too. Tomorrow will make more salsa and a salad.

Some more Strawberries are ripe also. Wil eat those. More Squash grew.
No. 255     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Aug 15, 2017 at 11:46 AM     
My grandfather used to make little bird cages from squash and my grandmother painted them vibrant colors to attract the birds.

I hope your plants perk back up! I have one that I keep watering that just bloomed (flowering plant) that looks like I should cut it down (but I keep hoping it will make it as so many surprise me like this)!

No. 256     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Aug 15, 2017 at 11:52 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

After getting home today I found some of my plants in pots dead or half dead, which I knew would be the case when I got back. Gave them all a drink of water, we'll see what survived by tomorrow if when they perk back up. Before leaving I had taken the precaution if moving a Goji plants and an Aronia berry plant into the shed and away from the sun. That idea worked great, the soil was still moist and they were fine.


I do not have any where near the size garden I once maintained, but I have implemented various automatic watering methods. Plants are watered whether I am home or gone.
No. 257     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Aug 15, 2017 at 12:05 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:
I do not have any where near the size garden I once maintained, but I have implemented various automatic watering methods. Plants are watered whether I am home or gone.


I do have to make sure the bulk sources are filled before leaving for an extended period. I turn off the water supply to my entire home when I leave for more than 2-3 days.
No. 258     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 15, 2017 at 12:23 PM     
I have had automatic watering timers and used them for the drip irrigation hoses laid out in the gardens. But have to pick up an irrigation kit designed for pots with small drip emitters
No. 259     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Aug 15, 2017 at 12:24 PM     
I turn off the water supply to my entire home when I leave for more than 2-3 days.


This is wise!

No. 260     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 16, 2017 at 9:00 AM     
CAsandie wrote:

I turn off the water supply to my entire home when I leave for more than 2-3 days.


This is wise!



Especially in Winter here in the North.

Ever seen any horror photos of homeowners who went away on vacation only to have their pipes freeze then break and then thaw out?

It makes quite a frozen mess and can ruin everything in the house including the house itself in some cases!
No. 261     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Aug 16, 2017 at 9:46 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

I turn off the water supply to my entire home when I leave for more than 2-3 days.


This is wise!



Especially in Winter here in the North.

Ever seen any horror photos of homeowners who went away on vacation only to have their pipes freeze then break and then thaw out?

It makes quite a frozen mess and can ruin everything in the house including the house itself in some cases!


I have an uncle whom went on an extended 30+ day vacation during the summer, to arrive back home and find like $30000+ in water damage to his home and businesses contained within.

My cousin was supposed to be checking on the home every couple of days, watering plants, etc., but never did check the lower level. Under the kitchen sink on the main level, a line to the faucet had started leaking badly. By the time my uncle arrived home, he said the lower level was flooded and like a sauna.

From that lower level he operated a photo and videography studio with several professional cameras, several professional printers, and a complete traditional professional darkroom for developing and printing film. He also operated an income tax preparation business from that level having several computers. My aunt also operated a beauty salon located on the lower level. Much of the equipment and furniture was damaged in that lower level. If it was not sitting in water, water had been dripping onto it for several days. In addition, much of the supporting rafters and flooring of the main level had to be replaced.
No. 262     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 21, 2017 at 8:30 AM     
Looks like we got a lot of rain here at home overnight. None at work.

Won't have to water anything today.

Found some more ripe Tomatoes ready to pick. One has teeth marks in it though from an Opossum or a Racoon.

Some Squash are getting big!

Some Sunflowers are 6' tall and forming heads.

Found one line ripe red raspberry, strange, doesn't it know this is August and not June anymore??? It is not a twice bearing type as far err as I remember anyway.

More ripe cherry Tomatoes.

A bunch of new Strawberries forming.
No. 263     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Aug 21, 2017 at 12:17 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

I turn off the water supply to my entire home when I leave for more than 2-3 days.


This is wise!



Especially in Winter here in the North.

Ever seen any horror photos of homeowners who went away on vacation only to have their pipes freeze then break and then thaw out?

It makes quite a frozen mess and can ruin everything in the house including the house itself in some cases!


My Grandmother's pipes froze every winter -- it had to do with her water softener I think (not sure).

BF wrote: I have an uncle whom went on an extended 30+ day vacation during the summer, to arrive back home and find like $30000+ in water damage to his home and businesses contained within.


Oh, no! When using insurance as well ... our prices increase (which I don't think is fair, but it appears to occur more times than not).

An Uncle in TX had a home destroyed 3 times by tornadoes (I think I shared this before). Him being a general contractor sure helped out, but the 'starting over' is super rough.

On this mini-vacation shared here ... I came home to a fence down (I can't imagine coming home to a flooded house ). My Brother had a pipe burst here and so I imagine your Uncle had to leave the premises (thus a non-desired hotel stay while reconstruction took place). **sigh

No. 264     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 21, 2017 at 2:42 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

I turn off the water supply to my entire home when I leave for more than 2-3 days.


This is wise!



Especially in Winter here in the North.

Ever seen any horror photos of homeowners who went away on vacation only to have their pipes freeze then break and then thaw out?

It makes quite a frozen mess and can ruin everything in the house including the house itself in some cases!


My Grandmother's pipes froze every winter -- it had to do with her water softener I think (not sure).

BF wrote: I have an uncle whom went on an extended 30+ day vacation during the summer, to arrive back home and find like $30000+ in water damage to his home and businesses contained within.


Oh, no! When using insurance as well ... our prices increase (which I don't think is fair, but it appears to occur more times than not).

An Uncle in TX had a home destroyed 3 times by tornadoes (I think I shared this before). Him being a general contractor sure helped out, but the 'starting over' is super rough.

On this mini-vacation shared here ... I came home to a fence down (I can't imagine coming home to a flooded house ). My Brother had a pipe burst here and so I imagine your Uncle had to leave the premises (thus a non-desired hotel stay while reconstruction took place). **sigh



I did not write that about pipes bursting Survivor did.
No. 265     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Aug 22, 2017 at 1:48 PM     
BF -- Whoops sorry - :-p (I answered your first part about pipes freezing and was on a roll there)!!!

Fixed below! ...


-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Survivor wrote: I have an uncle whom went on an extended 30+ day vacation during the summer, to arrive back home and find like $30000+ in water damage to his home and businesses contained within.



When using insurance as well ... our prices increase (which I don't think is fair, but it appears to occur more times than not). An Uncle in TX had a home destroyed 3 times by tornadoes (I think I shared this before). Him being a general contractor sure helped out, but the 'starting over' is super rough.

On this mini-vacation shared here ... I came home to a fence down (I can't imagine coming home to a flooded house ). My Brother had a pipe burst here and so I imagine your Uncle had to leave the premises (thus a non-desired hotel stay while reconstruction took place).

No. 266     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Aug 25, 2017 at 11:19 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:
Small so far about 2" long but it won't be long before i'll be making pickles!


I rarely eat pickles, often removing them from what foods I do eat that have them on it.

Again this year, pickles rank on the list of the 75 most harmful foods to eat.

But those are store bought industry processed pickles. Likely homemade pickles would not make such a list.
No. 267     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 64   on  Aug 25, 2017 at 12:08 PM     
Agriculture is rather big in the Dominican Republic. I look forward to going to the mercados (local stores, or fruit & veggie stores) to purchase my fruits and vegetables, all organic.

At present I do not know what sort of residence I will find, but my hope would be it will allow me to do some of my own growing.

My first choice of what to grow? Tomatoes! Tomatoes are in season locally and I am eating a lot of them!

Cotton-candy grapes should be in the next week or so also.
No. 268     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 31, 2017 at 8:30 PM     
I picked a Spaghetti Squash today. It is still green but will eventually ripen. It has a very hard shell and they can store for long periods of time.

I will likely bring it to work, nuke it in the microwave, chop up some Tomatoes from the garden and eat it like Spaghetti.

There is one more big one ready to soon pick also.

There are many more flowers this plant and the Bumblebees seem to love them.
No. 269     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 31, 2017 at 8:33 PM     
A Zucchini plant in a small pot is starting to produce fruit. Will have to transplant it into a large pot or into the ground and I should soon be swimming in those.
No. 270     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 31, 2017 at 8:35 PM     
The giant Sunflowers are starting to produce seed heads which seem to be rapidly multiplying creating more seeds everyday.

One plant is over 7' tall with a 1" stalk now.
No. 271     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 31, 2017 at 8:39 PM     
The Mexican Red beans have produced lots of seed pods but I guess you have to wait until they dry out before harvesting them all then let them cure.

They are a type of bean meant for storing dry.
No. 272     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 31, 2017 at 8:40 PM     
Weather has been cooling off have to get busy and plant some Spinach and Lettuce which is when they do best.
No. 273     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 31, 2017 at 8:41 PM     
I have Turnips and Carrots growing in a large tub on the ground but haven't checked them for any fruit. The greens are large however and I can cook those. They are quite healthy.
No. 274     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 31, 2017 at 8:43 PM     
One of the Everbearing Strawberry plants in a large pot is producing lots of berries and I should be able to start picking them tomorrow and the next few days.
No. 275     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  RadioPreacherMan   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Aug 31, 2017 at 8:56 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

One of the Everbearing Strawberry plants in a large pot is producing lots of berries and I should be able to start picking them tomorrow and the next few days.



Oh boy !

I'm sure you are in for a treat !

No. 276     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 31, 2017 at 9:13 PM     
RadioPreacherMan wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

One of the Everbearing Strawberry plants in a large pot is producing lots of berries and I should be able to start picking them tomorrow and the next few days.



Oh boy !

I'm sure you are in for a treat !



Oh yeah! I had some earlier this year and they sure were good, much better tasting than store bought!

Today i noticed my Goji Berry plants are producing flowers! I may even have some Goji berries to eat soon! Goji berries have all kinds of health benefits!
No. 277     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Sep 1, 2017 at 10:14 AM     
BF -- Yums (about your harvest this year)! Glad the gojies survived (great health benefits indeed).

I have a tree trimmer coming this morning (we have a tool for trimming, but with my injured knee...doc said no more heavy gardening).

This gardener told me that transplanting in fall here tends to work and he even recommends it (due to the high heat/no rain) conditions. I was happy to hear this.

(I sure wish I could have done it all myself this year. It is awesome working the land).




No. 278     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Sep 5, 2017 at 10:13 PM     
Came home yesterday and noticed the Sunflowers have opened up! They have true yellow flowers now.
No. 279     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Sep 5, 2017 at 10:17 PM     
Have been having a serious problem with, "powdery mildew" attacking the leaves on the squash plants.

It also attacked the cucumber leaves last year.

So in Walmart today a kid asked if he could help me?

I told him my above problem and he knew right where to go and which bottle to grab.

He showed me some eco-friendly stuff and it was only $4 a spray bottle so that's what I got.

Will try it out tomorrow.
No. 280     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 2, 2017 at 9:07 AM     
By George I have GOJI Berries! :ban_dance:

Maybe 2 dozen of them. The plants are now 3-4 feet tall.

Most of the berries are green but a few have turned orange.

I decided to be brave and try an orange one.

A very strange taste, kinda "medicine like". Not sweet, sour or bitter.

Maybe they need to get red yet? I can't remember if they ripen red or orange when fully ripe. Will have to research them some more.

They are starting to shed their leaves being it's been below 50 at night off and on, down to 44 some nights.

They begin entering dormancy in Fall when the temperature drops below 50.

I have to get them planted into the ground yet soon, they are still in 4" pots. I must admit once the root system gets established with these plants you can't kill em! Very hardy!
No. 281     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Oct 2, 2017 at 12:10 PM     
A very strange taste, kinda "medicine like". Not sweet, sour or bitter.


They do have a different taste (a flavor to acquire a taste for).

I'm glad your plants flourished though!

I am paying a gardener to finish what I could not (a lot of work this year).

Goji might be best in smoothies (mixed with other fruits). It tastes almost like a spice when mixed with other fruits and yogurt in a blender.

No. 282     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 3, 2017 at 6:38 AM     
CAsandie wrote:

A very strange taste, kinda "medicine like". Not sweet, sour or bitter.


They do have a different taste (a flavor to acquire a taste for).

I'm glad your plants flourished though!

I am paying a gardener to finish what I could not (a lot of work this year).

Goji might be best in smoothies (mixed with other fruits). It tastes almost like a spice when mixed with other fruits and yogurt in a blender.



After reading the article on the below link it appears they do not become sweet until they are red.

So I picked the orange one too soon. They should be allowed to ripen on the vine for weeks until they become bright red, that's when they are sweetest.

Frost can lesson the sweetness though. They will tolerate hard frosts but should be picked before frosts then allowed to ripen inside until red.

There are 2 recipes on the link, one for Goji Salsa which i'll try considering I have lots of Tomatoes. And another recipe for Goji Breakfast bars.

https://www.provenwinners.com/http%3A/%252Fwww.provenwinners.com/vitaminberries

Even if mine never become sweet i'll still eat them due to all the health benefits i've read about them.
No. 283     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Oct 3, 2017 at 2:35 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

A very strange taste, kinda "medicine like". Not sweet, sour or bitter.


They do have a different taste (a flavor to acquire a taste for).

I'm glad your plants flourished though!

I am paying a gardener to finish what I could not (a lot of work this year).

Goji might be best in smoothies (mixed with other fruits). It tastes almost like a spice when mixed with other fruits and yogurt in a blender.



After reading the article on the below link it appears they do not become sweet until they are red.

So I picked the orange one too soon. They should be allowed to ripen on the vine for weeks until they become bright red, that's when they are sweetest.

Frost can lesson the sweetness though. They will tolerate hard frosts but should be picked before frosts then allowed to ripen inside until red.

There are 2 recipes on the link, one for Goji Salsa which i'll try considering I have lots of Tomatoes. And another recipe for Goji Breakfast bars.

https://www.provenwinners.com/http%3A/%252Fwww.provenwinners.com/vitaminberries

Even if mine never become sweet i'll still eat them due to all the health benefits i've read about them.


My taste buds could be different, but even when fully ripe, I do not find these like sweet berries (more spicy like mangoes to me anyway). Let me know what you think when eating the fully ripe ones.

I could see them fitting in a salsa perfectly!!!! Mango in salsas, I love too (and pineapple to cut the heat).

No. 284     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Nov 16, 2017 at 2:45 AM     
Finally got the 2 Goji plants transplanted into the ground as well as the lone Aronia plant.

The Goji plants have pretty much shed all their leaves although there are still some green berries left on them.

The Aronia plant still has it's leaves, very cold hardy plant, but the leaves are turning a purple color kinda like the cherry bushes.

The Goji Plants I planted in a sunny spot, as they need that, and the Aronia plant in partial sun/shade since they can tolerate shade I read.

Hopefully they will make it through the winter without dying off. I'll place a bunch of dead tree leaves around the base of the Goji plants for insulation to protect the roots since they can die if subjected to severe subzero weather.
No. 285     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Nov 16, 2017 at 4:07 AM     
::drink:
No. 286     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Nov 16, 2017 at 4:23 AM     
Finally ate one of the Spaghetti Squashes I picked maybe a month and a half ago.

I nuked it in the micowave for about 10 minutes after poking numerous holes in 9it to prevent tit from blowing up.

Once done it is best to let it sit for another 10 minutes or so so the steam inside can continue cooking it.

It was soft on the outside so was done.

I sliced it in half, removed all the seeds with a fork, then began twirling the squash strands with the fork until I had, "Spaghetti"!

I think you can roast or eat the seeds too I have read, but I didn't

I then poured Spaghetti sauce into both halves and mixed it all up.

Was pretty good!

I have one more larger one at home yet to cook. Maybe this weekend i'll do a fancier recipe with it.

An employee here at work never even knew about Spaghetti Squash, he said he never heard of it.
No. 287     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Nov 19, 2017 at 9:54 AM     

I love squash (my Grandfather grew all kinds).

I am rather glad that the weather is allowing me to finish some gardening that I was unable to finish earlier this year / in the 90's next week (I feel like Lord is in the driver's seat and I'm along for the ride as far as the way things are working out in some ways [transplanting the plants that I could not earlier this year and before surgery].

No. 288     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 64   on  Nov 19, 2017 at 10:55 AM     
CAsandie wrote:


I love squash (my Grandfather grew all kinds).

I am rather glad that the weather is allowing me to finish some gardening that I was unable to finish earlier this year / in the 90's next week (I feel like Lord is in the driver's seat and I'm along for the ride as far as the way things are working out in some ways [transplanting the plants that I could not earlier this year and before surgery].



Sandie, with all that great weather SD has, can you grow year around?
No. 289     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Nov 19, 2017 at 3:31 PM     
Hi Storm, I can with my red apple (it's a ground covering that is still in bloom currently), but I think plants have their own growth cycles. My sugar plum tree only bloomed once a year for example regardless of the long summers).





No. 290     Reply: Re: Re: Gardening   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 64   on  Nov 19, 2017 at 7:12 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

My sugar plum tree only bloomed once a year for example regardless of the long summers).



Think I can picture you in a sugar plum fairy outfit picking out those sugar plums...

No. 291     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Nov 20, 2017 at 5:47 PM     

She plays lovely violin.

Mod: to say quite an imagination there though. I have a photo on FB of me with a shovel in Bermuda shorts/no makeup...straw hat (my gardening attire)! :-p



No. 292     Reply: Re: Gardening   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Nov 22, 2017 at 9:21 PM     
I forgot I have some Turnips and multi colored carrots in a huge tub planter I have to dig through to pull out anything that might have grown.

I am running out of days to do this! Still have some warm weather in the 40's the next week or so though. Once the soil in that tub is frozen solid, forget it.