MeetChristians.com Tour

Private
Mailbox

Quick
Search

Detailed
Search

Member
Forums

Live
Chat

Polls
space

User
Tools

Help
space

Log Off
space
MeetChristians.com / Forums / General Discussion

No. 0     Original Topic:  Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 1, 2011 at 11:32 AM   Viewed 38521 times     
I am somewhat astounded (but pleased) that interest and awareness of what is going on in our society, both outward and behind closed doors, is happening to the extent that it is on MC.

Given that, and shodan's thread on tornados and preps, I am thinking that a thread to discuss the merits or not of specific types of gear that would be of help in a local, regional, or national disaster might garner quite a bit of interest. Over the last couple of years my brother and I have researched, bought, and tested a large amount of equipment, the results I can share. And I'm sure there are several others here who have a lot of experience also.

This would not be a thread for arguing political, economic, or social issues, only points of interest on survival equipment.

So what do you think? Anyone interested in doing this?
No. 1     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  pennsenator46   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  May 1, 2011 at 3:08 PM     
MRE's
No. 2     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 51   on  May 1, 2011 at 9:18 PM     
A few years ago they were selling tornado shelters outside of my local Ace Hardware store, they were not the kind you put in the ground, instead they were beefed up little buildings, very small, only fit 4 people but this is all I would need, I live in a trailer park so this would be perfect, I'm thinking the price was like 1200 bucks, I could be wrong, they were very heavily built though but I haven't seen them now in a long time, I will have to look around, I would spend 1200.00 on such, even 1500.00 but only if I could take it with me when I moved.
No. 3     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Obadiah   Gender: F   Age: 46   on  May 2, 2011 at 11:41 AM     
http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_listing.jsp?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302696669&plistshowall=true

I have thought of getting something for water purification but do not want to get something that sits in the closet for the next 10 or more years and is never used.

No. 4     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 2, 2011 at 8:33 PM     
Obadiah wrote:

http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_listing.jsp?FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id=2534374302696669&plistshowall=true

I have thought of getting something for water purification but do not want to get something that sits in the closet for the next 10 or more years and is never used.



There are many manufacturers, but I currently have Berky filters. You can purchase a tabletop model that can be used from your kitchen.

http://directive21.com/products.html

Myself, I have a 'Travel Berky' that can be used in the kitchen or at a campsite - the somewhat smaller size works out well. Here is my Berkly at the Dirttime 10 wilderness survival thingy in Wyoming last summer. The Berkey proved to be so popular that someone 'lifted' it over to the table in the picture, placing it in an honored position between the orange drink and the coffee tank...




Incidently, the supplier of the Berky that I use, 'The Berky Guy', is having a special on heirloom seeds until Friday. I just sent him $150 for the small, portable 'Go Berky' a few days ago and now I am considering this deal, which will give him a very good week from me -

http://directive21.com/emergencyseedbank.html
No. 5     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 51   on  May 2, 2011 at 8:44 PM     
Simply incredible! a whopping 25 year shelf life food, nitrogen packed, Thanks Storm!

http://directive21.com/wisefoodstorage.html
No. 6     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 2, 2011 at 9:28 PM     
I haven't tried those yet, though I'm sure they're good if Jeff, 'The Berky Guy', sells them.

Personally, since I am single I don't need to buy in large lots, so I go to Wallyworld and get the Mountain House freeze-dried meals, which last for many years. I specifically like the Beef Stroganoff and the Lasagne.
No. 7     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 5, 2011 at 9:27 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

There are many manufacturers, but I currently have Berky filters. You can purchase a tabletop model that can be used from your kitchen.

http://directive21.com/products.html




I have bid on the Berky guy's stuff on eBay, where it sells for much less than on his website.
No. 8     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  obadiah   Gender: F   Age: 46   on  May 5, 2011 at 10:56 PM     
MEC does not have a berkley.
this one seems popular. it is swiss.
Katadyn Pocket Water Filter 300 dollars

Weight: 550g

This workhorse filter for extended travel or expedition use (proven over decades) is now improved with a round pump handle with a shock absorber for easier and more comfortable pumping, and a screw-on outlet hose which makes directing filtered water into bottles and bags much easier. Silver impregnation minimizes internal bacterial growth.

Filters up to 1L / minute.
The 0.2 micron ceramic filter is effective against all protozoa, and most bacteria (including smaller ones such as Campylobacter).
Nominal filter element life of 50,000L.


this other one is very expensive almost 1000 dollars
Katadyn Survivor 06 Water Desalinator

Weight: 1.13kg

Water filters and purifiers can remove pathogens and sometimes chemicals from fresh water, but they can’t make drinkable water from seawater. This compact, hand-powered emergency desalinator can.

Uses the same reverse osmosis membrane as those in shipboard desalinators. A patented Energy Recovery System takes advantage of stored energy in the high-pressure reject water that is typically wasted. The pressurized reject water is recirculated to the back side of the piston to aid the next stroke, resulting in less work to achieve fresh water.

This unit is designed to be as light and compact as possible. Its nominal 30oz (890ml) per hour output is intended for survival situations only. For routine use, select a large, high-capacity desalinator.

Salt rejection is 98.4% on average (95.3% min).
Average pump rate is 40 strokes/minute.
Flow is 0.89 litres per hour +/- 15%.
Dimensions are 12.7 x 20.3 x 6.4 c

No. 9     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 5, 2011 at 11:42 PM     
Personally I prefer the Katadyn filters. But then again it is one of few such filters I am most familiar with. In the aviation crash survival training I have had those are the recommended filters and have been as far back as I can recall ever being aware of such filters.

Otherwise, at least having some purification tablets on hand was recommended.
No. 10     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  renee829369   Gender: F   Age: 79   on  May 6, 2011 at 6:12 AM     
Where is the est place to buy buckets with seals, for wheat, rice corn,etc.?
No. 11     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 6, 2011 at 2:08 PM     
obadiah wrote:

MEC does not have a berkley.
this one seems popular. it is swiss.
Katadyn Pocket Water Filter 300 dollars

Weight: 550g

This workhorse filter for extended travel or expedition use (proven over decades) is now improved with a round pump handle with a shock absorber for easier and more comfortable pumping, and a screw-on outlet hose which makes directing filtered water into bottles and bags much easier. Silver impregnation minimizes internal bacterial growth.

Filters up to 1L / minute.
The 0.2 micron ceramic filter is effective against all protozoa, and most bacteria (including smaller ones such as Campylobacter).
Nominal filter element life of 50,000L.







Obadiah, that is actually the one I wanted to get, and it is top of the line. There are other Katydn filters but this one is a good choice for longevity. If things go bad, you want something that will last without needing replacements as long as possible.

I bought one of these for my brother 8 months ago for around $220 and recently went to purchase one for myself and was shocked to find the price had spiked to $300 and more! I know that inflation is hiking things up but that seemed a little extreme so I went back to Berkey and ordered the 'GO' Berkey...




I still intend to get the Katydn Pocket filter, but there are a lot of financial demands for my money at the moment and that will have to wait.
No. 12     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 6, 2011 at 5:25 PM     
renee829369 wrote:

Where is the est place to buy buckets with seals, for wheat, rice corn,etc.?


Renee, you can probably find a good answer on survivalblog.com
No. 13     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Luke547   Gender: M   Age: 51   on  May 6, 2011 at 8:04 PM     
renee829369 wrote:

Where is the est place to buy buckets with seals, for wheat, rice corn,etc.?


http://beprepared.com/category.asp_Q_c_E_440_A_c2c_E_ln_A_name_E_FoodStorageContainers
No. 14     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  StarrElement   Gender: F   Age: 54   on  May 7, 2011 at 9:46 AM     
.
No. 15     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Luke547   Gender: M   Age: 51   on  May 7, 2011 at 2:38 PM     
StarrElement wrote:

much easier place to find . . . easy: "Tractor Supply"; and

they will have the buckets, then you buy the lids with seals separately from a health food store IF they don't have them. I have a bunch of the buckets I bought for 2.99 - 3.99 but the lids are a different story - I paid anywhere from $6.00 to $9.00 for the lids.


They may not be food grade.

There IS a difference.

Make sure they are food grade before placing food into them.

Otherwise you may find the petroleum and other chemicals the bucket is made out of can leach into the food and give it a nasty taste. As well as possibly be harmful.

Turn the bucket over and look for a stamp emblazoned into the bucket that says, "HDPE".

And to complicate matters further...not all HDPE buckets are food grade! :shock:
No. 16     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  joyful   Gender: F   Age: 55   on  May 9, 2011 at 10:57 PM     
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpbiuKTtMZo&feature=related
Maybe this has been psted befor, but I had never seen it.

What the govenment isn't telling you about global warming.

No. 17     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 10, 2011 at 4:03 PM     
joyful wrote:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpbiuKTtMZo&feature=related
Maybe this has been psted befor, but I had never seen it.

What the govenment isn't telling you about global warming.



Ok, I listened to this, and it was interesting, but WHERE WAS GEAR MENTIONED? Lol!
No. 18     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 10, 2011 at 5:36 PM     
Renee, some of the commercial survival sites selling food-grade buckets are rather expensive, but my understanding is that you can get food grade buckets (used) from bakeries and the like for FREE after they are finished with them.

It should be noted that MYLAR bags (in the buckets) are also recommended by some.
No. 19     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 11, 2011 at 3:17 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Renee, some of the commercial survival sites selling food-grade buckets are rather expensive, but my understanding is that you can get food grade buckets (used) from bakeries and the like for FREE after they are finished with them.

It should be noted that MYLAR bags (in the buckets) are also recommended by some.



A lot of fast food places give them away. At least they used to. I have not checked in a while.
No. 20     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 13, 2011 at 4:35 PM     
Well, here goes. At the risk of being classified as a "wacko", like Storm indicated his family considers him, I am a founding member of a survival/disaster/preparedness organization. Maybe some consider me a "wacko" regardless.

Although I expect and may wish for the best, I also attempt to be prepared for the worst. Just maybe not in a very outward or openly noticeable way.

Not sure when the interest began. Seems to be a natural extension of my almost lifelong interest in martial arts, flying, and Christianity. All involve preparation for survival.

Some where over the years it may have seemed to lose priority, but resurfaced with priority when I realized I did not want to have to look into the eyes of my loved ones and apologize for knowing better, but not doing anything to prepare.
No. 21     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 13, 2011 at 11:28 PM     
In my opinion a book or guide can be considered as survival gear;

For those looking to get into buying gold and/or silver (I would recommend silver over gold for several reasons but to each their own) probably the best book out there on this topic is "Rich Dad's Advisors: Guide to Investing In Gold and Silver: Protect Your Financial Future" by Michael Maloney.
No. 22     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 51   on  May 13, 2011 at 11:35 PM     
Silver prices have recently Took A Dump though but maybe it's time to get back in.
No. 23     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 13, 2011 at 11:45 PM     
insular926 wrote:

Silver prices have recently Took A Dump though but maybe it's time to get back in.



There is probably going to come a time even before this year is out that many may not have such an affordable opportunity to get into silver again in the foreseeable future such as there is now.
No. 24     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 14, 2011 at 12:05 AM     
Darrell wrote:

insular926 wrote:

Silver prices have recently Took A Dump though but maybe it's time to get back in.



There is probably going to come a time even before this year is out that many may not have such an affordable opportunity to get into silver again in the foreseeable future such as there is now.


Exactly, it is not a "dump" but rather a "dip", and you buy on the dips.
No. 25     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 15, 2011 at 9:03 PM     
I checked out new tents today. I once owned a very nice Eureka. But gave it away as one less thing to move when moving. Found myself today again favoring Eurekas. But they now cost way less than when I purchased mine. Retail price is like 50% less.
No. 26     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 51   on  May 15, 2011 at 9:09 PM     
Aldi has one in their stores right now and it's cheap but it looks fairly decent.
No. 27     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 15, 2011 at 9:34 PM     
Though I primarily use my Teardrop camper now, I still love tent camping and took my CABIN CREEK tent to Wyoming with me last summer, which was very handy when my car and teardrop bogged down for 3 days in a very bad rainstorm. Plus I left the teardrop at the ranch and went tent camping in the Big Horn mountains. I have a pic of that tent in the mountains but it seems to be missing. Here is the tent at the ranch in Wyoming I was at -




I LOVE this tent. It comes in two sizes and I have the smaller one. It is wearing out and I won't HESITATE to buy another one when the time comes. What really makes it is the fly, without it it is just a normal tent. The fly doubles the size, gives you a 'front porch' (sort of), and vestibules. It is also very resistant to winds.

It is a Camp Trails CABIN CREEK tent.
No. 28     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  joyful   Gender: F   Age: 55   on  May 15, 2011 at 10:39 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

joyful wrote:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpbiuKTtMZo&feature=related
Maybe this has been psted befor, but I had never seen it.

What the govenment isn't telling you about global warming.



Ok, I listened to this, and it was interesting, but WHERE WAS GEAR MENTIONED? Lol!


In my first post, I said that 'gear' wasn't mentioned until the 8th or 9th episode, I forget, but...my response was TIMED OUT... so I just posted a quick one.

After watching the 12 episodes, I have had more to think about. But as you said in your Argentina post, this is not just y2k coming at us. (I did not even fill one bottle of water or ANYTHING in preparation for y2k!)

Seeking God's wisdom is going to be the most important thing in the coming days.


...Old worlds die and new be born...

No. 29     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 16, 2011 at 1:39 PM     
Look for my new, part 2, Argentinian thread next week, joyful. It should be very interesting and enlightening.
No. 30     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 39   on  May 16, 2011 at 2:23 PM     

I'm surprised nobody mentioned TP. lol Probably one of the most overlooked items!

:laugh:
No. 31     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 16, 2011 at 4:37 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:


I'm surprised nobody mentioned TP. lol Probably one of the most overlooked items!

:laugh:


The thread is hardly over, Gent. And for TP, my place is 'full' of it, :tongue:

(and still the wider tissues before inflation cut the width on some brands)
No. 32     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 39   on  May 16, 2011 at 11:19 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Christian_Gent wrote:


I'm surprised nobody mentioned TP. lol Probably one of the most overlooked items!

:laugh:


The thread is hardly over, Gent. And for TP, my place is 'full' of it, :tongue:

(and still the wider tissues before inflation cut the width on some brands)


How much "width" do ya need, Storm? lol

:laugh:
No. 33     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  May 17, 2011 at 3:54 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

Christian_Gent wrote:


I'm surprised nobody mentioned TP. lol Probably one of the most overlooked items!

:laugh:


The thread is hardly over, Gent. And for TP, my place is 'full' of it, :tongue:

(and still the wider tissues before inflation cut the width on some brands)


How much "width" do ya need, Storm? lol

:laugh:


Veeeeery funnnnnny! :tongue:
No. 34     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 27, 2011 at 12:16 PM     
My most recent addition is a portable powerpack. I am now researching a solar panel to add with it which will result in having my own solar generator.

I am also in the process of building a library of eBooks. These can be stored on my Kindle or Nook and thus be a quick and handy reference when in the midst of a survival situation. Just ordered a new wilderness survival eBook.

I need to take some time to seriously inventory just what all gear I do have.

I have firearms and ammo, a bow, knives, camping gear, compact first aid kits, a bugout bag/pack, a backpackable stove, lanterns, etc...
No. 35     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 27, 2011 at 6:53 PM     
Purchased a video on survival information moments ago.
No. 36     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  YHVH   Gender: M   Age: 28   on  Aug 27, 2011 at 6:55 PM     
this is an awesome thread. I was just telling my dad the other day that people in today's age, should know what was basic to those before our time. Never know when it will be needed. Not saying that I don't trust Abba for His provision and protection, but still think these "survival" skills should be basic knowledge for everyone---esp. Americans.
No. 37     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 27, 2011 at 6:58 PM     
This is exactly what my solar generator setup is:

Darrell wrote:

Brad - I learned today that a 12 volt 30 watt 2.5 amp solar panel will fully charge the powerpack in about 10 hours. I did find that kind of odd being it can take up to 35 hours to fully charge the thing from an AC outlet. And it can be almost fully charged in about 4 hours from an auto 12 volt outlet.

This was not my first choice for a portable powerpack, but the price was right and it will do for my "playing around" with a solar panel.

The thing is kind of cool. Has a built in light that can operate up to 50 hours when the unit is fully charged. Has a built in AM/FM radio. 3 3-prong AC outlets. A set of detachable cables for jump starting a car.

This is it. Weighs just a little over 30 pounds and has a small footprint. About 13" long, 9" wide, and 12" high. Obviously not going to get me totally off the grid but will do in a pinch:




And a picture with a folding solar panel. In bright sunlight, that little panel will fully charge the powerpack in about 10 hours:

No. 38     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 27, 2011 at 7:00 PM     
I am looking at getting one of these or something similar:

Darrell wrote:

Stove In a Can

http://www.solutionsfromscience.com/?p=1819&utm_source=OTG_Advertorial_SIACan_August16_Text2&utm_medium=OTG_Advertorial_SIACan_August16_Text2&utm_term=OTG_Advertorial_SIACan_August16_Text2&utm_content=OTG_Advertorial_SIACan_August16_Text2&utm_campaign=OTG_Advertorial_SIACan_August16_Text2
No. 39     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 27, 2011 at 7:17 PM     
I used my little powerpack today to power a guitar amp. That was pretty cool. Not sure how long it would have lasted. I only played for a few minutes and had the amp set to "low output".
No. 40     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 28, 2011 at 8:29 PM     
Ordered the packable folding solar panel today. Folds down to the size of slightly larger than a DVD case.

With what is going on right now with the hurricane the price of a premium 12 watt folding panel has been pushed to $300-$400. Thought I had better snag my 26 watt panel while I could still get it for under $250.

I still plan to buy a framed 30 watt panel later to experiment with, but the folding panel kills two birds with one stone for me. Provides something to experiment with for charging the powerpack and convenient to use for several other portable purposes and projects I have in mind.

Today I learned there may be a market out there for simply making the custom connectors and/or adaptors to couple the variety of panels and powerpacks together. I have not had my hands directly on enough yet to determine if I can custom make some kind of adaptor that would cover a variety of needs with just one or two connectors.

LOL. This entire project has been kind of like "deja vu" or coming full circle. I started college in 1972 with one of my two declared majors at the time being "environmental science".
No. 41     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 28, 2011 at 10:48 PM     
Just ordered a new book titled SAS Survival Guide.
No. 42     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Angelfish   Gender: F   Age: 32   on  Aug 29, 2011 at 1:55 PM     
I am very interested in the sun ovens. http://www.sunoven.com/
I had seen one when I was in Pahrumph, Nevada. The man who showed it to me couldn't stop talking about it. I think the biggest thing he cooked in it was a whole chicken. I wouldn't want to go hiking with it, but not bad if you're staying home or tossing it in the back of a vehicle.

I think it's also good to take up additional activities that might help you out in tough situations. I'm going rapalling for the first time in November. Also I started snow skiing last season so I think that would come in handy in certain situations. You can also hunt on skiis.

No. 43     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Aug 29, 2011 at 2:03 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Just ordered a new book titled SAS Survival Guide.


Seen that in the store, Darrell. Looks interesting.
No. 44     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 29, 2011 at 5:03 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Darrell wrote:

Just ordered a new book titled SAS Survival Guide.


Seen that in the store, Darrell. Looks interesting.



Walmart online has them marked down to under $5.00. And this is the new edition. I have seen the old edition marked down before, but not the new one until yesterday.
No. 45     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 29, 2011 at 5:07 PM     
Angelfish wrote:

I am very interested in the sun ovens. http://www.sunoven.com/
I had seen one when I was in Pahrumph, Nevada. The man who showed it to me couldn't stop talking about it. I think the biggest thing he cooked in it was a whole chicken. I wouldn't want to go hiking with it, but not bad if you're staying home or tossing it in the back of a vehicle.




This oven for sure is a nice looking one, but I have seen home built ones costing much less do the job.
No. 46     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 29, 2011 at 5:18 PM     
Angelfish wrote:

I am very interested in the sun ovens. http://www.sunoven.com/



These ovens are pretty cool.

BTW - You can snag the exact same oven on eBay brand new for considerably less than the retail price quoted on the Sunoven site.
No. 47     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Angelfish   Gender: F   Age: 32   on  Aug 30, 2011 at 1:22 PM     
I'm very tempted by the sun oven price. Thank you Darrell.

As for Mountain House I think my favorite food is the lasagna with beef too, Storm. I think it's so neat that all you need to do it boil water and pour it in. You've got food! It's not as high in sodium as what I was fearing either.
No. 48     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Aug 30, 2011 at 2:50 PM     
Angelfish wrote:

I'm very tempted by the sun oven price. Thank you Darrell.

As for Mountain House I think my favorite food is the lasagna with beef too, Storm. I think it's so neat that all you need to do it boil water and pour it in. You've got food! It's not as high in sodium as what I was fearing either.


Plus they are good for YEARS! I bought a couple the other day with the pull date of 2018 but in reality these are reported good for up to 25 yrs. or more.
No. 49     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Aug 30, 2011 at 4:16 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Personally I prefer the Katadyn filters. But then again it is one of few such filters I am most familiar with. In the aviation crash survival training I have had those are the recommended filters and have been as far back as I can recall ever being aware of such filters.

Otherwise, at least having some purification tablets on hand was recommended.


As I've mentioned somewhere, my top choice would be the Katadyn Pocket Filter, but gravity filters like the Berkys have their uses also. For a backpack out in the wilds a Katadyn is perfect, but for an in-house situation the gravity feed Berky is more user friendly. Kind of depends on what your needs are. I intend to end up with both.
No. 50     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 30, 2011 at 6:16 PM     
Angelfish wrote:

I'm very tempted by the sun oven price. Thank you Darrell.




There is a used one listed for $100. But I have seen brand new low cost solar ovens, definitely not of the caliber as this sun oven but they work, selling for less than $20 on eBay.
No. 51     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 30, 2011 at 7:57 PM     
The folding solar panel arrived today. Sun was down before I opened this particular box and realized what it was. Turns out I do not have to build a custom cable/connector for this particular panel unless I desire to place the panel further from the powerpack. The panel included a cable with a multi connection adaptor that will plug into a variety of sockets for charging purposes. Not sure when they started including this. The description I had read previous to ordering stated a connector would have to be customized to connect to my powerpack.

Panel open is 27.5" x 37.5" :




Panel folds down to 11" x 8.5" x 1" inches and weighs 28 ounces:

No. 52     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 31, 2011 at 5:42 PM     
Today was a very overcast day but I tried the folding panel anyway. My powerpack within seconds indicated it was charging despite no bright sunlight at all.

I really like the folding panel, but still plan to purchase a framed one for experimentation.

At this point I may have a package listed on the Internet by this weekend attempting to market the things as a premium package with the folding panel and a standard package with the framed panel.

I am also in the middle of authoring an eBook on putting your own solar generator together. It is easy with off the shelf items, but most folks seem to want such an item packaged together with easy directions on how to use it.

Documentation with the solar is sparse and not very informative. The manual with the powerpack is very informative. But neither provides real good information about pairing them together as a solar generator. Basically the two items are the heart of any such system. Depending on the panel purchased and/or the power pack, an inverter and charge controller may be required along with custom building a cable/connector or two. But I lucked out with the choice of my components. The inverter and controller are built into the power pack; the correct cable/connector included with the panel, thus all has simply been "plug and play" with this combination.
No. 53     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 31, 2011 at 7:48 PM     
Angelfish wrote:

I'm very tempted by the sun oven price. Thank you Darrell.




Have you seen the combo solar ovens? They cook solar only, electric only, or you can use electric and solar together.

It caught my eye being I could possibly power it with my solar generator if need be.
No. 54     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Aug 31, 2011 at 9:12 PM     
Done enough testing this evening to learn my panel and powerpack function great together as a solar generator. I went live online with an ad for my premium package this evening.
No. 55     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 1, 2011 at 6:08 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Done enough testing this evening to learn my panel and powerpack function great together as a solar generator. I went live online with an ad for my premium package this evening.



Only 27 hits in 12 hours but my ad can already be found in the top 10 via a search on Google.
No. 56     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 2, 2011 at 9:05 AM     
Lots of hits, no buyers. But if nothing else hopefully the ad gets my other offerings looked at on living independent and self-sustaining.
No. 57     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Sep 2, 2011 at 12:14 PM     
What medium are you using for advertising?
No. 58     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 2, 2011 at 2:18 PM     
For the most part eBay ads. That is the medium that has worked best for me. Otherwise it is links included with emailed messages and receipts to current customers.

I forgot it is a Holiday weekend. Little to nothing seems to sell online on such weekends. This is a 4 day weekend for me but has not seemed like it with a niece having a wedding this weekend.
No. 59     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 51   on  Sep 2, 2011 at 2:59 PM     
I wonder if a person bought two of the solar panels and hooked them up in parallel if it would charge the battery pack twice as fast?
No. 60     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 2, 2011 at 3:26 PM     
insular926 wrote:

I wonder if a person bought two of the solar panels and hooked them up in parallel if it would charge the battery pack twice as fast?



Panels can be coupled together to increase output but the desired end outcome is sometimes not what one would think. The issue then becomes exceeding the amperage requirements of the device you are attempting to charge. For such reasons many use a controller between the panel and the device being charged to regulate the amperage. My powerpack has the controller built in. No matter how many panels I couple together, the built in controller limits the incoming amperage to 2.5 amps maximum. My one panel by itself can produce that much amperage. A panel in the 30 watt neighborhood will produce 2.5 amps.

My research indicates that many of the panels will exceed their rated wattage in very bright sunlight.
No. 61     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 2, 2011 at 10:07 PM     
Angelfish wrote:

I am very interested in the sun ovens. http://www.sunoven.com/




There is a used global sun oven on eBay right now with the auction currently being won at $5.00. I am sure it will sell for much more, but on Holiday weekends were traffic seems slow on such sites, I have seen some things sell for ridiculously low prices such as on Qui Bid.

Have you seen the solar bread baking tubes? Some are quite costly but interesting.
No. 62     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 3, 2011 at 10:31 PM     
I have been selling firearms publications online I think since last year, but other than those books I sold my first "survival" type item today after posting the ad less than 12 hours ago. Sold a book on preserving and canning.
No. 63     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  SouthernLady614   Gender: F   Age: 45   on  Sep 4, 2011 at 12:07 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

I haven't tried those yet, though I'm sure they're good if Jeff, 'The Berky Guy', sells them.

Personally, since I am single I don't need to buy in large lots, so I go to Wallyworld and get the Mountain House freeze-dried meals, which last for many years. I specifically like the Beef Stroganoff and the Lasagne.


You can actually find the MH meals at Wallyworld? Where? In the camping section? I found them in essentials.com, but wow! Expensive. To me, anyway.

BTW, I'm bookmarking the links as I go through this thread. I have a bookmark page called, "Homesteading" for my prepper/survival threads and links.
No. 64     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Sep 4, 2011 at 12:12 AM     
SouthernLady614 wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

I haven't tried those yet, though I'm sure they're good if Jeff, 'The Berky Guy', sells them.

Personally, since I am single I don't need to buy in large lots, so I go to Wallyworld and get the Mountain House freeze-dried meals, which last for many years. I specifically like the Beef Stroganoff and the Lasagne.


You can actually find the MH meals at Wallyworld? Where? In the camping section? I found them in essentials.com, but wow! Expensive. To me, anyway.

BTW, I'm bookmarking the links as I go through this thread. I have a bookmark page called, "Homesteading" for my prepper/survival threads and links.


Yes, camping section, and still $4.88 (some of them). Been expecting the price to rise but its been hanging in there. I like the lasagne (what else? lol) and beef stroganoff.
No. 65     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  SouthernLady614   Gender: F   Age: 45   on  Sep 4, 2011 at 12:22 AM     
Maybe when my money starts flowing again, it's time to take a stroll over to the camping section. Here in ND, they might clearance some of it to get it out of the way for Christmas, but I kinda' doubt it.

Hubby brought me a bucket of pinto beans home. They are in a beet seed bucket wrapped in a huge opaque garbage bag. I think I'm going to check with the hamburger restaurants and see if they have pickle jars or big pickle buckets with lids for my storage containers.
No. 66     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Angelfish   Gender: F   Age: 32   on  Sep 4, 2011 at 12:37 AM     
Bread growing in solar tubes? Now that sounds interesting.
No. 67     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 51   on  Sep 4, 2011 at 12:44 AM     
Angelfish wrote:

Bread growing in solar tubes? Now that sounds interesting.
Yes, I agree!

I've also often thought about these bicyclist's that ride halfway across the United States, why doesn't someone come up with a small solar panel that would clamp right on top of the headlight where you could have it hooked directly into the rechargeable batteries during your daytime riding and then it could be removed during the night for when you need it?

granted it would have to be a pretty small solar cell but if it's charging nearly all day then I think it could work.
No. 68     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 5, 2011 at 8:00 AM     
Have yet to sell a solar generator, but my offerings of other survival type items have started selling within hours of the ads being posted. There is obviously a serious market out there for such items.

BTW - I forgot to share that last Christmas I added a handheld GPS to my personal equipment/gear.
No. 69     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 5, 2011 at 8:20 AM     
Provident living means focusing on basic necessities and practicalities while acquiring the skills necessary to be self-reliant in times of personal or widespread emergency.
No. 70     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Sep 5, 2011 at 1:20 PM     
By: Stormchaser
What medium are you using for advertising?

No. 58 Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear
By: * Darrell
For the most part eBay ads. That is the medium that has worked best for me.


And that would be a 'Duh' from me. Of course you use ebay - we all know that and the Storm-mind must have went into a meltdown. I had just seen a webinar about video marketing strategies and that prompted my question, without me even thinking about your ebay thread.

Duh.
No. 71     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 5, 2011 at 5:54 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

By: Stormchaser
What medium are you using for advertising?

No. 58 Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear
By: * Darrell
For the most part eBay ads. That is the medium that has worked best for me.


And that would be a 'Duh' from me. Of course you use ebay - we all know that and the Storm-mind must have went into a meltdown. I had just seen a webinar about video marketing strategies and that prompted my question, without me even thinking about your ebay thread.

Duh.



Plans are in place for rolling out at least 3-5 new individual websites specializing in specific product lines. Domain names have been purchased. Such as a site just for eBooks, a site just for DVDs, a site for survival items, etc. And will send Amazon and eBay customers to those sites for repeat business were as much of my business now is from previous buyers, referral, or the result of checking out my ad for one thing but buying something else I have to offer. Also most sales have finally migrated to be digital information type products or at least items I can drop ship.

Moving ahead with plans to incorporate. All is pretty much decided. Need an evening to sit down with my daughter to go over some things with her. She will play some kind of role if nothing more than an heir. Once the corporation is established I will roll out the websites doing business as under the corporate name and re-establish accounts with all current product sources under the corporate name. Hope to have all in place by the end of September. And then add more affiliate type business and partner ventures. Have already did the check on possible corporate names and all are available. Although each of my current ventures already has their own DBA names, all will be put under 1 current corporate umbrella except for my professional licensed activities such as real estate and appraising.

Preparing for winding down from my current role as an employee. Which I thought I was doing a couple years back but things just seem to keep getting "busier" or more fulfilling. Depends on how one looks at it.
No. 72     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 5, 2011 at 6:07 PM     
This weekend I ordered a Folding Solar LED Lantern.

No. 73     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 5, 2011 at 6:27 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

By: Stormchaser
What medium are you using for advertising?

No. 58 Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear
By: * Darrell
For the most part eBay ads. That is the medium that has worked best for me.


And that would be a 'Duh' from me. Of course you use ebay - we all know that and the Storm-mind must have went into a meltdown. I had just seen a webinar about video marketing strategies and that prompted my question, without me even thinking about your ebay thread.

Duh.



Wow! I was just on ChristianMingle.com and clicked on an ad on their home page for solar energy. Next a list of like 10 ads popped up for solar energy items with my ad being one of them. They must have some kind of ad link arrangement that "pulled" my ad.
No. 74     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 6, 2011 at 6:29 PM     
I have been using the solar generator almost daily to keep some low watt lighting on in the evening, netbook charged, phones and games charged, etc. May as well get some free electricity out of it. Works great. And I simply leave the solar panel inside in front of a window and it keeps the powerpack easily charged even on overcast days. The window faces west. Would probably perform even better if I left it out on the deck were as it would be prone to getting sunlight from the sides also, but I am away from home most all day the first half of the week and it is doing fine inside simply laid out in front of a window.

I will probably order a framed solar panel later this week for further experimentation.
No. 75     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 6, 2011 at 6:32 PM     
Today I purchased a small Coleman solar oven. I could not build a decent looking small oven for as little as this thing cost. If it works out with any success at all, I will most likely buy one of the larger solar ovens.
No. 76     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Sep 6, 2011 at 7:36 PM     
We have found Coleman products have really been deluted over the years from the high quality they were once regarded. I rarely buy Coleman now and if I do, it is something that is simple and not having anything that can break down.
No. 77     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 7, 2011 at 5:30 PM     
I have a lot of old Coleman brand equipment that still works great and looks like new. Until this solar oven it had been a while since I have purchased a Coleman brand anything. I checked out several low cost solar ovens and found more than one for at least $10 less but looked like someone made it at home. Found one $10 more that looked like someone made it at home. Turns out the distributor does make them on their kitchen table.

One of the last tents I checked out sported the Coleman brand name and I was quite impressed with it.
No. 78     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Sep 7, 2011 at 7:11 PM     
Not saying everything with the Coleman brand is junk, Darrell, only I've learned to be circumspect about them. Just bought a Coleman product myself in the last month, so its not about throwing them out of the mix.
No. 79     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 8, 2011 at 4:59 AM     
The price on solar panels is like the stock market.

I purchased my Bruton for like $229. The lowest price I can find this AM is $340. But I have seen these also go for as high as $500.
No. 80     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 8, 2011 at 5:02 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Not saying everything with the Coleman brand is junk, Darrell, only I've learned to be circumspect about them. Just bought a Coleman product myself in the last month, so its not about throwing them out of the mix.



I understand. That is why I mentioned my Coleman stuff is old. Very old for that matter, some probably purchased in the late 70s, until my recent purchase.
No. 81     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  outdoorman93   Gender: M   Age: 56   on  Sep 8, 2011 at 8:36 AM     
WWW.USAPREPARES.COM

expo tomorrow fri,sat in Springfild ,Mo.
No. 82     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Ribseeker   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 8, 2011 at 2:03 PM     
Something that may interest some of you.

http://www.hypersolar.com/news.php
No. 83     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 8, 2011 at 7:48 PM     
BTW - I got my Coleman solar oven brand new for $29 were as the best price I have seen elsewhere on the Coleman is over $60.
No. 84     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 8, 2011 at 8:01 PM     
Ribseeker wrote:

Something that may interest some of you.

http://www.hypersolar.com/news.php



Thank you. I find this kind of "stuff" very interesting. My research indicates that high-performance CIGS (copper indium gallium diselende) is the most efficient thin-film solar cell technology available.

My folding panel is CIGS. Or I should say the folding panel I used to have. Shipped it to a buyer today. They sold quickly and the price jumped so high I did not pass up the opporunity to sell the one I had kept for myself. Just since this AM they are now running well over $500 on up to $799 from many distributors. It was hardly a week ago you could easily purchase them for under $250.

As a replacement for myself, I am currently winning an auction for $180 on a used 2 year old one that will suit my experimentation needs.
No. 85     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 8, 2011 at 8:40 PM     
You can actually get a lot of solar panels for free. Many that got caught up in the hype some years back now have old technology panels on their homes and are often willing to give them away or may even pay you to remove them from their roofs, etc. For some these old panels meet their needs and they are happy to get them.

Steve Harris, the guy that produced the "Bread from Gasoline" video, obtains many old solar panels for free here in Michigan.
No. 86     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 10, 2011 at 6:21 PM     
I calculated today I can build my own solar panels for less than $1 per watt not taking into account my time.
No. 87     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jeanie95   Gender: F   Age: 60   on  Sep 10, 2011 at 6:53 PM     
Storm, I think I might need some of that survival/disaster gear after all..To get through some of these wars here... have a blessed day!
No. 88     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Sep 10, 2011 at 7:08 PM     
Jeanie95 wrote:

Storm, I think I might need some of that survival/disaster gear after all..To get through some of these wars here... have a blessed day!


Not too much survival gear available to counter skunks, methinks.
No. 89     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 13, 2011 at 4:41 PM     
I won the auction on the folding solar panel and ordered two more. All 3 panels can easily be linked together to increase the wattage. I may have to invest in or build a controller to keep from supplying too much current to some devices. Building a controller looks easier than electronic devices I have already built.

Have been using the panel independently from the powerpack to charge cell phones, etc. Works great. Been taking the powerpack along to outings for portable AC power. I plug her back into the panel when I leave for work. By the time I get home she is fully charged again even on overcast days.

Doing some more research I encountered another interesting off the shelf solar panel package. Runs about $400 so I am not in the mood to run right out and buy another panel right this moment. But it is on my list.

Completed an online course yesterday evening on building your own panels. Very interesting and I gained a lot of insight on the technology, but I simply do not have the time right now. Presents an interesting and easy retirement income opportunity for maybe down the road.

Also picked up a couple more survival theme books.
No. 90     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 14, 2011 at 8:59 PM     
Female acquaintances are telling me I simply have too much time on my hands to be messing with this "survival" and getting off the grid" type stuff.

The ironic thing is that the last 3 solar panels I purchased were from a female. She said they enabled her to stay on the beach with no hard wired electricty.
No. 91     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 14, 2011 at 9:30 PM     
Purchased an Energizer Carabiner LED Area Tent Light today.

No. 92     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 15, 2011 at 8:05 PM     
It would not be a foldable, but I priced the material required to build my own 30 watt panel today and I can build it for less than $12 not including the wiring to connect to a device or powerpack.
No. 93     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 17, 2011 at 8:11 AM     
Darrell wrote:

Doing some more research I encountered another interesting off the shelf solar panel package. Runs about $400 so I am not in the mood to run right out and buy another panel right this moment. But it is on my list.




Even though I did not run out and purchase this system for personal use, as of yersterday I am now a reseller of this brand and their line of other solar products.
No. 94     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 18, 2011 at 3:19 PM     
My Coleman solar oven finally arrived. It is of obvious higher quality than anything else I looked at in the price range. The others appeared to be of very poor construction. I have also noticed just within the past month the price has increased in this price range as much as $40 over what they were when I placed my order. Some say it is due to the recent natural disasters while others day it those preparing for 2012.
No. 95     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 20, 2011 at 5:32 PM     
I now have 3 solar panels and 3 powerpacks that charge to full capacity via the solar panels.
No. 96     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 23, 2011 at 5:07 PM     
Finally. Today someone purchased a complete solar generator package from me rather than wanting just the solar panel or some other accessory.
No. 97     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 24, 2011 at 7:02 PM     
I purchased an 80 watt high efficiency framed panel today and a Sharp module controller. At the moment I am working on making one room of my home completely powered by solar energy (solar generated electricity for the lighting and all electrical devices used in the room) and hope to expand from there.

Heating seems to be my biggest drawback preventing me from going completely solar powered. This week I checked out free standing electric heaters, but my current electrical storage capacity is limited on how long it could keep one operating. I would not have heat for very long if relying on totally solar generated electricity.

May be easier too simply move south.
No. 98     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 51   on  Sep 25, 2011 at 5:45 AM     
I own a stock which is somewhat into Solar Panels, it's AETI.
No. 99     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Sep 25, 2011 at 10:45 PM     
I sold 2 more solar panels today but so far only the one complete solar generator package. Seems most are interested in a lower cost generator package with a framed panel or a more costly generator package with a higher wattage panel and powerpack. At this time I cannot offer either without custom building the cables required to mate the panel to the powerpack. I just do not have the time. The folding panel includes a readymade cable that makes the appropriate connection.

A higher wattage solar panel is in transit to me. As soon as it gets here I can determine what it will take cable wise to mate to a higher wattage powerpack and then offer a larger system.
No. 100     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Oct 6, 2011 at 8:39 PM     
My 80 watt panel finally arrived. Been too busy to experiment with it. I did order a 30 amp / 500 watt controller for it. This panel provides much more output than my 26 watt panels and I do not want to chance "frying" something valuable being charged.
No. 101     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Oct 6, 2011 at 8:50 PM     
Related to survival, getting Lasik done was actually on my list of survival preparedness items/tasks to get done. Was not a priority on the forefront, but it always weighed in the back of mind my what if I got into a survival or self-defense situation and lost a contact or both and/or had no eyeglasses available.

Now I ponder if I lose the far vision eye could I adequately get by with only the near vision eye. LOL.

Actually I have found I can see well enough to drive with only my near vision eye. Maybe not at high speeds and I would not want to have to fly a plane with using only my near vision eye. The doctor said once I am beyond the healing phase and vision stabilizes, they can provide me a couple contacts for the near vision eye as back-up for the occasions I may desire optimum distance vision in both eyes.
No. 102     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Oct 6, 2011 at 10:57 PM     
insular926 wrote:

Simply incredible! a whopping 25 year shelf life food, nitrogen packed, Thanks Storm!

http://directive21.com/wisefoodstorage.html


Tried Wise Food storage last week, and it was ok. Wasn't too impressed with the taste nor selection. In other words, WF only has non-meat entrees with little else to add calories like packs of veggies or meats. Now if someone isn't used to eating without any meat, try it for a week. Now imagine 30 days, 3 months, a year?! They said that they're going to have a meat menu by November so that'll be interesting.

No. 103     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Oct 6, 2011 at 11:04 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Renee, some of the commercial survival sites selling food-grade buckets are rather expensive, but my understanding is that you can get food grade buckets (used) from bakeries and the like for FREE after they are finished with them.

It should be noted that MYLAR bags (in the buckets) are also recommended by some.


The problem with this is that it's somewhat porous enough to allow condensation and a tad or air, unlike metal cans. Secondly, most seal cans or mylar bags with nitrogen which is what extends shelf-life. Thirdly, they also add oxygen-absorbing packets inside to soak up every bit of oxygen left.

Been doing lots of heavy reading on food storage to understand what works, why, and how long. The biggest thing however, is that it really needs to be kept in a cool location like a basement. Shelf-life diminishes greatly if kept in garages or attics.

No. 104     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Oct 6, 2011 at 11:06 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Christian_Gent wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

The thread is hardly over, Gent. And for TP, my place is 'full' of it, :tongue:

(and still the wider tissues before inflation cut the width on some brands)


How much "width" do ya need, Storm? lol

:laugh:


Veeeeery funnnnnny! :tongue:



Ya know, everytime I read this I crack up. lol


No. 105     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Oct 6, 2011 at 11:14 PM     
Ordered a 3-month shipment of long-term food storage which should be here next week. I'm actually going to try it repeatedly over the next 90 days as a replacement to supermarket foods (except fresh veggies). If all goes well (it should), I'll look into buying larger lots. Shelf-life of 20+ years.

Haven't found a food storage vendor that packages bread yet so I'm going to look into that. It looks like the grains (wheat) are packaged though, but not sure where to go after that. I'll look into that this weekend.

No. 106     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Oct 8, 2011 at 2:50 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

Christian_Gent wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

The thread is hardly over, Gent. And for TP, my place is 'full' of it, :tongue:

(and still the wider tissues before inflation cut the width on some brands)


How much "width" do ya need, Storm? lol

:laugh:


Veeeeery funnnnnny! :tongue:



Ya know, everytime I read this I crack up. lol




Ok FunnyMan, I have something for you - maybe YOU in particular can make a million bux! Go for it!


No. 107     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Oct 13, 2011 at 3:22 PM     

ROFL!! Too funny. Now I've seen the CRAZIEST MLM out there.

No. 108     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Oct 15, 2011 at 4:16 PM     
I happened to stumble across http://www.foodinsurance.com/?source=gbtv of which Glenn Beck appears to have some kind of relationship with.
No. 109     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Nov 12, 2011 at 4:17 PM     
Storm - What do you know about "The Survivors Club"? I have read good reviews and bad reviews. They seem to cover surviving situations experienced caused by a variety of ordeals. Not only disasters and economy, but such as surviving cancer and other medical conditions, domestic violence, and other ordeals.

Recently I have really gotten into listening to audio books. Yesterday for half price I purchased "The Survivors Club". Will start listening to it today

http://www.thesurvivorsclub.org/
No. 110     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Nov 12, 2011 at 5:46 PM     
Never heard of them but I'll check them out.

There is a Survival internet radio network -


http://prepperpodcast.com
No. 111     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Nov 12, 2011 at 5:49 PM     
Ok Darrell, your Survivors club seems to be a different sort of survivor, that from surviving from an abused family situation, or surviving from cancer, that sort of thing.
No. 112     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 51   on  Nov 12, 2011 at 6:27 PM     
No. 113     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Nov 12, 2011 at 6:43 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Ok Darrell, your Survivors club seems to be a different sort of survivor, that from surviving from an abused family situation, or surviving from cancer, that sort of thing.


I guess it's not a Men's support group for those who have been taken to the cleaners. lol

:duck:

No. 114     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  joyful   Gender: F   Age: 55   on  Nov 12, 2011 at 9:18 PM     
It looks like the grains (wheat) are packaged though, but not sure where to go after that.


The old timers would have had flour, or some kind of small grinder. Whe you add water and salt, you have dough. When you let it sit out in warm weather, it will gather yeast and then you have 'sourdough', like the 'sourdough' french bread you buy.

No. 115     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Nov 13, 2011 at 9:03 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Ok Darrell, your Survivors club seems to be a different sort of survivor, that from surviving from an abused family situation, or surviving from cancer, that sort of thing.



Started listening to the audio book yesterday. So far all the author has talked about is his first-hand experience at a Marine disaster survival school in CA. As a civilian he attended a program on surviving underwater disasters such as aircraft crashing into bodies of water, etc.

Reading between the lines at this point and to make a long story short, I think the author is laying the ground work to impress upon the reader that the mindset and mental preparation to survive any disaster situation is just as important as the physical, environment, equipment, and supply preparations made. Psychological impacts the physiological. You give up the will to live/survive then you do not survive and/or you die.

He has also touched a little on the mental and physical phenomenon that occurs to an individual when they realize they are really in a life and death situation same as discussed in firearms self-defense classes. Again emphasizing that prior mental preparation is just as important as physical and equipment preparation.

Most all when faced with a life and death situation experience a range of physiological changes including increased heart rate and cardiac output, higher blood pressure, accelerated respiration, greater carbohydrate metabolism, instantaneous supercharging of the body, all impacting fine motor skills, vision, and hearing. Often simply called the "fight or flight" reflexes experienced in a life threatening situation, these changes can aid your endeavor to survive by providing a heightened sense of awareness and perception were as you easily see "what is coming" and perform appropriately, or it may take the opposite direction with your state of mind horrifically shattered and you simply freeze saying to yourself "this can't be happening". Thus the importance of preparing prior to face such potential life and death situations. Your mental and physical reactions need to be honed into becoming as normal and routine as possible in aiding your efforts to survive.
No. 116     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 57   on  Nov 13, 2011 at 6:32 PM     
A thought provoking "tid bit" from "The Survivors Club" book; the reality is that 100% of us will eventually face at least one "life or death" situation other than dying a natural death.

Well, I have already well surpassed those odds to were as I should not have to be concerned the rest of my life.
No. 117     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Dec 27, 2011 at 10:34 AM     
Yesterday I picked up a quartz element infrared heater. I was in the market for an Eden Pure but settled for another brand called Life Smart that offers 1/3 more heating capacity than the Eden Pure model I was considering and at 1/2 the price. So far so good. If I close off the bedrooms and bathrooms she appears to be able to efficiently heat the main living area without my furnace ever kicking on to assist.

I was not really looking at this as a piece of survival gear, but one never knows. I plan to experiment with powering the thing with my solar panel and batteries, but without experimenting much I am sure it will drain the power from the batteries much faster than can I keep them charged by solar, thus making it an inefficient or unreliable manner to reasonably heat my home. But will be interesting to see what I can do.

LOL. Before I hit "Post Message" I looked over to see the little heater displaying an error code and it was not working. Turning it off and back on got her going again but I now cannot get it to function via the remote. Hopefully it is just a battery issue. I researched reviews on this model early this AM and found only 1 negative review. He stated within 24 hours of use he was getting an error code but still posted he was going to keep the thing. All other reviews on this brand were quite positive.
No. 118     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Dec 27, 2011 at 10:41 AM     
Strangely the remote has simply started functioning again after the heater reached the temp set point and turned itself off as it should without an error code. I will monitor and see what happens.

I purchased this at Menards of whom I am not a fan of but they were the only ones with this model in stock and at the lowest price. I have 90 days to return for a full refund. The unit also has a 5 year warranty of which Menards said I could return after 90 days and up to the 5 years for a replacement or in store credit, or contact the manufacturer for a replacement. I figured I could not beat that kind of warranty anywhere else.
No. 119     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Jan 28, 2012 at 10:45 AM     
Just today I stumbled onto that National Geographic channel hosts a documentary series about Preppers & Survivalists. Where have I been?

Although I am not an avid TV watcher for simply entertainment, not enough time, but I am often aware of such educational type programs.
No. 120     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Jan 28, 2012 at 11:37 AM     
That would have been a great show to watch. I wonder if it's accessible to watch via the Internet?

No. 121     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Jan 28, 2012 at 11:45 AM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

That would have been a great show to watch. I wonder if it's accessible to watch via the Internet?




I have not took the time to search diligently, but quickly via Google I encountered links to some of the previously aired sessions. But when I click on them all I get is a message that the video has been removed.
No. 122     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Fakey_Ego   Gender: F   Age: 33   on  Jan 28, 2012 at 3:46 PM     
Sorry I have not read the epic amount of posts to this thread, but I couldn't help but wonder who is prepared for the Zombie Apocalypse? I personally am.
No. 123     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Jan 28, 2012 at 4:07 PM     
Fakey_Ego wrote:

Sorry I have not read the epic amount of posts to this thread, but I couldn't help but wonder who is prepared for the Zombie Apocalypse? I personally am.



Some are. The following guide is available on Amazon.com:

No. 124     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Jan 28, 2012 at 4:15 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Fakey_Ego wrote:

Sorry I have not read the epic amount of posts to this thread, but I couldn't help but wonder who is prepared for the Zombie Apocalypse? I personally am.



Some are. The following guide is available on Amazon.com:



I've seen that book at B&N. It appears to be quite good.

Interest is growing in leaps and bounds in survivalism and prepping in the United States. The deaf (spiritual, financial, etc.) tend to still have their ears stopped up, but that number is diminishing. With the growing interest, I am considering adding survival gear and supplies to my affliate marketing endeavors.
No. 125     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Jan 28, 2012 at 4:20 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

That would have been a great show to watch. I wonder if it's accessible to watch via the Internet?




OK, it appears that maybe what I have stumbled onto is not an existing National Geographic program but rather an ad for a new series coming in February hosted by National Geographic titled like "Doomsday Preppers".
No. 126     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Jan 28, 2012 at 4:23 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Christian_Gent wrote:

That would have been a great show to watch. I wonder if it's accessible to watch via the Internet?




OK, it appears that maybe what I have stumbled onto is not an existing National Geographic program but rather an ad for a new series coming in February hosted by National Geographic titled like "Doomsday Preppers".


Oh Brother!
No. 127     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Jan 29, 2012 at 9:58 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Interest is growing in leaps and bounds in survivalism and prepping in the United States. The deaf (spiritual, financial, etc.) tend to still have their ears stopped up, but that number is diminishing. With the growing interest, I am considering adding survival gear and supplies to my affliate marketing endeavors.



I have been individually marketing such items over the past 6-12 months and they have become some of my largest moving items. I have tried the affiliate path but do not do as well as marketing on my own via such as eBay and Amazon. In fact, I rarely get an affiliate sell although I do see potential in that arena. I have a lot of things on the burner, but sometime soon plan to revisit my affiliate efforts and see what I need to change.

Even with most all of my individual transactions now being a drop ship sell were as I never even see or touch the actual sold item, I am finding less and less time to keep up with that path. The affiliate path appears could be the least direct effort required method to online selling.
No. 128     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 11:17 AM     
For those interested in such items, one of Amazon's "deals of day" today will the the Eton Axis Self-Powered Safety Hub. These are American Red Cross suggested self-powered emergency radios equipped with an AM/FM/NOAA weather radio and other features such a USB cell phone charger. You can tune into a variety of AM/FM stations and also 7 preset NOAA weather channels.
No. 129     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 12:04 PM     
Darrell wrote:

For those interested in such items, one of Amazon's "deals of day" today will the the Eton Axis Self-Powered Safety Hub. These are American Red Cross suggested self-powered emergency radios equipped with an AM/FM/NOAA weather radio and other features such a USB cell phone charger. You can tune into a variety of AM/FM stations and also 7 preset NOAA weather channels.



I just purchased one minutes ago. Been looking at such radios since last year. At this price, I settled on this one for now.
No. 130     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 12:20 PM     


Other than I opted for the black model. Actually, I purchased one of each color. The white one will go to my daughter.
No. 131     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 12:47 PM     
I just picked up this exact radio for $5.50 from Safeway, it was on their 50 percent off rack in the back of the store and it's got a crank generator on the back of it.

No. 132     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 12:51 PM     
insular926 wrote:

I just picked up this exact radio for $5.50 from Safeway, it was on their 50 percent off rack in the back of the store and it's got a crank generator on the back of it.




Good price.

Years ago, Craig was a fairly reliable low cost brand. Not sure about now.

The models I just purchased are offered by Grundig. A very reliable high quality and highly respected brand name in the industry. They cost me $39.99 each shipped free. These typically run $69.99 each to over $80 each.
No. 133     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 1:07 PM     
My black one:




I find that white in such devices gets dirty looking quickly and shows "scars" from use more easily. I would have purchsed two black ones, but Amazon limits you to one of each at that low of a price. Guess I could login under another ID and buy more.

They are going quickly as a "deal of the day". Almost 60% sold out in less than 20 minutes.
No. 134     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 9:12 PM     
Since becoming more interested in the "survival theme", I added such items to my eBay sales effort and they have done well. Just today I started offering complete security surveillance systems with 8 cameras each capable of night vision and motion detection, and a digital recorder. There has been a lot of interest. Sold two complete sets so far today.
No. 135     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 10:10 PM     


Anyone know of a good battery backup pack or small generator that can run off solar? Of course gas would be great but kinda interested in solar for this.

No. 136     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 10:19 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:



Anyone know of a good battery backup pack or small generator that can run off solar? Of course gas would be great but kinda interested in solar for this.




What are you looking to power with it?
No. 137     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 10:22 PM     
Electronics & small devices mostly.

No. 138     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 10:31 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

Electronics & small devices mostly.




I have a Duracell DPP-600HD Powerpack 600. Works well for me. I have a Brunton SOLARIS 26 watt folding solar panel that fully charges it in about 8-10 hours. Best prices on the powerpack seem to be on Amazon. I got mine last year for about $118. They now run about $170. This particular solar panel is not cheap. They are now over $350 new. Last year you could get them new for about $220. But I have seen them used on eBay for less than $200. In fact, I buy them when I see them for less than $200 and resell them with the Duracell as a solar generator package. Seems the last 3 used ones I snagged for about $140 each. Sold them for much more.

You can use less costly solar panels but to efficiently charge the powerpack it needs to be capable of about 30 watts output. The Solaris, even though sold as a 26 watt panel, will put out more than 26 watts. Brunton uses the latest and most efficient material technology available in their solar panels as far as output per square inch and thickness of the material used. Theirs are made of copper indium gallium diSelenide were as most other panels are made of monocrystalline silicon or even less efficient amorphous silicon.
No. 139     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 10:33 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Christian_Gent wrote:



Anyone know of a good battery backup pack or small generator that can run off solar? Of course gas would be great but kinda interested in solar for this.




What are you looking to power with it?


Just ran across this setup that looks pretty neat!



No. 140     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 10:35 PM     
This is mine. Weighs just a little over 30 pounds and has a small footprint. About 13" long, 9" wide, and 12" high. Obviously not going to get me totally off the grid but will do in a pinch:




And a picture with a folding solar panel. In bright sunlight, that little panel will fully charge the powerpack in about 10 hours:




Duracell offers smaller wattage less costly powerpacks, but I determined I wanted at least a 600 watt unit for my expected needs.

I put my solar generator package together for about $350. Similar packages are being sold from $800 to as much as $1600.

I have been selling my setup for $500-$600.
No. 141     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 10:38 PM     
CG - For some reason I cannot see your video.

I finally went directly to the video using the link and viewed the goalzero. I really like the stacking feature of their powerpacks but not their panels. I seen these some where last year when doing my research.
No. 142     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 10, 2012 at 10:48 PM     
I also have a framed solar panel that is excellent for charging a 600 watt or less powerpack, but not very portable. It is 2" X 21" X 48".
No. 143     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 11, 2012 at 10:47 AM     
I have thought about doing a video to promote my own package. I have encountered others out there using the Duracell powerpacks with a variety of other solar panels, but had only stumbled on to one other doing exactly the same as I with the folding panels. Since I packaged my system, I see that Amazon now promotes a solar generator package using the exact components I do for a portable system. To the best of my knowledge they do not yet promote a package using the Duracell with a rigid framed panel as I do. I assemble systems with both types of panels.

I also have plans and a process to manufacture my own solar panels. They can be built at a small fraction of the cost of commercial made panels. But at the moment, time and only one of me limits pursuing that avenue.

Although my daughter has become very interested in what I do and desiring to get her feet wet in an online and/or home business.
No. 144     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 11, 2012 at 1:59 PM     
Darrell wrote:

CG - For some reason I cannot see your video.


Weird. It shows up fine on my browser. I'll recheck the code.



I finally went directly to the video using the link and viewed the goalzero. I really like the stacking feature of their powerpacks but not their panels. I seen these some where last year when doing my research.


Yeah, the stacking feature was awesome. I don't really know much about solar panel technology but I find it interesting nonetheless. I'm wondering if other solar panels could be used instead? Do they simply need the right connectors?

No. 145     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 13, 2012 at 4:34 PM     
Last day today (Tues) for 25% off Mountain House meals plus FREE shipping from Ready Made Resources

http://www.readymaderesources.com/
No. 146     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 13, 2012 at 5:41 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

Darrell wrote:

CG - For some reason I cannot see your video.


Weird. It shows up fine on my browser. I'll recheck the code.



I finally went directly to the video using the link and viewed the goalzero. I really like the stacking feature of their powerpacks but not their panels. I seen these some where last year when doing my research.


Yeah, the stacking feature was awesome. I don't really know much about solar panel technology but I find it interesting nonetheless. I'm wondering if other solar panels could be used instead? Do they simply need the right connectors?




Your code was not the issue. Something weird was going on with an adobe file on my PC. All was fine once shutdown and rebooted but I have never gotten such an error before.
No. 147     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Lissa5246   Gender: F   Age: 53   on  Mar 13, 2012 at 6:44 PM     
I raise a lot of my own foods and can a lot the old timey way, can do with sour dough bread and other dried foods and can even do shelter. Lanterns lots of things belonging to my late grandparents to make it. What worries me is medications. You can stock pile maybe a month or so but what about insulin and meds such as these, Heart medication and blood pressure medicine for our elderly? It's a lot to think about.
No. 148     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 14, 2012 at 7:41 PM     
Lissa5246 wrote:

You can stock pile maybe a month or so but what about insulin and meds such as these, Heart medication and blood pressure medicine for our elderly? It's a lot to think about.


Good question. Nothing is certain, even with medication, however dropping a large portion of meat, dairy, and starches from a person's diet along with continual exercise seems to work here. I've heard that trying to change someone's diet is harder than trying to change their religion!

I tried going to a 100% vegan diet without even trying to wean myself onto that, and it broke my will after 6 days. With a meal or two with meats, I was able to go vegan for a few more days until I had to repeat that again. Not easy. Now, I incorporate veggies to be around 50% of my daily caloric intake either through juicing or V-8s. That's been somewhat sustainable to where I'm quite comfy with that. I've read that high blood pressure and related diseases can be reversed when coupled with exercise and lower meat/starches/processed food intake.

Hopefully before a collapse happens, a person change their lifestyle as much as possible to be as healthy as they can. Most won't so we can only be accountable to ourselves I guess. Some won't be able to regardless, which is understandable. God help us all.

No. 149     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 14, 2012 at 8:37 PM     
Lissa5246 wrote:

I raise a lot of my own foods and can a lot the old timey way, can do with sour dough bread and other dried foods and can even do shelter. Lanterns lots of things belonging to my late grandparents to make it. What worries me is medications. You can stock pile maybe a month or so but what about insulin and meds such as these, Heart medication and blood pressure medicine for our elderly? It's a lot to think about.



It may take me a bit to find my list, but there are books out there that provide some great info on addressing the issues of when no doctors or medicines are around.

LOL. Thus the reason I consider my Kindle or Nook a survival item. Such books can be downloaded to and stored on such a device for quick and handy reference.

In fact, you can even create your reference lists and store them on such a device for quick reference as needed.
No. 150     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 16, 2012 at 8:26 AM     
Darrell wrote:

LOL. Thus the reason I consider my Kindle or Nook a survival item. Such books can be downloaded to and stored on such a device for quick and handy reference.



Amen. That's what I think of my iPad as well. I realized that I needed to find a way to consolidate all the books I have, future books I'll read, and movies I can watch on the go whenever I want along with internet usage if I swing by a hotspot.

The iPad 3 just came out but not sure if I'll upgrade from an iPad 1 since it still serves my purposes without really seeing anything earth shattering. I read my iPad every night before going to sleep along with every morning. Was watching part of a movie this morning. lol

No. 151     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 17, 2012 at 3:07 PM     
Today Amazon.com will have the Xantrex XPower Powerpack 600HD as a lightening deal of the day. About an hour from now.

This is essentially the same as my Duracell 600HD. Xantrex actually makes both.

Not sure what the price will be until the deal begins, but my experience is Amazon discounts things substantially for these lightening deals. I often use it as a source of items just to try them out and if I do not like it I most often sell it on eBay for more than it cost me even after taking shipping into consideration.
No. 152     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 17, 2012 at 4:06 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Today Amazon.com will have the Xantrex XPower Powerpack 600HD as a lightening deal of the day. About an hour from now.

This is essentially the same as my Duracell 600HD. Xantrex actually makes both.

Not sure what the price will be until the deal begins, but my experience is Amazon discounts things substantially for these lightening deals. I often use it as a source of items just to try them out and if I do not like it I most often sell it on eBay for more than it cost me even after taking shipping into consideration.



$143.95 shipped free. Not all that much lower than it typically cost but about a $26 savings if one is going to buy one anyway.
No. 153     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 17, 2012 at 7:13 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Darrell wrote:

Today Amazon.com will have the Xantrex XPower Powerpack 600HD as a lightening deal of the day. About an hour from now.

This is essentially the same as my Duracell 600HD. Xantrex actually makes both.

Not sure what the price will be until the deal begins, but my experience is Amazon discounts things substantially for these lightening deals. I often use it as a source of items just to try them out and if I do not like it I most often sell it on eBay for more than it cost me even after taking shipping into consideration.



$143.95 shipped free. Not all that much lower than it typically cost but about a $26 savings if one is going to buy one anyway.



I had actually planned to purchase another of these at first opportunity for myself, but think I will wait and get myself a 1500 watt or 1800 watt.
No. 154     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 17, 2012 at 7:28 PM     
This is the 1500 watt I have my eye on. A Xantrex 802-1500 XPower 1,500 Watt Portable Powerpack. I have a rigid frame solar panel that is capable of keeping it charged, but would prefer to have folding panels linked together for better portability. The folding panels are a little costly at the moment to have just laying around. About this time last year they took a price drop. See what happens this year. Actually I had like 4 of the folding ones but allowed them to move out as sold inventory.





Below is what my rigid framed panel is:




No. 155     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 19, 2012 at 1:18 AM     
Stormy, unless you live in an area that is knwonfor hurricanes, tornadoes or earthquakes, this is jut not a very good investment in my ook for something that might or mightnot happen. Even at the price, which isn't bad and I'd consider since my home town is knwon for tornadoes and hurricanes, you can still put a lot of food on the table for $145.00. We get occassional ice storms too, but that price still doesn't offset the cost of a small diessel or gasoline generator that would do the same thing on ehe rare instnces that it would be needed. There's just not enough likelihood of any kind of long-term colapse or ongoing disaster to justify investment in this kind of thing considerring tht if such were to happen your own chances of personal survival would be considerably less than the power pack's.
No. 156     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  David4258   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Mar 20, 2012 at 9:31 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Darrell wrote:

insular926 wrote:

Silver prices have recently Took A Dump though but maybe it's time to get back in.



There is probably going to come a time even before this year is out that many may not have such an affordable opportunity to get into silver again in the foreseeable future such as there is now.


Exactly, it is not a "dump" but rather a "dip", and you buy on the dips.


Where can you buy silver? I've wanted to for a couple years now, just never got serious... now I am. Hope you find this as this is getting to be a long thread!
No. 157     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 20, 2012 at 9:37 AM     
David unless you are a coin collector and are buying silver coins for the collector's value, the intrinsic value of silver is too unpredictable to be a valid,solid investment. It falls up and down too regularly based on industrial demand to be a solid hedge against inflation. Any coin shop will sell you either silver or gold ccins or silver or gold bullion but if your're looking at investment, mint to near mint coins are your best value.
No. 158     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  David4258   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Mar 20, 2012 at 9:43 AM     
anybody heard of a "steripen"? portable, battery operated UV water purifier. heard about this on KNLB, Christian radio station; father was talking about his daughter's mission trip in Africa. She used this pen for her drinking water, and was the only person on the team of ten or so that did NOT get sick.

http://www.freshwatersystems.com/p-4481-steripen-classic-water-purifier.aspx

on sale now 67.00-- i'm gonna check amazon

Oh yeah, here we go! modified, sorry forgot to add the link
http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=steripen&tag=mh0b-20&index=sporting&hvadid=55531068&ref=pd_sl_73trceendr_p
better prices, and here's one with a SOLAR charging case! wooo hoooo, I'm in. Get it, STORMIE! Puts her in yer backpack. :D
No. 159     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 20, 2012 at 10:19 AM     
This is a wonderful investment if you're going to a palce with known bad water or live in a place prone to contamination. However, if you think it's going to be any realy use in the case of a major isaster, forget it. Rhwy qill nor peoxwaa rhR that much water and there are filters and hoses that must be replaced and changed regularly. Multiiply the price by severa hundred and you'l get a year or so of use out of the purefier.
No. 160     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 20, 2012 at 11:15 PM     
I've been looking for water storage containers that were transportable, sturdy, and stackable so I was excited when I saw "Water Bricks" online. They seem to be great for my particular usage. Ordered several, and will probably order several more to give my to my sister's family.



Here's a few videos on these remarkable water storage containers. This will work well with my new Berkey water filtering system along with a creek I have out back in my new place. http://www.waterbrick.org/waterbrick-videos.php


Here's a video.

No. 161     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 20, 2012 at 11:37 PM     
David4258662 wrote:
Where can you buy silver? I've wanted to for a couple years now, just never got serious... now I am. Hope you find this as this is getting to be a long thread!


You can get it quite easily actually. You could either look in your local phone book or do a google search for "gold coin dealers + zip code" and find many in your local area. Silver bullion is very liquid so it shouldn't present too much of a problem selling it. You can also buy it online from several reputable online dealers. I've purchased several from apmex.com and it arrived quickly & securely.

Many advisors recommend to start off with coins or rounds in 1oz denominations, then pursue larger denominations for long-term investing such as 1 kilo or 100 oz bars. I would stay away from collector coins like minted-PCGS because you're paying a premium on top of the spot price of silver that is what vendors try to mark up as much as possible. In a crunch, few will be willing to pay that premium anyway, and will resort to the spot price of silver instead.



Here's a 10-yr chart on silver. I plan on holding onto it for decades if possible, but will sell some after major uptrend spikes too.



No. 162     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 21, 2012 at 1:15 AM     
All of this is the result of induced panic and deliberately instilled fear. In a year, two years, you'll see where you wasted your money and wish that you hadn't.
No. 163     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 21, 2012 at 1:22 AM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

I've been looking for water storage containers that were transportable, sturdy, and stackable so I was excited when I saw "Water Bricks" online. They seem to be great for my particular usage. Ordered several, and will probably order several more to give my to my sister's family.






I like the idea of these. Last summer we had a considerably long power outage one evening and all through the night. Although my little solar generator provided electricity for lights and kept the computer going for a while, that did nothing to help me get water for bathing in the AM and flushing the stool. I most always have purchased bottled drinking water on hand.
No. 164     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 21, 2012 at 1:40 AM     
These are excellent if you are preparing for something that is possible and happens from time to time. For long term 'survical', they are wasted money.
No. 165     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 21, 2012 at 11:56 AM     
Jimmy98 wrote:

All of this is the result of induced panic and deliberately instilled fear. In a year, two years, you'll see where you wasted your money and wish that you hadn't.


I've noticed that you always seem to discount oths that DO provide facts without ever providing any facts to support your side. Me? I starting buying silver about 7 years ago when it was around $7/oz. Yeah, I'm up around 500% and not worried one bit about the fluctuation of silver's spot price. I did my due diligence in 2005 and continued a strong hand, so my facts have been backed up by results.

You?

:popcorn:

No. 166     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 21, 2012 at 12:40 PM     
I didn't say don't buy sillver. I do myself. I said buy coins. They have a higher vlue and hold their value longer. the same can be said for gold. Jewelry and bullion are not nearly as good an investment as coins. I've been buying silveer and gold coins for years and the vlue just eeeps rising. There is no fluctuation, only an upward spiral.
No. 167     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 21, 2012 at 2:27 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:



Here's a 10-yr chart on silver. I plan on holding onto it for decades if possible, but will sell some after major uptrend spikes too.





Sooooo, my friend, you think 10 yr. old silver charts are also going to be worth more money in a decade. Veeeeery inteeeeeresting!

:tongue:
No. 168     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 21, 2012 at 2:51 PM     
This is my point about buying coins in a nutshell. Coin values always go up because the age of the coin adds to the intrinsic value of the metal snf uduslly by a wide margin.
No. 169     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 21, 2012 at 7:29 PM     
Jimmy98 wrote:

This is my point about buying coins in a nutshell. Coin values always go up because the age of the coin adds to the intrinsic value of the metal snf uduslly by a wide margin.


Actually, you're quite incorrect since you make no distinction between "coins" and "bullion". Bullion is sold through either coins (government mints), rounds (refinery mints), or by bars (refinery mints mostly). I know since I hold all three.

What you're possibly referring to are "collector" coins or proofs which is what I, and many other reputable metal advisors, try to steer others away from because a customer is negotiating apparent value above & beyond the cost of the underlining metal. It's a game made to increase the spread of dealers rather than value to buyers. Practically ALL of the investment analyst have advised to steer away from these as I have explained on my previous post.

I have already sold 100 oz bricks before and know how spreads work related to spot price. It's an acceptable medium. However with collector coins, value is too subjective and difficult to verify purity too, on many of them. With bullion, it's on the metal itself, clear cut, easily bought & sold.



No. 170     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 22, 2012 at 2:20 AM     
I have never lost money on collector's coins and have seen values rise year by year. Bullion as you describe it is subject to the rise and fall in market value of the specific metal and... is subject to siezure ust as it was in the 1930s at which time you are paid the 'fixed' price for the bullion, set by the governemnt at that ime, and lose most of your initial investment. Coins re immne from this as is most gold and silver jeweley of good quality.
No. 171     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 22, 2012 at 5:30 PM     
I too have never lost money in collector coins. They have intrinsic value that remains regardless of the current value of silver or gold. Although, if either rise in prices it is often simply icing on the cake for the collector coins.

A good bit of my gold and silver coins are of collector status, but that intrinsic value will probably be worth nil in a serious survival type situation. As far as real bartering power they become only worth the current market value of the precious metal at the time under most circumstances.

In fact, I have heard of valuable collector coins being found in the tills of local party stores. A buyer did not know what they had, the coins were stolen, or they simply "needed" to buy something to the point collector value of the coins no longer meant enough to them.
No. 172     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 22, 2012 at 5:42 PM     
If there is the kind of collapse that the fear monters seem to be hoping for, ten the intrinsic value of precious metal will only have value outside the US.
No. 173     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 28, 2012 at 5:31 PM     



I purchased the above folding solar panel package today.

Since last summer I have had customers showing interest in this model but had not personally tried one, therefore I was hesitant to offer the item. Appears it will charge my existing 600 watt powerpacks faster than my current Brunton folding models do and may offer enough wattage to effectively charge a 1500 or even an 1800 watt powerpack.
No. 174     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 29, 2012 at 2:40 AM     
When I was a kid I worked at the locasl "Piggly Wiggly" grocery. One day an old lady who lived across the street came in a driving rain to do her weekly shopping. Whe was in he 80s and we always carried her things home for her since she only lived across the parkig lot. She gave me a one dollar tip. Of the four quarters she gave me, the most recently minted was 1905, U gave tehm back to her and explained that they aere quite valuable. She handed them back and told me to save them for as long as she had and one day they'd be worth even more. I still have them.
No. 175     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 29, 2012 at 6:20 AM     
Jimmy98 wrote:

When I was a kid I worked at the locasl "Piggly Wiggly" grocery. One day an old lady who lived across the street came in a driving rain to do her weekly shopping. Whe was in he 80s and we always carried her things home for her since she only lived across the parkig lot. She gave me a one dollar tip. Of the four quarters she gave me, the most recently minted was 1905, U gave tehm back to her and explained that they aere quite valuable. She handed them back and told me to save them for as long as she had and one day they'd be worth even more. I still have them.



I too still have more than one piece of currency handed to me when I just a kid. Amongst one being an 1856 Flying Eagle Cent and another being an 1853 Liberty Head "V" Nickel. I have a lot of old coins and some old currencies. American and foreign.
No. 176     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 29, 2012 at 8:45 AM     
Darrell wrote:




I purchased the above folding solar panel package today.

Since last summer I have had customers showing interest in this model but had not personally tried one, therefore I was hesitant to offer the item. Appears it will charge my existing 600 watt powerpacks faster than my current Brunton folding models do and may offer enough wattage to effectively charge a 1500 or even an 1800 watt powerpack.


I would be interested in this along with a 800+ watt powerpack. Who makes them? Reviews? Thanks.

No. 177     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 31, 2012 at 8:33 PM     
Hey Darrell, you there?

No. 178     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 31, 2012 at 8:41 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

Hey Darrell, you there?




Wow! Sorry I left such info out.

The product is GoSolar by California Solar Accessories.

CASolarAccessories.com

Comes in a 26 watt and a 42 watt model. I have found the best prices to be on Amazon.

Appears I am going to have to custom make a cable to be able to connect it to my Duracell Powerpack or route it through a different inverter with a 110 outlet other than what is included with the panel. I am opting for custom making a cable.
No. 179     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 31, 2012 at 8:51 PM     
It appears the CASolarAccessories website is down or maybe no longer is.
No. 180     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Mar 31, 2012 at 9:02 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Christian_Gent wrote:

Hey Darrell, you there?




Wow! Sorry I left such info out.

The product is GoSolar by California Solar Accessories.

CASolarAccessories.com

Comes in a 26 watt and a 42 watt model. I have found the best prices to be on Amazon.

Appears I am going to have to custom make a cable to be able to connect it to my Duracell Powerpack or route it through a different invertor with a 110 outlet other than what is included with the panel. I am opting for custom making a cable.


Link doesn't seem to work.

No. 181     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  SonShines   Gender: F   Age: 32   on  Mar 31, 2012 at 9:05 PM     
National Geographic Channel is having a Doomsday Preppers marathon tonight

just thought you all may want to know
No. 182     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Mar 31, 2012 at 9:07 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Appears I am going to have to custom make a cable to be able to connect it to my Duracell Powerpack or route it through a different inverter with a 110 outlet other than what is included with the panel. I am opting for custom making a cable.



I will take this back. I was just going through the included accessories and there is a 100 watt DC to AC inverter that has the appropriate connector to be connected to the panel and provides a 110 outlet allowing me to charge the Duracell with this panel without the need to custom make a cable.
No. 183     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 1, 2012 at 10:01 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

Darrell wrote:

Christian_Gent wrote:

Hey Darrell, you there?




Wow! Sorry I left such info out.

The product is GoSolar by California Solar Accessories.

CASolarAccessories.com

Comes in a 26 watt and a 42 watt model. I have found the best prices to be on Amazon.

Appears I am going to have to custom make a cable to be able to connect it to my Duracell Powerpack or route it through a different invertor with a 110 outlet other than what is included with the panel. I am opting for custom making a cable.


Link doesn't seem to work.




Maybe they are one of Obama's failed green technology endeavors.
No. 184     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  Apr 1, 2012 at 10:12 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

Just ran across this setup that looks pretty neat!





Looks like Goal Zero will be coming out with a new power pack called the Yeti 1250 that will be able to hold 1250 Watt hours with stackability for even more storable power. Looks like it'll still use the same 30w solar panel which doesn't make sense to power up these bad boys. It'll take a week to fill these up with power!





You can even plug up a refrigerator for up to 4 days with this bad boy. Wow! If you stack it, you'll be able to sustain yourself for days without alerting anyone compared to the noise a generator causes.



No. 185     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 7, 2012 at 11:18 AM     
Out and about this AM I noticed an ad that the local police are offering a crisis response class. I attend as many such programs as I am able. A lot of information is repeat information I have seen before, but I see that as a good thing in developing the desired reaction to become instinctive.
No. 186     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 7, 2012 at 2:57 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Out and about this AM I noticed an ad that the local police are offering a crisis response class. I attend as many such programs as I am able. A lot of information is repeat information I have seen before, but I see that as a good thing in developing the desired reaction to become instinctive.


It can also be a good thing to get training and affiliate with the local Civil Defense agencies. If nothing else, it will get you an official ID that will get you around when others are ordered to stay home.
No. 187     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 7, 2012 at 4:17 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Darrell wrote:

Out and about this AM I noticed an ad that the local police are offering a crisis response class. I attend as many such programs as I am able. A lot of information is repeat information I have seen before, but I see that as a good thing in developing the desired reaction to become instinctive.


It can also be a good thing to get training and affiliate with the local Civil Defense agencies. If nothing else, it will get you an official ID that will get you around when others are ordered to stay home.



I hear ya. I am already involved with the local Homeland Security Team.
No. 188     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 7, 2012 at 5:29 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

Darrell wrote:

Out and about this AM I noticed an ad that the local police are offering a crisis response class. I attend as many such programs as I am able. A lot of information is repeat information I have seen before, but I see that as a good thing in developing the desired reaction to become instinctive.


It can also be a good thing to get training and affiliate with the local Civil Defense agencies. If nothing else, it will get you an official ID that will get you around when others are ordered to stay home.



I hear ya. I am already involved with the local Homeland Security Team.



It had been a while since I had been to a local Homeland Security Team meeting and/or training session. Today I decided to see what is going on. I learned the team has been disbanded in a cost savings effort. The responsibility of local Homeland Security now falls under the county sheriff’s department and I was provided information on becoming a volunteer reserve sheriff. The training for the local Homeland Security team is the exact same as the county sheriff officers take anyway. Too late in the weekend to make contact and obtain any pertinent info.
No. 189     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 21, 2012 at 5:03 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

Looks like Goal Zero will be coming out with a new power pack called the Yeti 1250 that will be able to hold 1250 Watt hours with stackability for even more storable power. Looks like it'll still use the same 30w solar panel which doesn't make sense to power up these bad boys. It'll take a week to fill these up with power!



Today I purchased the Goal Zero Nomad 7 portable panel. Will see how she works.


No. 190     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 21, 2012 at 7:40 PM     
OK, I just purchased another Nomad 7 panel including the Guide 10 battery pack. Goal Zero refers to the package as the Guide 10 Adventure Kit.

Also just purchased a little Sunforce 1.8 watt solar panel which is actually designed to simply keep a 12 volt battery trickle charged. My least driven vehicle often has the battery charge very low by the time I drive it again. Often requiring a jump to get started. Just thought I would see what this would do to help keep the battery charged.
No. 191     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 21, 2012 at 7:59 PM     
Stormy if you live in our society or woek abroad and plan to return as I do when I retire, you MUSt know what is going n both in our society and others. In fact, you have to be more aware than most because it all hits you at once and you have no time to react or respond. That mrsnd krrpinh up with things that most Americans either don't know or have hapened so slowly they take them for granted. It's a matter of literal self preservsyion snf dutbibsl in yrtmd that are infinitely morre dangrous to us than they are to you, since you've had more direct contact and time to perparee.
No. 192     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 22, 2012 at 10:10 AM     
LOL. I purchased another set of 4 panels this AM for testing. Includes four 15W amorphous solar panels, a PVC mounting frame, a 7-amp charge controller, 200-watt inverter, and required wiring/connection cables.

I have some experimenting and research to get done to offer my various generator packages. The interest got heavy about this time last year and I simply was not ready. Making an effort to be more pro-active this time around. There seems to be a lot of interest in higher wattage packages than I can offer cost effectively using the folding panels, but at the same time buyers are looking for something light weight, weather resistant, quick to set up, and less costly than the folding panels. This package may fit the bill. The frame is PVC pipe and assembles quickly with bolts and wing nuts. The panels are weather proof and quickly attach to the frame with bolts and wing nuts. The entire package cost about 50% of the leading folding panels.

I would love to be building my own panels for resell and feel I could easily offer a package such as this for much less cost yet. In fact, with the powerpacks I use, my generator package only requires the panels and frame and does not need all the other accessories included in this package. But I simply do not have the time and cannot seem to find a clone I can trust.




No. 193     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 22, 2012 at 11:45 AM     
My mother was in the green house and nursery businesss for 45 years ands he thought I was nuts wen I installed some of the first, vry primitive solar panels and connected them t heathers in the houses that had the most cold sensiitive plants inthem. The next spring she ha me woking my whole leave doing the same on all of her huses because ofthe lower electric and gas billls.
No. 194     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Joyful_In_Him   Gender: F   Age: 58   on  Apr 22, 2012 at 12:04 PM     
At the risk of sounding elementary, one should always keep in mind that water is #1 priority.

Food comes next.

It is a great policy to be wise and keep our lamps full of oil and one needs only research to decide what works best for thier individual circumstances. Where you live, your income, your health can all be taken into consideration.

The freeze dried food (quite expensive) is also loaded with sodium so these are probably not the best choice for someone with high blood pressure.

The most common problem with food storage is to purchase items you don't really like and will not eat. Buy what you like, use it and rotate it.

One really should have a water purification system. Is there a chance you will never use it? Of course. Then again, they are not that much. Personal choice.

I like this topic. It ties into prophesy, too.
No. 195     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Joyful_In_Him   Gender: F   Age: 58   on  Apr 22, 2012 at 12:06 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

Christian_Gent wrote:

Just ran across this setup that looks pretty neat!





Looks like Goal Zero will be coming out with a new power pack called the Yeti 1250 that will be able to hold 1250 Watt hours with stackability for even more storable power. Looks like it'll still use the same 30w solar panel which doesn't make sense to power up these bad boys. It'll take a week to fill these up with power!





You can even plug up a refrigerator for up to 4 days with this bad boy. Wow! If you stack it, you'll be able to sustain yourself for days without alerting anyone compared to the noise a generator causes.






I likey!
No. 196     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Joyful_In_Him   Gender: F   Age: 58   on  Apr 22, 2012 at 12:14 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Have yet to sell a solar generator, but my offerings of other survival type items have started selling within hours of the ads being posted. There is obviously a serious market out there for such items.

BTW - I forgot to share that last Christmas I added a handheld GPS to my personal equipment/gear.


Correct, Darrell. There is more to it than just purchasing the "toys" necessary to power up in a downed grid. People who are interested in living off the grid need to educate themselves. I did a television spot once teaching some basics on pioneer living. Knowledge is great.
No. 197     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Jimmy98   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 23, 2012 at 8:02 AM     
Keep in mind that the US power gri is like any other national system. It is not centrallly controlled but is run from regions and sub-reginns. One part of the grid could go doww, or seveal at once but others would function normally and poweer could be 'shunted' to areas that were out. This has happene seeral times before. You also have a lesser chance of losing power if you live near a hydro plant or other electric generating pllant. Not even a full scale nuclear war can blow out the entire power grid in a country the size of the US. Preparation shoul e proportional to need and preceived need and not on the notion tht the entire power grid for the entire nation can or would fail. Also, there is less chance of failure in a rural area.
No. 198     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 24, 2012 at 10:01 PM     
I decided this one is too cumbersome and prone to external damage when folded out for my personal portable needs. But I seem to have buyers that like it. A transaction on one of these provides me a gross profit of $80.

At the moment I still prefer a Brunton for portable use. But I have not had an opportunity to test the Goal Zeros yet. They arrived today.





Darrell wrote:




I purchased the above folding solar panel package today.

Since last summer I have had customers showing interest in this model but had not personally tried one, therefore I was hesitant to offer the item. Appears it will charge my existing 600 watt powerpacks faster than my current Brunton folding models do and may offer enough wattage to effectively charge a 1500 or even an 1800 watt powerpack.
No. 199     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 24, 2012 at 10:06 PM     
Jimmy98 wrote:

Keep in mind that the US power gri is like any other national system. It is not centrallly controlled but is run from regions and sub-reginns. One part of the grid could go doww, or seveal at once but others would function normally and poweer could be 'shunted' to areas that were out. This has happene seeral times before. You also have a lesser chance of losing power if you live near a hydro plant or other electric generating pllant. Not even a full scale nuclear war can blow out the entire power grid in a country the size of the US. Preparation shoul e proportional to need and preceived need and not on the notion tht the entire power grid for the entire nation can or would fail. Also, there is less chance of failure in a rural area.



Well, I lose power 4-6 times per year now without there being a major disaster. My portable solar generator has served me well during those periods as well as avoiding some electricity cost in normal periods of use.
No. 200     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 28, 2012 at 12:15 AM     
Even though I already own more than one backpack, I purchased both of the following bags today. Finally getting around to preparing a couple custom bug out bags to leave at the ready. What I like a lot about the larger one is the top section can be removed and used as a separate lumbar pack or shoulder sling. What I like about the smaller one is that if I desire to not use as a backpack it also makes for a great high performance camera bag. It also meets requirements to be used as a carry-on bag. These are both by Mountainsmith. A Falcon 55 and an Approach 35.

No. 201     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Darrell   Gender: M   Age: 58   on  Apr 29, 2012 at 3:01 AM     
Picked up a couple of these to keep in the bags:

Gerber 31-000749 Bear Grylls Survival Series Ultimate Multi-Tool with Nylon Sheath

No. 202     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Christian_Gent   Gender: M   Age: 40   on  May 2, 2012 at 10:25 AM     
Darrell wrote:



Really like the one on the left for a BoB. Haven't really set one up yet but will be this month. I also have another hiking pack that I use for trekking & power walking, however it's not really designed for a BoB.

No. 203     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  Aug 21, 2014 at 3:44 PM     
Darrell wrote:

This weekend I ordered a Folding Solar LED Lantern.



I've had one of these for several years now. My brother liked mine so much that I got him one for his birthday.
No. 204     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Feb 19, 2015 at 4:41 PM     
Picked up two military style metal ammo boxes at Sam's Club today. $19 for the pair. A 50 cal box and a 30 cal box. They are clearance priced. Likely leftover from hunting season. They do not seem as heavy as my actual military issues, but for the price I may go back and get another pair.
No. 205     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Feb 19, 2015 at 8:37 PM     
was lookin at the dates on this tread,

it's amazin that I was not even here
with storm postin this info, everyone interested, wish I could have been here, did we sell a bunch of this stuff or what, am trying to stock back up just for myself, have very few items left except for essentials...

its heartwarming knowing y'all & others were doing this. then, before and now
you too survivor and every one else...
No. 206     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Feb 19, 2015 at 9:05 PM     
Darrell wrote:

I too have never lost money in collector coins. They have intrinsic value that remains regardless of the current value of silver or gold. Although, if either rise in prices it is often simply icing on the cake for the collector coins.


The other day I heard of a stash of collector baseball cards being discovered in the attic of a Grandfather that had passed. These were in brand new condition and the quantity of them so high, that introducing them to the market would have "crashed" the current market prices. Therefore they are incrementally introducing them to the market.

It gave me cause to ponder that such could happen with some of my collector value coins. Thus reducing the value to the current market value of bullion.
No. 207     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Feb 19, 2015 at 9:37 PM     
never look at intrinsic value of metals, all will ultimately go to melt
anyhow, has happened for thousands of years, really like that most of the refiners have gone to proper balanced acid refining, was doing it before they were, they just get their chemicals by the trainload. know it?
No. 208     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  Feb 19, 2015 at 10:21 PM     
crayons wrote:

was lookin at the dates on this tread,

it's amazin that I was not even here
with storm postin this info, everyone interested, wish I could have been here, did we sell a bunch of this stuff or what, am trying to stock back up just for myself, have very few items left except for essentials...

its heartwarming knowing y'all & others were doing this. then, before and now
you too survivor and every one else...


My brother and woke up in 2008 to what was going on behind the scenes/news. I think I woke up from the financial crash, and then my brother soon woke up from discussions with me. Previously we, like most, didn't really have a clue. We were your typical Republicans, thinking it was all about getting 'our' guy into office, little realizing there was no real difference between the parties when it came to actions, like so many around all of us and many on this site still do.

I'm curious as to why you got rid of your stuff in the first place, and than had to replace it.
No. 209     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Feb 19, 2015 at 10:25 PM     
I am no smoker, but I purchased a traditional classic style Zippo lighter last week. Then had to go find a can of fluid. Even though I have never smoked, I have always thought the old lighters were cool.

This is the one I purchased:



I also purchased four sets of these magnesium fire starters. I had never ever used one until last week. They are very effective.

No. 210     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Feb 20, 2015 at 9:41 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

crayons wrote:

was lookin at the dates on this tread,

it's amazin that I was not even here
with storm postin this info, everyone interested, wish I could have been here, did we sell a bunch of this stuff or what, am trying to stock back up just for myself, have very few items left except for essentials...

its heartwarming knowing y'all & others were doing this. then, before and now
you too survivor and every one else...



My brother and woke up in 2008 to what was going on behind the scenes/news. I think I woke up from the financial crash, and then my brother soon woke up from discussions with me. Previously we, like most, didn't really have a clue. We were your typical Republicans, thinking it was all about getting 'our' guy into office, little realizing there was no real difference between the parties when it came to actions, like so many around all of us and many on this site still do.

I'm curious as to why you got rid of your stuff in the first place, and than had to replace it.
well got a deal on some 7k diesel genny's, every body wanted one, so sold em...still have 2 gas
all the water tanks gone except for one 400 plus gallon one, its on a flatbed wash trailer, sold all the tents cept for one, there were other items, kept one of each lot,

just savin for more reload stuff, still have more than I need.
No. 211     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Feb 20, 2015 at 1:16 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

I am no smoker, but I purchased a traditional classic style Zippo lighter last week. Then had to go find a can of fluid.


Speaking of such, I have discovered that the local Meijer store has one checkout that has the "impulse" rack stocked with such items as lighter fluid, wicks, etc. But I purchased their last can of lighter fluid. Otherwise, I have not been able to find such stuff in local large stores. I imagine all the little smoker's stores have such. I never stop at them, did not even think about them until today.

When I was in NC I visited a huge smoker's store with a friend that was stocking up on cigars that he cannot find here in MI. We are in NC regularly and somehow he learned of this store. I never saw so many variety of lighters and smoker accessories in one place in my life.

I own a couple torches that use the little butane refills. The small 1.48oz/42g size. I have a habit of waiting until need a refill, and then hit like 3 stores before I find them in stock. They carry such low inventory on such items it seems they are always sold out. Trying to get in the habit of simply stocking up from Amazon.
No. 212     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Feb 24, 2015 at 11:59 PM     
I already have a slingshot that I am pretty good with. Have taken small game with the thing. But I am considering an upgrade to the following. There is even an attachment that will allow me to shoot my current compound bow arrows from it:

No. 213     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 4, 2015 at 6:07 PM     
http://www.planbsupply.com/
No. 214     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 11:06 AM     


Can be set up in about 25 minutes and no piece weighs over 20 pounds. Expensive at the moment, but as they begin to be mass produced they expect the price to drop drastically.

http://www.patriotheadquarters.com/rapid-deployment-modules/
No. 215     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 11:31 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:



Can be set up in about 25 minutes and no piece weighs over 20 pounds. Expensive at the moment, but as they begin to be mass produced they expect the price to drop drastically.

http://www.patriotheadquarters.com/rapid-deployment-modules/


I like this concept, but for a lot less money I have thrown up some pre-fab sheds fairly quickly that appear to offer just as much or more. Although there are plans for add on modules for these that offer amenities that may be inconvenient to add to a shed.
No. 216     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 7:28 PM     
I have been seeing videos lately for making a very cheap but effective emergency heater out of a can and a roll of toilet paper and 70% Isopropyl Alcohol.

You remove the cardboard tube then squish the roll together to eliminate the space in the middle then stuff it into an empty large soup, veggie, or fruit or small coffee can.

You then pour the alcohol into it then light it.

The toilet paper acts as a giant wick and does not produce any carbon monoxide fumes therefore you can use it indoors in your home.

With a few metal strips cut from another can one could easily cook on it as well.

The 30% water in the alcohol acts to keep the flame under control.

They say you can use these in a car too in an emergency (crack a window).

I bought some alcohol today and might try it tomorrow.

No. 217     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  YoungAndChristian52   Gender: F   Age: 30   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 7:33 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I have been seeing videos lately for making a very cheap but effective emergency heater out of a can and a roll of toilet paper and 70% Isopropyl Alcohol.

You remove the cardboard tube then squish the roll together to eliminate the space in the middle then stuff it into an empty large soup, veggie, or fruit or small coffee can.

You then pour the alcohol into it then light it.

The toilet paper acts as a giant wick and does not produce any carbon monoxide fumes therefore you can use it indoors in your home.

With a few metal strips cut from another can one could easily cook on it as well.

The 30% water in the alcohol acts to keep the flame under control.

They say you can use these in a car too in an emergency (crack a window).

I bought some alcohol today and might try it tomorrow.




OH my! That's simply amazing!

Also, Stormchaser, whats the best kind of survival equipment for a mudslide that you can recommend?
No. 218     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:04 PM     
Ok I decided I couldn't wait until tomorrow so I made one.

I used an old 15 oz ravioloi can. I peeled off the outer paper label, just in case.

I happened to have a roll of TP that was about 2/3rds full, the 1,000 sheet stuff, which is all I ever buy, lasts much longer.

Anyway I pulled out the inner cardboard tube, was pretty easy using your finger to pull it away from the tissue.

Once I pulled it out then I squished the roll together and stuffed it tightly into the can being sure to push it in so the tissue is about 1/8" below the rim.

I then began pouring the alcohol in, a little at a time. It took about 5-10 seconds or more for each pour to absorb since I packed it tight.

Eventually it stopped absorbing alcohol and the air bubbles ceased.

It absorbed not quite half a quart.

Ok here goes, i'm lighting the match....
No. 219     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:13 PM     
he's lighting the match....
No. 220     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:19 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:


Ok here goes, i'm lighting the match....


I would think it would work kind of like an alcohol burner or lamp. They work well.
No. 221     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:26 PM     
Ok it produced flames about 4-7" tall at first.

Now that some of the alcohol has burned 20 minutes later the flames are now 2-4, maybe 5" tall now.

As a precaution I placed it on a small camping propane stove burner (off) with some aluminum foil behind it.

Amazingly though the can stays very cool to the touch!

And just like the video said, the toilet paper does not burn, only the alcohol!

Burning for 25 minutes now.

Here is right after I first lit it up...

No. 222     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:30 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:


Ok here goes, i'm lighting the match....


I would think it would work kind of like an alcohol burner or lamp. They work well.

used to have an old coleman stove thet burned gasoline... a hand pumper,,,
used to use it at the dear lease many moons ago; boiling water for heat in freezin below 30 degree weather, dang o' rings are a problem after extreme use,
No. 223     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:33 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:


Ok here goes, i'm lighting the match....


I would think it would work kind of like an alcohol burner or lamp. They work well.


Yep with a BIG wick!

30 minutes now...
No. 224     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:40 PM     
I'm quite confident these little emergency alcohol heaters could be used in a car if stranded in subzero weather, WITH care of course!

Might be a good idea to place it in a pie tin or a bigger can so it won't tip over.

Would have to place it where nothing else could burn.

And I definitely would not fall asleep with one burning in a car for safety reasons.

Cost:

1 Quart of 70% Isopropyl Alcohol from Dollar General: $1.75.
1 partially used (no jokes there please) roll of toilet paper: .50 cents?
1 empty 15oz can of ravioli complete with ravioli residue.


No. 225     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:45 PM     
1 partially used (no jokes there please) roll of toilet paper:
already laughin
No. 226     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:46 PM     
The flame dances around just like a campfire, quite hypnotic and mezmerizing.

:unsure:

45 minutes now and still burning good.
No. 227     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:54 PM     
Ok 50 minutes later and now starting to see a little 1/4" spot on the toilet paper burn black now.

The upper part of the can is now warm but still cool enough to hold.

The lower part of the can is still cold.

I think after 60 minutes I will extinguish it and add more alcohol so the toilet paper doesn't burn and ruin.
No. 228     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 8:59 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

The flame dances around just like a campfire, quite hypnotic and mezmerizing.

:unsure:

45 minutes now and still burning good.
hey nothin wrong with suppressed pyro tendencies, when your cold and want to see what works, hey I get it,

hear they have propane and kerosene nowadays, used to experiment with
stuff too, entertaining stuff here though friend
No. 229     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 9:09 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Ok 50 minutes later and now starting to see a little 1/4" spot on the toilet paper burn black now.

The upper part of the can is npow warm but still cool enough to hold.

The lower part of the can is still cold.

I think after 60 minutes I will extinguish it and add more alcohol so the toilet paper doesn't burn and ruin.


After 1 hour the tp had some slight charring.

So I put it out, by blowing on it.

Added more alcohol but it only absorbed a few ounces so that means it didn't use much and there was still a lot of alcohol left in the can.

But to prevent the tp from charring you would have to add more alcohol after 45-60 minutes.
No. 230     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 9:21 PM     
crayons wrote:

hear they have propane and kerosene nowadays, used to experiment with
stuff too, entertaining stuff here though friend


Kerosene is hard to locate around here, not many gas stations carry it, only a few, and none nearby.

20lb Propane tanks are found at pretty much every gas station and Walmart etc around here. Bulky but I do use them when cooking on a portable stainless steel stove I have for camping. Good for portable heaters too but they do produce carbon monoxide.

White gas stoves and lanterns I used for years when camping but the fuel is about $15 per gallon now! And dangerous.

Small 1lb propane tanks are expensive, try $6 for one at a nearby Walgreens here. About $3.50 each at Walmart or Menard's Lumber, ridiculuos.

I have an assortment of propane lanterns and cookstoves these days, less messy than white gas.

Alcohol on the other hand can be found in every single drug store, major grocery store, and the dollar stores.

No. 231     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 9:37 PM     
yeah, dont buy those little tanks, have 4 100 pound tanks I fill with 75 pounds liquid, one will last you dang near all winter, for most motorhome's
that is. use a dearborn heater with a propane morphis, never use the furnace
plus get the propane in bulk at less than a dollar a pound, or less than 3 dollars a gallon bulk, 500 pound perm. tank around 2 dollars a gallon or less
plus have a fitting to fill the little 1 pound bottles but never use it any more. still smilin, good stuff here
No. 232     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 9:50 PM     
I have the little adapter for refilling the 1lb bottles. I do do that for camping lanterns and stoves.

Yeah for a camper I would definitely use big refillable tanks.
No. 233     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 9:51 PM     
YoungAndChristian52 wrote:



Also, Stormchaser, whats the best kind of survival equipment for a mudslide that you can recommend?


A helicopter?


Welcome to the site. I'm not sure what kind of survival gear would be handy in a mudslide. Maybe a good first-aid kit if you survive it.
No. 234     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 7, 2015 at 11:41 PM     
Just ordered 4 #10 cans of food.

1 can of powdered whole eggs. About 108 eggs. This will last for 6 months once opened but my last can lasted about a year and a half with no ill effects.

1 can of dehydrated mixed red & green bell peppers dices. I got this for mixing with Omelets, chili, and whatever else I can think of. These should last a long time before I use them up.

1 can of buttered mashed potatoes. They were 50% off.

1 can of 6 grain rolled cereal. A mixture of Hard white wheat, hard red wheat, oats, hulled barley, triticale and sunflower seeds. A healthy morning mix of grains and can use them for making cookies, granola bars too.
No. 235     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 8, 2015 at 6:19 AM     
I re-fueled the toilet paper heater a number of times to see how long it would last. I really don't know because I fell asleep and it kept on going.

m The flame did get smaller over time though and the top of the toilet paper eventually all charred black but it did not produce any smoke and was just black on top just like a wick gets in an oil lamp.

I just added the last of the alcohol to it. I think grand total this thing must burn for at least 6 hours or more on a quart. And it's smokeless too.

A medal to whomever came up with this ingenious survival trick!
No. 236     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 8, 2015 at 8:13 AM     
Ok I decided to get brave and try some 91% alcohol I happened to have on hand for First Aid purposes.

This higher potency alcohol has only 9% water in it. The flames were much higher, up to a foot tall, and more yellow, hotter too.

Definitely have to be more careful using this stronger stuff. It seems to burn faster too.

I'm sure this will burn out quicker and burn the wick up faster too but if one needs more heat there you go. But be careful.

The flames seem too tall to safely do any cooking on it. I would go with the 70% stuff for that.
No. 237     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 13, 2015 at 9:57 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Just ordered 4 #10 cans of food.

1 can of powdered whole eggs. About 108 eggs. This will last for 6 months once opened but my last can lasted about a year and a half with no ill effects.

1 can of dehydrated mixed red & green bell peppers dices. I got this for mixing with Omelets, chili, and whatever else I can think of. These should last a long time before I use them up.

1 can of buttered mashed potatoes. They were 50% off.

1 can of 6 grain rolled cereal. A mixture of Hard white wheat, hard red wheat, oats, hulled barley, triticale and sunflower seeds. A healthy morning mix of grains and can use them for making cookies, granola bars too.


Ok it arrived today.

The eggs say they will last 1 year, without refrigeration.

I made some scrambled eggs and added some of the red & green bell peppers that came to it. Then doused it with Louisiana hot sauce. Tasted good!

I tried out the butter mashed potatoes, and they did taste like buttered potatoes, very quick and easy cooking too! Just add the powdered potatoes to boiling water and stir. Within a few seconds they are done.

All the cans pretty much say they are good for 1 year after opening, 20+ years if unopened and stored at 60 degrees or so.

Tomorrow morning i'll crack open the 6 grain rolled cereal and make it hot to see hot that tastes.
No. 238     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 14, 2015 at 8:04 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:



Can be set up in about 25 minutes and no piece weighs over 20 pounds. Expensive at the moment, but as they begin to be mass produced they expect the price to drop drastically.

http://www.patriotheadquarters.com/rapid-deployment-modules/


Very cool. I have been looking at various ideas for portable cabins/shelters for a number of years now. For setting up semi-long term on one or more of my rural properties for 30 days or so at a time.

A few companies sell plans on how to make some.

When I was 18 or so I worked for an Aluminum Awning Manufacturing Company but we also made these portable office buildings that setup and installed inside Factories.

One we installed in the Wrigley's Spearment Gum Factory in Chicago.

We would make up the 4'x8' sheets up at our shop, frame them, wire them up with electrical outlets, install paneling on both sides, inject foam insulation into the walls with a machine which soundproofed and insulated them, etc.

Then we would load all the prefabbed slabs onto a flatbed truck and haul them to the customer's location and set them all up.

We would squeeze them together using pipe clamps then nail or screw everything together.

Of course such modular offices are available through the mail now but cost $$$.

Anyway I have been toying with the idea of making a portable one that fits on a 4x8 foot flatbed trailer. Many of the pieces would have piano type hinges and unfold. I would use a 2" wall thickness and foam insulation installed in the walls, the prefabbed foam panels you see at the lumber store.

The floor would be thicker of course.

Would probably use 1/4" luan plywood on the outside since it's lightweight. Waterproofed somehow of course with layers of marine epoxy or something, even polyurethane varnish then paint. Inside could use 1/4" luan plywood as well or maybe paneling.

Wall sheets could be 2 x 6 or 3 x 7' pieces for easier handling than 4x8 size when setting up.

Roof could be canvas with brass grommets along the edge, then elastic bungee cords which hold it down along the outside edges. I saw this method on some hunting cabin plans sold out there.

Roof supports could be pvc pipes or lightweight wood pre-arched which secure to the sidewalls somehow.

Opening in the wall or roof for a Stovejack of course and install a small woodstove or better yet a Military Surplus multifuel HM-45 or HM-51 Tent Stove. Or one of the small hunting ones from Cabela's
No. 239     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 14, 2015 at 3:26 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Just ordered 4 #10 cans of food.

1 can of powdered whole eggs. About 108 eggs. This will last for 6 months once opened but my last can lasted about a year and a half with no ill effects.

1 can of dehydrated mixed red & green bell peppers dices. I got this for mixing with Omelets, chili, and whatever else I can think of. These should last a long time before I use them up.

1 can of buttered mashed potatoes. They were 50% off.

1 can of 6 grain rolled cereal. A mixture of Hard white wheat, hard red wheat, oats, hulled barley, triticale and sunflower seeds. A healthy morning mix of grains and can use them for making cookies, granola bars too.


Ok it arrived today.

The eggs say they will last 1 year, without refrigeration.

I made some scrambled eggs and added some of the red & green bell peppers that came to it. Then doused it with Louisiana hot sauce. Tasted good!

I tried out the butter mashed potatoes, and they did taste like buttered potatoes, very quick and easy cooking too! Just add the powdered potatoes to boiling water and stir. Within a few seconds they are done.

All the cans pretty much say they are good for 1 year after opening, 20+ years if unopened and stored at 60 degrees or so.

Tomorrow morning i'll crack open the 6 grain rolled cereal and make it hot to see hot that tastes.


Do you regularly eat this food? I have used some up on camping and/or hunting excursions. Otherwise, I rarely ever open any except to try it and see what it taste like. All that I currently have are individually packaged per meal for one or two. Thus all is not exposed when I open the bulk container itself.
No. 240     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 14, 2015 at 4:37 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Do you regularly eat this food? I have used some up on camping and/or hunting excursions. Otherwise, I rarely ever open any except to try it and see what it taste like. All that I currently have are individually packaged per meal for one or two. Thus all is not exposed when I open the bulk container itself.


No, but I like to have it on hand, "just in case".

The powdered Eggs are just that, 100% powdered whole Eggs, NO other ingredients, NO preservatives!

Last can I had and opened lasted me 2 years UN refrigerated with no ill effects.

The red and green bell peppers have no other ingredients of preservatives either, just plain bell peppers. The nutrient content of them however is way down compared to fresh peppers which i grow and eat too. That must be due to the dehydration process which affects different veggies in different ways. I bought this for quick adding to Omelets, soups, etc. if I don't happen to have any fresh ones on hand.

The 6 grain rolled oats have no preservatives either. they are just 6 different kinds of grains "rolled" by a wheel. I just bought a small #10 can and wanted to try out how they taste before ordering a bulk bag or 6 gallon pail. I intended to use them in bread recipes and cookies too not just for a hot cereal.

The, "Butter Mashed Potatoes" are a different story. it is a, "prepared food" which means all kinds of various additives and ingredients are in it. I got it because it was cheap, 50% off! Plus instant potatoes do cook quickly VERY quickly! just add it to boiling water, mix, and in a few seconds they are done! Got it more of a convenience item and because of the price.

Some long term storage foods such as veggies or fruits are 100% food, no preservatives, no additives, nothing extra, just dried.

Others, especially, "meals" have all kinds of stuff in them.

You have to read the ingredients list before ordering...
No. 241     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 14, 2015 at 5:10 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:
Others, especially, "meals" have all kinds of stuff in them.

You have to read the ingredients list before ordering...


Other than maybe some fatty acid emulsifiers and salt, there are no more additives in my meal packs other than what you might find in a daily vitamin. Otherwise, it is simply dehydrated or freeze dried food in a sealed packet often with an oxygen absorber. You do not want to eat that.
No. 242     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 14, 2015 at 5:42 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
Others, especially, "meals" have all kinds of stuff in them.

You have to read the ingredients list before ordering...


Other than maybe some fatty acid emulsifiers and salt, there are no more additives in my meal packs other than what you might find in a daily vitamin. Otherwise, it is simply dehydrated or freeze dried food in a sealed packet often with an oxygen absorber. You do not want to eat that.


I like to try out the products I intend to buy in larger quantities first in a #10 can.

Reason being the smaller #2.5 cans are not that economical.

If I like what I taste in the #10 can I will consider buying more in #10 cans, a Superpail, or 25-50 lb bags which i would subdivide into Mylar bags, oxygen absorber, seal with an iron, and place into pails, etc.

Currently the only thing I have in bulk is rice and flour. Better than nothing and it's a start.
No. 243     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 14, 2015 at 6:23 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
Others, especially, "meals" have all kinds of stuff in them.

You have to read the ingredients list before ordering...


Other than maybe some fatty acid emulsifiers and salt, there are no more additives in my meal packs other than what you might find in a daily vitamin. Otherwise, it is simply dehydrated or freeze dried food in a sealed packet often with an oxygen absorber. You do not want to eat that.


I like to try out the products I intend to buy in larger quantities first in a #10 can.

Reason being the smaller #2.5 cans are not that economical.

If I like what I taste in the #10 can I will consider buying more in #10 cans, a Superpail, or 25-50 lb bags which i would subdivide into Mylar bags, oxygen absorber, seal with an iron, and place into pails, etc.

Currently the only thing I have in bulk is rice and flour. Better than nothing and it's a start.


I understand.

Lately I have been requesting samples before buying. Wise is the only one to send me a sample thus far. They appear to be a leader in the industry and provide a high quality nutritional product. Appear to also be high priced when compared to others. But it seems in this industry you get what you pay for.
No. 244     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 14, 2015 at 6:32 PM     
BTW - I finally purchased a FoodSaver vacuum sealer.
No. 245     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 1:54 PM     
Ok today I mounted and hooked up the 3 Solar Panel kit I got on sale from Harbor Freight a couple months ago in January.

I had a special coupon in the mail and got the whole kit for only $130.

They often sell this same kit for $200.

It came with 3 - 15 Watt Amorphous Silicon glass Solar Panels which produce about 1 amp each even on cloudy days for a total of 45 watts.

Although they are large for 15watt panels compared to mono or polycrystalline panels they do produce good power even when the sun is behind clouds. Which is one reason I got them.

It also came with a fairly sturdy pvc pipe mounting frame, bolts and wingnuts to assembly it with, as well as to mount the panels to.

This frame makes the solar panels semi-portable and you can stand it up in your backyard, outside your camper or tent, etc. it has 2 legs for adjusting it to 2 different anglers towards the sun.

Came with 2 - 12volt compact flourescent bulbs, sockets, etc.

Also a charge controller with LED voltage readout which also has 2 - 12volt cigarette lighter outlets for plugging in 12volt accessories such as a small inverter, fan, etc.

Then there are numerous small outlets for 3, 6, 9 volt accessories as well as a USB charging port for plugging in a cord to charge your cellphone, etc. Good thinking on their part for that one.

All the wiring and cables, plugs.

Took me a few hours to assemble it all and then haul it up to the roof and mount it, then run wiring inside to hookup to the 7 marine deep cycle batteries I am using.

it works! Although I already have a few solar panels of various types once I hooked it up I saw my voltmeter jump up a few notches pretty quick indicating it is charging.

Here is the kit I bought:

http://www.harborfreight.com/45-watt-solar-panel-kit-68751-8527.html


No. 246     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 2:04 PM     
I had bought one of their single panels years ago and it is still doing fine.

On sale now:

http://www.harborfreight.com/15-watt-12-volt-solar-panel-96418.html

So now I have a total of 4 of these Amorphous panels.

That is in addition to 2 - 20watt and 2 - 50watt polycrystalline panels I have.

Plus a 60 watt home made panel I made years ago.

I still have enough solar cells to make 5 more home made 60 watt polycrystalline panels which hopefully I will get around to finishing at least some of those this summer/fall.

So right now I am producing about 210watts total (I still need to mount one of my 50watt panels I am not using yet, that will give me 260 watts total when that one is mounted).

No. 247     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 7:53 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:
So now I have a total of 4 of these Amorphous panels.



I have like 6 solar panels in operation for myself.

I also custom designed a portable solar generator package(panel, powerpack, charge controller, and inverter) with off the shelf components. Have sold quite a few.
No. 249     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 8:06 PM     
This is my most popular package with some differences in the powerpack and/or panel depending on what is available at the time. That folding panel as shown has become difficult to locate in stock and/or too costly for most buyers. Most opt for a fixed frame panel.

Weighs just a little over 30 pounds and has a small footprint. About 13" long, 9" wide, and 12" high.



In bright sunlight, that little panel will fully charge the powerpack in about 10 hours:

No. 250     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 8:21 PM     
I have recently read that more than food, shelter, clothing and/or money, the biggest issue in disasters and societal crashes has been falling prey to illness and disease. Most are not prepared for and/or have the knowledge for such no matter how much they have planned and/or prepared otherwise.
No. 251     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 8:39 PM     
Gave one of my Coleman 4 man tents away today. My niece wanted to borrow one. I had a brand new one still in the box that I simply gave her.

Often I do not have brand new ones on hand. I sell the things online and they are most often drop shipped directly from the source to my buyer. But early this year when the price was really low on them, I had a couple shipped directly to me.
No. 252     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 8:49 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
So now I have a total of 4 of these Amorphous panels.



I have like 6 solar panels in operation for myself.

I also custom designed a portable solar generator package(panel, powerpack, charge controller, and inverter) with off the shelf components. Have sold quite a few.


What wattage or amperage are your panels?

I have a 1,000watt (2,000watts peak) modified sinewave inverter.

I did have a 1,200 watt (3,000watts peak) inverter but sold it some time ago.

And a small 120watt (200watt peak) for small loads like my laptop charger and a light, cellphone charger, etc.

Eventually when I can afford it I want to get a true sinewave inverter.

And a larger home commercial gridtie inverter.

I have a 7amp charge controller, and another that came with these 3 panels.

Plus a 30 amp charge controller I have yet to hook up and use. I'll have to once I add more panels.

Need to make up a fuse panel for installing fuses for each panel. I'll install that in my shed. I'm going with plain old AGC glass fuses, because they are cheap!

Bought a gallon of Distilled Water today to check and add water to any of these 7 Marine Deep Cycle batteries that may be low. Will do that this week sometime.
No. 253     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 9:00 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

I have recently read that more than food, shelter, clothing and/or money, the biggest issue in disasters and societal crashes has been falling prey to illness and disease. Most are not prepared for and/or have the knowledge for such no matter how much they have planned and/or prepared otherwise.


Look at what is going on in Sao Paulo, Brazil with their water shortage:

http://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/feb/25/sao-paulo-brazil-failing-megacity-water-crisis-rationing

They need armed Guards to accompany the water trucks. People are acting like animals and going crazy there.
No. 254     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 9:18 PM     
I am quickly learning to stock up on "Wet Wipes". They are worth gold in a survival situation when there is no water.

And I keep and use them at work to freshen up after a sweaty bike ride or walk to work.

I think I will start buying the bulk packs at Dollar General later this week. They can be great Barter material in emergencies. Almost bought more today but not enough room on my bike. I had to get some Groceries.

I keep a few gallons of plain Bleach at home for disinfecting water in an emergency. But I still need to get a Berkey water filter for serious filtering.

I want to pick up one of those, "Survival Straws" to keep in my Backpack for emergencies.

I live 1 block from a creek so water is not a problem here unless that dries up. but then I could go 1 mile west to the big Fox River which starts in Wisconsin and flows down through Town here.
No. 255     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 9:20 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Gave one of my Coleman 4 man tents away today. My niece wanted to borrow one. I had a brand new one still in the box that I simply gave her.

Often I do not have brand new ones on hand. I sell the things online and they are most often drop shipped directly from the source to my buyer. But early this year when the price was really low on them, I had a couple shipped directly to me.


I have so many Tents I lost track of what I have, lol.

I sell dropshipped tents as well.

No. 256     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 15, 2015 at 9:30 PM     
Last year when we had a power outage at work that lasted for more than a few hours life suddenly becomes difficult.

In a 4 story office building housing 300 people and visitors the toilets quickly become uh stinky and full.

Water does not work on the upper floors because the pumps are not running because there is no electricity.

They have no backup generator either.

The emergency lights in the stairwells and bathrooms only work for 30 minutes, that's it.

We had to set out lit flashlights in all the washrooms and stairwells so people could see where they were going.

The building quickly starts becoming very hot because the HVAC system does not work when there is no power.

The building is half glass, half concrete. It turns into a giant Solar Oven!

So people started leaving work early and going home once their laptop batteries and UPS's failed.

Or going to Restaurants which had power until ours was restored.
No. 257     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 21, 2015 at 9:58 PM     
I just ordered a black folding metal basket that fits on the side of my rear bike carrier.

Got it through Amazon for only $20.99 and free shipping. Wally World and Target sometimes sell these too.

http://www.amazon.com/Wald-Folding-Bicycle-Basket-12-75/dp/B0012DZEBY/ref=pd_rhf_ee_p_img_1



Dimensions are:

Top to bottom: 8 5/8"
Front to back: 12 3/8"
Side of bike, out: 7 3/8"

I got it for carrying groceries primarily but it could also carry a laptop bag, small backpack, Csmping gear, whatever.

A full sized grocery bag fits in it perfectly. It folds up out of the way close to the bike frame at only 1" deep when not in use.

I'll likely add hose clamps to attach it to the frame like others have suggested. I know i'll be carrying a lot of weight in it from time to time.

I'll get another one for the other side some other time.

Is a Bicycle considered, "Survival Gear"?

You betcha!
No. 258     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 32   on  Mar 21, 2015 at 10:38 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:
Is a Bicycle considered, "Survival Gear"?

You betcha!


LOL. I think so. My mountain bike is a military issue model. Same brand they issue to the Marines and some elite forces.
No. 259     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  Mar 22, 2015 at 2:41 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I just ordered a black folding metal basket that fits on the side of my rear bike carrier.

Got it through Amazon for only $20.99 and free shipping. Wally World and Target sometimes sell these too.

http://www.amazon.com/Wald-Folding-Bicycle-Basket-12-75/dp/B0012DZEBY/ref=pd_rhf_ee_p_img_1



Dimensions are:

Top to bottom: 8 5/8"
Front to back: 12 3/8"
Side of bike, out: 7 3/8"

I got it for carrying groceries primarily but it could also carry a laptop bag, small backpack, Csmping gear, whatever.

A full sized grocery bag fits in it perfectly. It folds up out of the way close to the bike frame at only 1" deep when not in use.

I'll likely add hose clamps to attach it to the frame like others have suggested. I know i'll be carrying a lot of weight in it from time to time.

I'll get another one for the other side some other time.

Is a Bicycle considered, "Survival Gear"?

You betcha!


Bought a set of these several years ago after seeing them on Kent's bike. Cheaper than you did, but again, it was several years ago. A pain to but on but very useful once they were installed.
No. 260     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  Mar 22, 2015 at 3:10 AM     
Incidentally, I know many of you survival gear people will be interested in Prepper Camp (Sept. NC), where much survival gear will be displayed, discussed, and demonstrated. Check out my announcement thread on the Reference forum.

HALF-OFF TICKET PRICES UNTIL APRIL 15!
No. 261     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 22, 2015 at 3:02 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Bought a set of these several years ago after seeing them on Kent's bike. Cheaper than you did, but again, it was several years ago. A pain to but on but very useful once they were installed.


There were other cheaper similar brands for wire baskets on Amazon such as Sunlight, Avenir, and Bell but I did not like the ratings people were leaving on Amazon for them.

This Waldon brand seemed to have the most 5 star ratings overall, and a lot of them despite it's few minor complaints which are easily fixed with some small hose clamps. Installing a bunch of the hose clamps like others recommend on any wire basket in addition to making it hold more weight and the mounting sturdier can help prevent people from stealing it too. Who would take the time to unscrew 6 or more of those hose clamps? Possibly a determined thief if they had enough time but if the bike is in public view they are likely to pass on it.

No. 262     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 33   on  Mar 24, 2015 at 6:14 PM     
BTW - This is North American Bicycle Week. I have met a local photographer who is a bicyclist, and she is the host of a local riding club. She has invited me to ride in events in Detroit this Friday and Saturday. Not sure if my broken foot is up to it. Plan to do a short run this evening and see what happens. Although simply cycling may be less strain in the foot than running and/or walking.

But this nice weather has really got me to chomping at the bit to simply get out there and run. One of my favorite things to do.

May only attend the after ride events Friday and Saturday.
No. 263     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 26, 2015 at 6:26 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

BTW - This is North American Bicycle Week. I have met a local photographer who is a bicyclist, and she is the host of a local riding club. She has invited me to ride in events in Detroit this Friday and Saturday. Not sure if my broken foot is up to it. Plan to do a short run this evening and see what happens. Although simply cycling may be less strain in the foot than running and/or walking.

But this nice weather has really got me to chomping at the bit to simply get out there and run. One of my favorite things to do.

May only attend the after ride events Friday and Saturday.


Would you like to borrow my bullet proof vest while you pedal through Detroit?
No. 264     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 26, 2015 at 6:33 PM     
The Bicycle metal basket came yesterday, I mounted it today after work.

Looks like they made some improvements after seeing certain complaints on reviews on Amazon.

Now it comes with 2 different sized mounting clips, 2 small ones for thin bike racks, and 2 large ones for thicker, larger bike racks.

It looks like it is pretty sturdy and mounting it only required the 2 smaller clamps for the top and a U shaped clamp which holds the lower part in place.

Didn't take me long to mount it, it's on and folds up compactly against the frame to only 1" thick when not in use.

Whomever designed this deserves a medal.

This weekend I will test it out with a bag of groceries ha!
No. 265     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 34   on  Mar 26, 2015 at 8:10 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

BTW - This is North American Bicycle Week. I have met a local photographer who is a bicyclist, and she is the host of a local riding club. She has invited me to ride in events in Detroit this Friday and Saturday. Not sure if my broken foot is up to it. Plan to do a short run this evening and see what happens. Although simply cycling may be less strain in the foot than running and/or walking.

But this nice weather has really got me to chomping at the bit to simply get out there and run. One of my favorite things to do.

May only attend the after ride events Friday and Saturday.


Would you like to borrow my bullet proof vest while you pedal through Detroit?


LOL. Thank you. But I have one given to me by the local police academy.
No. 266     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 34   on  Mar 26, 2015 at 9:11 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I'm quite confident these little emergency alcohol heaters could be used in a car if stranded in subzero weather, WITH care of course!





I have one of these back packable solo stoves. Have been looking at it thinking about trying the tissue/alcohol idea with it. But there is no way I can make an entire roll of paper fit in it. But it does seem I have one of the slightly larger models around here. Typically you just fill these with dry sticks and twigs and they work well for heat and/or cooking.


No. 267     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 34   on  Mar 26, 2015 at 9:16 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Gave one of my Coleman 4 man tents away today. My niece wanted to borrow one. I had a brand new one still in the box that I simply gave her.

Often I do not have brand new ones on hand. I sell the things online and they are most often drop shipped directly from the source to my buyer. But early this year when the price was really low on them, I had a couple shipped directly to me.


In have so many Tents I lost track of what I have, lol.

I sell dropshipped tents as well.



Some time ago I gave all the old tents away. Think I have at least 3 brand new ones here right now, and one used back pack pop-up tent. Actually, two of them are portable hunting blinds, but can suffice as tents.
No. 268     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 34   on  Mar 26, 2015 at 9:29 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:
I have one of these back packable solo stoves.


BTW - I just read that this little stove was the winner of the 2014 Gear of the Year award and is the #1 wood-burning backpacking stove recommended by Backpacker Magazine and serious survivalists including Discovery Channel's Matt Graham.
No. 269     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 28, 2015 at 7:18 PM     
Ok today I tried out the wire basket. Here is my pack mule about an hour and a half ago outside of Dollar General with a full load on.

The black bag in the center is a 2' long leather Duffle or Tote bag filled to the brim with groceries and new undershirts, underwear, and socks just purchased. Also some items I purchased at Autozone. I strapped it down to my heavy duty rear rack carrier using 3 new bungee cords.

The folding wire basket on the lower right is holding a green heavy duty shopping bag from Woodman's I saved years ago. Those new nylon bags with carrying handles stores have been selling lately at the checkout counter. I have a few more from Dollar general and Aldi's too.

Anyway I packed that with all the canned goods, Juices, drinks, etc. All the heavy stuff. I wanted to see how it held up with a lot of weight in it. It did just fine.

The yellow plastic bag on the upper right was the extra stuff I couldn't fit in the other 2 bags. So I just quadruple bagged it and strapped it down on top of the wire basket with 1 bungee cord.

I had to lay my bike down on it's left side on the ground in order to get my right leg over the crossbar, lol. With all that weight on the bike was a little unstable until you are on it and pedaling. 2 baskets on both sides with the weight evenly distributed would make things easier.

Anyway once I got rolling everything was fine and I hardly even knew I was pedaling more weight.

Will definitely order the basket for the left side soon.

No. 270     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 52   on  Mar 28, 2015 at 10:09 PM     
I am trying the alcohol heater can trick but this time using a looser roll of toilet paper to see if it burns longer. The can now holds more alcohol.

If you live in norther climates I would recommend pre-stuffing an old can with the roll of toilet paper and keeping an unopened bottle of 70% Isopropyl alcohol separate.

The alcohol bottles are sealed with a seal under the cap you must pull off the first time you open it. Unsealed in the trunk of your car and out of the way in a safe place it should not leak.

The quart bottles are more economical but they do sell the smaller bottles too.

Incidentally alcohol is available by the gallon in paint stores or large lumber or home centers that have a well stocked paint section.

It is used for thinning or cleaning up paint but is also sold for use in "Marine Stoves". That's right many Boaters use special Marine Cookstoves which burn alcohol for fuel. The reason they do is they are MUCH safer than LP bottled propane gas, or coleman liquid gas which could blow your boat to kingdom come if something went wrong.

LP gas "sinks" and is heavier than air which is why it can be so dangerous in boats. Any leak would sink to the bilge and accumulate there and fill the whole boat up with LP gas fumes until a spark ignites it then boom goes your whole boat!

Some boaters do use LP gas anyway, but it is more dangerous.

Alcohol is relatively safe and does not emit carbon monoxide. It is not really explosive under normal circumstances. You can extinguish the flame by simply covering the can with a pie tin.

If you really want to get fancy you can buy the appropriate sized empty paint can complete with lid in a paint store. You can then simply slide the lid over the flame if you want to put it out.
No. 271     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 34   on  Apr 1, 2015 at 12:26 AM     
Anyone familiar with Augason Farms emergency food packs/pails? I have been reading that short of opting and paying top dollar for Wise brand, they are likely the next best value.
No. 272     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 3, 2015 at 9:56 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Anyone familiar with Augason Farms emergency food packs/pails? I have been reading that short of opting and paying top dollar for Wise brand, they are likely the next best value.


Never heard of that one.

I am familiar with the WISE brand and some of the Distributors I order from sell WISE foods.

No. 273     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 3, 2015 at 10:08 PM     
I did some checking around on the Internet and found out the 12 Amphour SLA batteries I ordered for my electric bike kit should last about 10-15 miles without pedaling and 20-30 miles with pedaling.

They last about 400-500 discharge-charge cycles. So a couple of years.

Obviously that would depend on a number of factors such as motor size, bike weight, rider weight, road conditions, tire type, etc.

Here are the batteries I ordered a few months ago. They are specifically designed for deep cycle use. The 12 Amphour ones I have are a popular size.

I could double up and get another set of 3 batteries and wire them in parallel with the 3 I have and that would get me all the way to my destination and back without having to charge them up on a client's site.

I could easily do that since they are stored in a heavy duty nylon bag. But lugging them in and out everyday would be a pain. unless they have an outdoor outlet I could plug into.

I found out the cost to recharge 3 of these batteries is about .10 per charge. That's right, TEN CENTS!

Now you see why I am looking at this as a means of transportation at least some of the time.

Then just take the Train during bad weather.

http://www.atbatt.com/csb-battery-12v-12ah-deep-cycle-sla-battery.asp

No. 274     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 34   on  Apr 4, 2015 at 12:34 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I did some checking around on the Internet and found out the 12 Amphour SLA batteries I ordered for my electric bike kit should last about 10-15 miles without pedaling and 20-30 miles with pedaling.


The most recent batteries I checked out for electric bikes were lithium.
No. 275     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 4, 2015 at 12:53 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I did some checking around on the Internet and found out the 12 Amphour SLA batteries I ordered for my electric bike kit should last about 10-15 miles without pedaling and 20-30 miles with pedaling.


The most recent batteries I checked out for electric bikes were lithium.


Obviously the Lithium batteries are the better option. They hold a charge longer and are good for 3-4 X as many deep cycles. But for us po folk the SLA's are our first choice. These batteries do not last as long as the lithium, but they are designed for electric scooters, bikes, wheelchairs, etc. and similar electric utility type movers. They are deep cycle, unlike standard sla batteries like those in emergency lights for example.

They will do for now, as soon as I get everything mounted!

(Still have to get a new rear wheel, axle bent, spoke broke wheel, it wobbles but still rides smooth. Have been holding off on a new one because it seems ok for now.

But when I go to add the weight of the batteries, 27 lbs or so onto the rear bike rack that wheel may wobble a bit more or break more spokes.
No. 276     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 4, 2015 at 6:36 PM     
I just finished hooking up my 2,000 Watt Inverter to my 7 deep cycle battery bank.

I used some heavy 2/0 gauge battery cable wire to hook it up.

I still don't have a heavy duty fuse for it but it IS fused inside.

Better to have an external heavy duty fuse though as well.

I will have to experiment to see what kind of loads it will handle.

I tried a portable fan so far, works fine with that.
No. 277     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 5, 2015 at 4:34 PM     
I finally mounted 2 - 50 Watt Solar Panels to the roof.

They produce almost 3 Amps each @ 18vdc.

After running all the wiring and hooking it up to a 30 Amp Charge Controller I bought months ago I saw the voltmeter on my Battery bank jump up pretty quickly, until the sun went on the other side of the shed, lol.

It was a productive day.

SO that makes 3 - 15 watt Amorphous panels mounted.

Plus these.

I still have 2 - 20 Watt panels to mount, plus 1 more 15 Watt Amorphous and a 60 Watt home made panel.

(And have to finish making and assembling all the solar cells I have to make 5 more 60 Watt panels.)
No. 278     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 23, 2015 at 1:32 AM     
Expandinding on my off the grid system I ordered this contraption the other day off Amazon. It heats up 20oz of water for making coffee, tea, soup, noodles, etc. It runs on 12vdc via a cigarette lighter plug. The bad reviews I read were the cigarette lighter plug burning out so i'll chop that off and hard wire it to the batteries with a fuse instead. It will heat water hot enough for coffee in about 10 minutes and actually boil water in about 30 minutes. I wanted something economical on energy usage for minimal cooking needs. This only draws 7 amps (85 Watts) but would use far less energy than a 600-1100 watt hot plate! And was only $11 something plus shipping so not quite $20.

http://www.amazon.com/Roadpro-12V-Hot-Pot-oz/dp/B000667QL4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1430195106&sr=8-1&keywords=road+pro+hot+pot

No. 279     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 27, 2015 at 11:59 PM     
Ok at 11:44pm I filled it to capacity, 20oz and plugged it in. It has a white LED that lights up the water inside so you can see if there is water in it and if it is boiling. My battery bank was at 12.34 volts when I plugged it in and dropped to 12.12 volts after plugging it in. My batteries were only partially charged today and not full so am operating on half full batteries or so.

It comes with 2 cups, one smaller cap which snaps on the top and another bigger cup with a handle for drinking which fits over that. Instructions say to put them both on while heating water.

it also came with a metal "L" shaped bracket which could be mounted to a wall such as a camper or boat cabin. You then slide the hotpot onto the bracket which looks like it would stay in place even during pounding seas, etc. Since one side of the bracket is long you could simply slip it under a few books or something heavy to temporarily hold it in place.
No. 280     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 28, 2015 at 12:06 AM     
Ok after 15 minutes I checked the water and it is now warm and you can feel the upper side of the hotpot getting warm. The water was very cold when I first put it in.

The instructions say to be sure and only use it while running the engine otherwise it will run the battery down.

Obviously that doesn't apply when using 7 deep cycle marine batteries like I am using so we can ignore that for now.

Obviously water would heat up MUCH faster when a car is running producing 13.8vdc vs the 12.12vdc it is receiving at the moment.

During the day when my solar panels are charging the batteries up water would heat up faster as well so tomorrow will try it during the day too.

Am waiting to make some Hot Choklit and then maybe some Ramen Noodles afterwards assuming it will boil water like it and the reviews say.
No. 281     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 28, 2015 at 12:23 AM     
After 30 minutes small bubbles have formed in the water, the stages fo pre-boiling. And the water is now steaming hot.

Am letting it continue warming though.
No. 282     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 28, 2015 at 1:07 AM     
After 45 minutes the water was boiling, not violently but large bubbles were coming off the heating element. Obviously in a car or when my solar panels are charging or with a full battery water would boil within the 30 minutes others have stated.

But I was not looking for speed with this thing, just that it would do it! Which it does. A handy little device to have in a car when traveling or boat.

So I made Hot Choklit and some instant Butter Mashed Potatoes.

I know, strange combo but I had a taste for both.

After pouring a bit of the water into a cup for my Hot Choklit I noticed the remaining water started boiling violently. Have to be sure and unplug it when done. There is no on/off switch. Although there is supposedly an over temperature device inside that will shut the power off when too hot.
No. 283     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Apr 30, 2015 at 4:04 AM     

1 can of 6 grain rolled cereal. A mixture of Hard white wheat, hard red wheat, oats, hulled barley, triticale and sunflower seeds. A healthy morning mix of grains and can use them for making cookies, granola bars too.


Ok finally made some of this. It is quite good even plain it is far tastier than plain oatmeal!

It should make great granola bars and cookies too. I'm hooked!
No. 284     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  123john62   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  May 5, 2015 at 4:15 AM     

For real survivor vehicles or starting a new small farm or homestead there's nothing like a an old Toyota pick up with the 20R engine. Chain and not belt-driven, it will almost run forever, given oil and other liquid changes. The pick-ups with the later 22R engines, especially the first generation ones, are a close second choice.

No. 285     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 35   on  May 12, 2015 at 11:44 AM     
I got a new Taurus 738FS .380

And it is likely smaller than what you see displayed on your screen. Only a 2.84" barrel length, 5.25" overall length and weighs only 10.2 ounces:

No. 286     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 36   on  Jun 1, 2015 at 1:38 PM     
I posted this in the "Handguns" thread but have opted to share it here also.

I picked up a brand new AR15 tactical carbine/rifle today. Purchased a DPMS Panther Oracle AR15. She is pretty bare but optics ready, fires 223 Remington or 5.56 NATOs, 16" barrel, one 30rd mag, sports a 6-position stock, standard hand grip and trigger. Functions very simply and smoothly.

Even though I checked out some costing considerably less, I still consider this entry level. Got her for under $500. I have seen some quoted prices from $700 to $1200 depending on the accessories included and the mods that have been done. Being I am not that experienced with all the mods, I opted to go "bare" and add as I have time to check out and review accessories and mods I personally prefer. I have not yet tried, but it appears one of my existing lasers may fit the top front rail.

Reviews on this AR15 range from one extreme to the other. Just as many claiming to love it, it will be their only AR15 for life, it operates flawlessly regardless of available ammo, solid and reliable firearm, etc., as others simply calling it a piece of "junk".

I thoroughly looked this firearm over at the dealer and found none of the negative issues reviews reported. Not even the reports of a "sloppy" fitting and rattling stock to no positive safety did I find to be true. The most recent reviews I encountered were written in Jan 2014. Maybe the manufacture has added and/or improved those features since the first release of the firearm.

Here she is:

No. 287     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 36   on  Jun 4, 2015 at 10:07 AM     
Doing research for accessories and mods for my new AR15, I have learned one can essentially purchase all the parts online and build their own high quality AR15 at a fraction of the cost of purchasing an assembled top of the line model. Although I really like the one I just purchased, I may pursue building my own as time permits.
No. 288     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 36   on  Jun 4, 2015 at 10:12 AM     
BTW - One of the first mods I am doing to the AR15, in addition to installing optics, is installing a brass catcher. With a 30 round magazine there are simply too many spent cartridges to have to take the time to pick up after just shooting for a little while.
No. 289     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 36   on  Jun 17, 2015 at 9:55 AM     
Over the years I have used a variety of alarms, locks, etc. on my windows and have even considered security bars/screens. Here is an article I found interesting on using window films as a measure of alternative protection:

http://www.offthegridnews.com/self-defense/window-film-could-this-home-defense-method-help-you/
No. 290     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 7, 2015 at 1:16 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Doing research for accessories and mods for my new AR15, I have learned one can essentially purchase all the parts online and build their own high quality AR15 at a fraction of the cost of purchasing an assembled top of the line model. Although I really like the one I just purchased, I may pursue building my own as time permits.


No. 291     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 7, 2015 at 1:36 PM     
My latest toy is...

Alocs Alcohol Stove.

It is designed primarily for Backpacking but works great for emergency or survival situations too.

This thing is about as simple as you can get with no parts to wear out.

It will burn just about any type of Alcohol, Isopropyl, Methanol, Grain Alcohol.

Isopropyl Alcohol can be found in any Drug Store or large Dept store, even Dollar Stores like Dollar General and Family Dollar who both sell it here where I live.

Any Gas Sataion or Auto Parts store that sells Gas line antifreeze such as HEET or other brands. Can be found in large department stores and dollar stores as well. This type of Alcohol is Methanol.

Any Liquor store that sells, Grain alcohol such as Ever clear, etc.

I used 91% Isopropyl alcohol from Dollar General. It was way too potent of a flame so I added water to it to make it 70% strength or so. I think 70% or even 50% strength alcohol would be ideal.

Cost was less than $15.00 including the mini pot or pan stand you see. Shipping was free.



So far I have Cooked Pancakes, Scrambled Eggs, 6 Grain oatmeal, and instant mashed potatoes on it. It works really well and I'll definitely be bringing this baby with me on my next Backpacking trip.
No. 292     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 36   on  Jul 7, 2015 at 9:18 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I have been seeing videos lately for making a very cheap but effective emergency heater out of a can and a roll of toilet paper and 70% Isopropyl Alcohol.


I may have already mentioned this, but in a recent survival broadcast I heard on the radio, they stated one can take a can of oil packed tuna, poke a small hole in the top, insert something to act as a wick, light it and have heat for a couple to a few hours depending on the size of the can of tuna and the amount of oil in the can.
No. 293     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 7, 2015 at 10:35 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I have been seeing videos lately for making a very cheap but effective emergency heater out of a can and a roll of toilet paper and 70% Isopropyl Alcohol.


I may have already mentioned this, but in a recent survival broadcast I heard on the radio, they stated one can take a can of oil packed tuna, poke a small hole in the top, insert something to act as a wick, light it and have heat for a couple to a few hours depending on the size of the can of tuna and the amount of oil in the can.


Yep, already knew about that one.
No. 294     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 23, 2015 at 4:57 AM     
I finally installed the 2 - 20 Watt AltE Solar Panels I had bought last year onto the roof. I had them on the deck, they are getting more sun up on the roof now.

Just ordered 2 more generic Infinium brand 20 Watt Polycrystalline Solar panels too from another company on Amazon. These, like the other two I got on sale. They look about the same and are the same size. I tend to watch for deep discount sales on solar panels and buy them then. Ordered 2 more for only $32 each plus shipping. They regularly sold for $59. Many other companies sell them for even more.

These produce about 1.2amps each @ 18volts.

I debated on getting one big 100 watt panel but decided against it due to where I live and the possibility they could get damaged by the huge maple tree nearby, vandalism, etc. It's cheaper per watt to buy large panels, until you reach a certain size and they have to be shipped Truck Freight!

It is generally safer and smarter to use a bunch of smaller panels though that way if one gets damaged by a rock, bullet, tree, etc. you are not out a whole lot of money. If a large panel gets damaged...one panel can cost hundreds of $$.

When I move I may use bigger panels. We'll see.

Here's what the 20 Watters look like...

No. 295     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  Jul 23, 2015 at 11:24 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I finally installed the 2 - 20 Watt AltE Solar Panels I had bought last year onto the roof. I had them on the deck, they are getting more sun up on the roof now.

Just ordered 2 more generic Infinium brand 20 Watt Polycrystalline Solar panels too from another company on Amazon. These, like the other two I got on sale. They look about the same and are the same size. I tend to watch for deep discount sales on solar panels and buy them then. Ordered 2 more for only $32 each plus shipping. They regularly sold for $59. Many other companies sell them for even more.

These produce about 1.2amps each @ 18volts.

I debated on getting one big 100 watt panel but decided against it due to where I live and the possibility they could get damaged by the huge maple tree nearby, vandalism, etc. It's cheaper per watt to buy large panels, until you reach a certain size and they have to be shipped Truck Freight!

It is generally safer and smarter to use a bunch of smaller panels though that way if one gets damaged by a rock, bullet, tree, etc. you are not out a whole lot of money. If a large panel gets damaged...one panel can cost hundreds of $$.

When I move I may use bigger panels. We'll see.

Here's what the 20 Watters look like...



That looks very similar to the 20-watt panel I have mounted on a TV wall-mount for mobile use with my teardrop RV.
No. 296     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 26, 2015 at 3:33 PM     
While walking around downtown a little while ago I spotted a Bicycle in a Pawn Shop for only $59. Looks like a Road bike, thin tires so I would not be able to mount the electric motor on that one. Still would be great for trips though, just not dirt trails.

They are closed on Sundays but i'll check it out tomorrow when coming home on the bus, or later in the afternoon after I get home and get a nap since I am off work Monday.

Also saw 2 Huffy Mountain Bikes in good shape in a Christian Thrift Store. They are closed too. The price tags were facing the other way though so can't see them. Those the electric motor would fit on.

Looks like my next Bike will be used!
No. 297     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  Jul 26, 2015 at 5:47 PM     
Had an electric bike once (actually, still have it but the battery went bad and I didn't exchange it before the warranty ran out). It was awesome while it lasted and I rode it everywhere, even to and from the gym. Lost weight like it went out of style.
No. 298     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jul 29, 2015 at 11:32 AM     
Stormchaser wrote

That looks very similar to the 20-watt panel I have mounted on a TV wall-mount for mobile use with my teardrop RV.


Well the two solar panels I ordered just arrived twenty minutes ago via ups. They were well packed, double boxed in fact. With fragile packing tape covering all box seams.

I unpacked them, opened the junction boxes on the back. They had water resistant covers with a rubber gasket. But where you bring the wire in was just a notch cut in the side of the junction box.

My last two panels, a different brand had a plastic nut and rubber grommet to seal each wire.

No biggee, these are not ul listed, are designed for off grid use, and that's what they make rtv silicone caulk for!

I hooked the two wires up, then to the solar charge controller. And watched my voltmeter go DOWN as I hooked it up.

What the????

I I hooked a voltmeter up to the wires and discovered they have the + and - terminals mismarked inside the junction box!!! :icon_eek:

They were embossed into the plastic but had them reversed!

Again this is no bigger and for the thirty two dollars on sale they were still well worth it!

No problem, I simply reversed the wires and voila! They are working like a charm. These are rated at 1.2 amps each, slightly more than the 1.1 amps my other 20 watt panels are rated for.

Although i'll have to run them through an ammeter to prove that.

I did order a blue led 100 amp digital amp meter some time ago so I can measure overall performance and output of all panels at a glance.

Waiting on the shunt which I ordered separaretly, probably coming from China. Supposed to be here in about a week.

Anyway now I know why these panels were so marked down. Chinese quality control's blunder is their loss, my gain! :ban_dance: Who cares if the positive and negative is mismarked! Would have been nice to include a note warning you of such though!

Will still give them 5 stars, they work well!:party:
No. 299     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Aug 1, 2015 at 3:31 PM     
I took an opportunity today to increase survival skills.

I experienced a memory lapse forgetting that on Saturday the Open Krav Maga class starts an hour earlier than it does Mon-Thu. Thus I was too late to just walk in when I arrived. I thought no big deal, I have already drove all this way, I will stay and attend the MMA Fight class starting at top of the next hour. Lot of the same routines are taught except far more grappling on the floor than usual in an effort to pin or tap-out your opponent. Were as in Krav you display a punch or kick that would have likely disabled an opponent. Essentially got "kicked" out of class because I did not have the required gloves, shin guards and headgear. Mine are on order, but I thought I could borrow some from the school. But they said something about an insurance requirement stating that each student must now have their own such protective gear as the headgear.

That left weapons class. At the most only a groin cup would be required. There was a coach there from a local law enforcement instruction program teaching defense against knives and handguns. Was an informative and good hands on class. Although the knives used are steel, they do not have sharp blades and the handguns are "fake".
No. 300     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Aug 7, 2015 at 12:53 AM     
I needed some economical water-resistant junction boxes to mount to the back of the home made solar panels I have built and am building. This is where you make the connection of your wires to the tabs on the solar panel.

Commercial solar junction boxes or, "J-Boxes" as they are called in the Solar industry are ridiculously overpriced costing $15 to $20 each!

I needed something a lot cheaper than that!

Found these on Amazon for only $2.76 each + Free Shipping. I ordered 3 for now. They are waterproof, low profile, have 2 mounting tabs I can screw into the back of the plywood panels. I will order some screw Terminal strips separately and mount those inside of them. I'll likely mount the Schottky Diode in there too which prevents your battery from discharging through your solar panel at night. I already have those and they came with the Solar cell kits I ordered a few years back



It has a rubber "O" Ring Gasket that seals the rain out, at least in theory, we'll see.



http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PI6P3MG?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00

I also ordered 10 of these waterproof plastic cable glands for $2.83 + Free Shipping also. They are for running the solar wiring through into the boxes. They seal the rain and water out but let the cable in.

I'll have to drill 2 holes and mount 2 of them to each home made solar panel but that's pretty quick. They are only .283 cents each so cheap.



http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005FIWYX8?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00

No. 301     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Aug 7, 2015 at 1:01 AM     
I also ordered 2 of these larger waterproof boxes in case the other ones are too small. These have 4 mounting holes.

Even if I don't use these in the solar panel application i'll find some other electronic project use for them. These bigger ones were $3.59 each + Free shipping.



http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00PI6OYJE?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00
No. 302     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Aug 7, 2015 at 1:22 AM     
Ordered and received this Blue LED digital Amp Meter for monitoring the Amperage/Charging Current of all my Solar Panels. This meter will measure up to 100 Amps. You can pretty much get them in Blue, Red, Green, Yellow, but I just like Blue. This display is .56" high so a little over a half inch high. It was $8.97 + Free Shipping.



Here's the back of it along with the hookup diagram.



http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00C1ZPGRY?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00

Being it is an ampmeter, it needs an external 100amp, 75mv shunt which I had to order separaretly. I ordered it at the same time and it is finally on the way from Hong Kong. It was only $4.49 + Free Shipping. Shipping is slow but the price is right!

Once it arrives i'll hook it up and get to monitor the grand total of charging current of all my solar panels combined. Right now I just have a green digital voltmeter hooked up.



http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006Z94RWM?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o04_s00



No. 303     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Aug 17, 2015 at 7:26 PM     
No. 304     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Aug 20, 2015 at 8:39 AM     
The 5 grey water resistant boxes I posted earlier arrived from China in the Mail today. That was pretty quick considering they came from China.

Anyway they look pretty good and the price was right. . I think i'll go with the smaller boxes and use those on the back of the home made solar panels.

I'll use the 2 bigger ones for some other project.

Haven't received the black plastic weather nut fittings yet that i'm going to mount on these boxes. They are coming from a different supplier. From China as well I think.

Still waiting on that 100amp shunt from China for the digital meter. The deadline is in a few days and if I don't get it i'll have to file a claim with Amazon. It was only #4 something dollars so I wouldn't be out much. Being it's taking so long but it is so cheap I am willing to wait for it even if it takes 2 months!
No. 305     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 2, 2015 at 12:36 PM     
One of the Harbor Freight solar panels I bought about 7 years ago Failed. It was a single one and the first one I had bought.

It was one of those 15 watt amorphous ones. I took it apart removing all 36 screws that hold the plastic frame together.

I thought maybe the diode had burned out. No dice that wasn't it,

The edge of the panel is sealed with this really hard but flexible white caulking which keeps water out.

Whatever failed, maybe where a wire connects to the panel, it's embedded inside that caulk.

So I put all 36 screws back in and tossed it in the shed.

Maybe soemday when I have the time i'll dig it out and try stripping all that caulk away to see if I can find a break.

The polycrystalline panels I have from other companies have a 20-25 year warranty, assuming the companies are in business that long which is doubtful.

Hopefully the other 3 newer panels I have from Harbor Freight don't fail anytime soon.
No. 306     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  123john62   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Sep 2, 2015 at 6:05 PM     


Just bought used Panasonic Toughbook CF 19 for
$240. It sold for over $5400 retail when new
and well worth it too.
You can run a car over it and cause hardly a
dent. The case and frame is made out of expensive
and super strong magnesium alloy.
Water resistant, dust resistant and with
an LCD screen that flips over for use as a tablet.
A real survivalist's dream computer!


No. 307     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 2, 2015 at 6:47 PM     
123john62 wrote:



Just bought used Panasonic Toughbook CF 19 for
$240. It sold for over $5400 retail when new
and well worth it too.
You can run a car over it and cause hardly a
dent. The case and frame is made out of expensive
and super strong magnesium alloy.
Water resistant, dust resistant and with
an LCD screen that flips over for use as a tablet.
A real survivalist's dream computer!




Been eying used Toughbooks for several weeks now because of all of the above features you mentioned.

Seen some decent ones for as little as $100.

It is on my wishlist!
No. 308     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  123john62   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Sep 2, 2015 at 6:58 PM     


A decent Toughbook for only $100.
Where at?

No. 309     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 2, 2015 at 8:15 PM     
123john62 wrote:



A decent Toughbook for only $100.
Where at?



No operating system on that one.

The ones i've been eyeing are about $150-$200.

Also looking at a Military grade Laptop which is even tougher than Panasonic Toughbooks.

No. 310     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 2, 2015 at 9:03 PM     
No. 311     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  123john62   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Sep 3, 2015 at 10:17 AM     
Bullfighter wrote:
"No operating system on that one.

The ones i've been eyeing are about $150-$200.

Also looking at a Military grade Laptop which is even tougher than Panasonic Toughbooks."

Mine has Windows 7 and MS Office (Japanese language versions since it was purchased in Japan) newly installed By Panasonic on the refurbished computer. However, I'm planning to install Elementary OS (Linux) and use it as the main operating system.



No. 312     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 6, 2015 at 3:22 AM     
The shunt for the digital amp meter I ordered finally came in Sunday's Mail.



This must be the replacement they sent since the first one never arrived. It was shipped direct from Hong Kong china.

Monday when i'm off i'll see how accurate it is.
No. 313     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 8, 2015 at 9:59 AM     
Ok I hooked the blue digital ammeter up with the shunt. Of course it is cloudy and kinda dark right now so the solar panels are producing very little power, the ammeter says 1.1 amps.

Being this meter setup will read up to 99.9 amps it should handle all future solar/Wind Generator expansions

Will have to wait until the sun comes back out to get a good reading then compare it to my portable DMM which reads up to 10 amps.

I sure like the color blue in a digital readout though!
No. 314     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Sep 14, 2015 at 9:48 PM     
Purchased a new Mossberg 500 today with both the field and rifled barrel. Also included a scope. They offered me the same great price whether I opted for 12 gauge or 20 gauge. Being I already own a Remington 1100 12 gauge, I opted for the 20 in the Mossberg to provide me some long gun ammo flexibility, and be of a little less kick if my daughter decides to shoot a shotgun now and then.

No. 315     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Sep 15, 2015 at 8:22 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I sure like the color blue in a digital readout though!


The last Escort radar detector I purchased offered a choice of color for the LED display versus traditional red. I opted for blue. Pretty cool. When driving at night I prefer the blue, versus looking up and seeing red which mentally to me indicates "danger" or a "problem".
No. 316     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 16, 2015 at 8:36 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I sure like the color blue in a digital readout though!


The last Escort radar detector I purchased offered a choice of color for the LED display versus traditional red. I opted for blue. Pretty cool. When driving at night I prefer the blue, versus looking up and seeing red which mentally to me indicates "danger" or a "problem".


Studies have shown that the color' "Red" is the most stressful on the nervous system.

Red LED's tend to do just that to me, very annoying.

"Green" is the most calming.

I remember when my Dad's Panasonic CB radio the Red LED channel readout had some burned out digits after a number of years.

I found a match in "Green" and replaced it with that instead of red.

Looked much better!
No. 317     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Sep 16, 2015 at 10:35 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I sure like the color blue in a digital readout though!


The last Escort radar detector I purchased offered a choice of color for the LED display versus traditional red. I opted for blue. Pretty cool. When driving at night I prefer the blue, versus looking up and seeing red which mentally to me indicates "danger" or a "problem".


Studies have shown that the color' "Red" is the most stressful on the nervous system.

Red LED's tend to do just that to me, very annoying.

"Green" is the most calming.

I remember when my Dad's Panasonic CB radio the Red LED channel readout had some burned out digits after a number of years.

I found a match in "Green" and replaced it with that instead of red.

Looked much better!


Some items I have purchased with LED displays have offered a choice between red, blue, or green. The last two, I opted for blue. I checked all three colors and for me personally, blue was the most pleasing to the eye. Red was "alarming", green seemed too "disciplined", blue was "friendly".

Somewhere I read that for some reason blue LEDs are the most costly to provide.
No. 318     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 17, 2015 at 1:46 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I sure like the color blue in a digital readout though!


The last Escort radar detector I purchased offered a choice of color for the LED display versus traditional red. I opted for blue. Pretty cool. When driving at night I prefer the blue, versus looking up and seeing red which mentally to me indicates "danger" or a "problem".


Studies have shown that the color' "Red" is the most stressful on the nervous system.

Red LED's tend to do just that to me, very annoying.

"Green" is the most calming.

I remember when my Dad's Panasonic CB radio the Red LED channel readout had some burned out digits after a number of years.

I found a match in "Green" and replaced it with that instead of red.

Looked much better!


Some items I have purchased with LED displays have offered a choice between red, blue, or green. The last two, I opted for blue. I checked all three colors and for me personally, blue was the most pleasing to the eye. Red was "alarming", green seemed too "disciplined", blue was "friendly".

Somewhere I read that for some reason blue LEDs are the most costly to provide.


That is correct, Blue IS the most costly to produce and sometimes costs more than other colors.

The magic ingredient is: "Gallium nitride". The Blue LED was invented around 1986 by a, Japanese Chemist, a PHD Student at a Japanese University, and another student there.

In 2014 all 3 of them received the Nobel Prize in Physics for their inventing the"Blue LED".

Here is a short .PDF file on it/them: http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/2014/popular-physicsprize2014.pdf
No. 319     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 17, 2015 at 1:48 AM     
The price of Blue LED's has seemed to come down dramatically over the years though.

I remember not too long ago they were considerably more expensive than red, green, or yellow.

Nowadays not so much.
No. 320     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  123john62   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Sep 17, 2015 at 5:32 AM     



Was rummaging at a used computer store
was literally filled with computers of
every kind almost up to the ceiling.
The rummaging paid off.
I found 6 .... yes, six, military spec,
weather and dust proof, used Panasonic
Toughbooks in almost perfect condition.
4K touchscreens and half had the very
hard to find original Panasonic
touchscreen tablet stylus.
I got all six for less and $90.00 total.

I can't believe it. ...............

I'm thinking of modifying the exterior
of some and adding high quality customized
rubber on the top and bottom to add even
more shock proof protection over the
already super tough magnesium body of the
Panasonic Toughbook laptops.










No. 321     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 17, 2015 at 12:35 PM     
123john62 wrote:




Was rummaging at a used computer store
was literally filled with computers of
every kind almost up to the ceiling.
The rummaging paid off.
I found 6 .... yes, six, military spec,
weather and dust proof, used Panasonic
Toughbooks in almost perfect condition.
4K touchscreens and half had the very
hard to find original Panasonic
touchscreen tablet stylus.
I got all six for less and $90.00 total.

I can't believe it. ...............

I'm thinking of modifying the exterior
of some and adding high quality customized
rubber on the top and bottom to add even
more shock proof protection over the
already super tough magnesium body of the
Panasonic Toughbook laptops.



Wow looks like you really hit the jackpot there!

Congratulations!
No. 322     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 20, 2015 at 7:29 PM     
I just ordered this model "Mountaineer" backpack. It is water repellent, is 32" Tall x 18" Wide x 8.5" Deep.

It will hold a lot of gear. It has a padded hip belt too.

I go to the Library for 5 hours and catch up on website development. And hang around the River, Dunkin Donuts, Subway, etc.

I may do some Fishing too, would have enough room to bring some Fishing and cooking gear in this thing. Catch the fish, clean them, then fry em up!

Plus this will also have plenty of room for extra Winter clothes if needed, Food, First Aid Kit, Survival supplies, Laptop, book or magazines, etc.

It has a narrow profile so is great for taking on the Bus or Train, doesn't bump into passengers like wide backpacks do!

It would make a good "Bug Out Bag" to keep in a vehicle, etc.

This one is "Invisible Tree Camo" but it also comes in Black, Woodland Camo, Digital Camo, Desert Tan, Green.

For some reason this Camo pattern was about $10 cheaper than their other colors! Probably not as popular as the other colors.

SO I went with it. The pattern is popular with Hunters.

I needed a large Backpack for an upcoming Backpacking/Camping trip this Fall. So we'll see how this performs.

http://www.silvertechsales.net/collections/backpacks/products/extreme-pak-invisible-pattern-tree-camo-water-repellant-mountaineer-backpack

No. 323     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Sep 20, 2015 at 10:17 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I just ordered this model "Mountaineer" backpack. It is water repellent, is 32" Tall x 18" Wide x 8.5" Deep.


I own several backpacks and bags, but the following two are my favorites. My larger one on the left appears to be much like yours. The larger one has a top section can be removed and used as a separate lumbar pack or shoulder sling. The smaller one, if I desire, also makes for a great high performance camera bag. It also meets requirements to be used as a carry-on bag. Both are Mountainsmith brand. A Falcon 55 and an Approach 35.



I also own a large tactical bag by 5.11 that is the same used by a lot of military and law enforcement personnel to tote firearms, ammo, and other gear. It has recently served as a piece of luggage for me on my last two trips.

Last week I acquired a similar to the tactical bag but smaller and having no extendable handle or wheels. At the moment it is serving as my gear bag for to tote back and forth to martial arts class. A typical gym bag was just not working out to "cram" two different pairs of gloves, shin guards, and headgear into in addition to clothing, shoes, and other required items.
No. 324     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 21, 2015 at 12:45 AM     
5.11 makes some very good stuff.

I like that one on the right.

I have a fairly assorted variety of backpacks. Just got an old Italian Army Surplus Rucksack the other day. The small metal buckles are kinda rusty and need replacement. it has leather straps. Will probably replace them all with with the newer plastic buckles. Companies sell, "Repair kits" very cheap and have an assortment of different sized plastic buckles.

I liked this Italian Army rucksack due to the 4 large pockets on the outside. And it was only $15. It's a faded denim blue colored canvas.

I have a bunch of old German Special Forces Rucksacks, one of which I sometimes use. Customers eat those up for some reason.

I have a lot of old Army Green ALICE backpacks and frames I picked up at a Government Surplus Auction years ago at Great Lakes Naval Station. Mostly the Medium sized backpacks but a few of the larger ones.

Have to get the hip belt for one for myself. I would use these for camping, and other reasons but not for daily use. I have found for some strange reason whenever you wear the Olive Drab colored backpacks people automatically think or assume you are an old, "Homeless Veteran" for some reason. :unsure:

I prefer black backpacks but will go with other colors too.

Have a few other backpacks of various types too. One insulated one by Igloo, it's a cooler, helps keep your lunches cold.
No. 325     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 21, 2015 at 8:19 PM     
Fish Antibiotics

Keep a supply of them on hand at all times for emergencies. You'll be glad you did if and when you might need them.

I can speak from firsthand experience with this. They work!

(For those of you who don't know, fish antibiotics are made on the same equipment using the exact same ingredients by the same pharmaceutical manufacturers as that for humans, the same "runs" in fact.

The ONLY difference is that the ones going to humans have one label on the bottle, and the ones going for fish are labeled, "not for human consumption". There is NO difference in the actual ingredient, they are identical and exactly the same. Anyone who tells you otherwise is either full of baloney and doesn't know what they are talking about or is feeding you a line of bull!

We worked in a pharmaceutical manufacturing plant and know firsthand.}

You can find them at a number of online websites but probably locally at Pet stores too.

If you can only afford one type start out with Amoxicillin and then go from there. It is a broad spectrum antibiotic which is effective on both positive and negative gram bacteria.

And when taking them, do NOT "stop" taking them even if your symptoms first disappear. Continue taking them for the entire 10-14 day, "run". This insures they kill off any residual bacteria left in your system.

Stopping your treatment of antibiotics early is what can cause "antibiotic resistant strains" of bacteria to develop, a big problem these days. Mostly due to antibiotics being present in the food we eat, which is given to chickens, cattle, etc.

Here is a good article to start out with. Learn as much as you can about the subject. Only use antibiotics you know you are not allergic too. And only use them if and when they are needed. They are not to be consumed like aspirin. With too much repeated use use your body can develop an immunity to their effectiveness!

http://urbansurvivalsite.com/the-9-best-survival-antibiotics/

The 9 Best Survival Antibiotics

"Survival antibiotics are often overlooked by preppers. One reason is because preppers don’t know which ones to buy or even where to get them. Another reason is because they haven’t needed them before so they forget they might need them in the future. That was the reason I hadn’t stocked up on antibiotics until a long, painful week set me straight.

Last year, on an ordinary evening shortly after dinner, my stomach started bothering me. It wasn’t nausea or a normal stomach cramp. It was a strange type of gnawing pain I’d never felt before. I tried antacids and Pepto Bismol, but nothing worked. I finally took some Tylenol and went to bed.

The next day the pain was still there, but now it had moved over to my lower right abdomen. And as the day continued, it got worse. And worse. Pretty soon it was so bad that I decided to go online and do some research. I thought it might be something like a torn muscle or my appendix, but nothing I found really fit my symptoms. That evening, the pain was so bad I could barely move. I had to walk hunched over and take tiny steps. Any type of sudden movement caused excruciating pain. It was so severe that my wife had to help me take my shirt off before bed. The following morning she took me to urgent care.

It was a long day. The doctor asked a lot of questions and felt my abdomen, but he wasn’t sure what it could be so he ordered blood work and a CAT scan. He thought it might be my gall bladder, in which case I would need emergency surgery. But again, he wasn’t sure if that was the problem because my symptoms just didn’t quite fit. Of course, my wife and I were both afraid it could be something life-threatening.

Eventually a radiologist looked at the scans and identified the problem: I had some type of infectious colitis in my ascending colon (similar to diverticulitis). Basically, my colon was severely inflamed by a bacterial infection. They couldn’t say exactly how it happened, but it’s possible I got it after eating some undercooked meat. That’s rare, but it can happen.

This infection could have killed me if not for the medication he prescribed. And what was this wonderful medicine that saved my life? You guessed it. Antibiotics. Specifically, Ciprofloxacin and Metronidazole. After 10 days of taking those, I was good as new! But I wondered, What if I hadn’t had access to a doctor or antibiotics when this happened? I probably would have died. See how important it is to stock up on antibiotics for survival?

Before we move on, a few disclaimers: First, I am not a doctor and I am not giving you medical advice. I’m just repeating some information I learned. I recommend you ask your doctor if he will write you some prescriptions for antibiotics so you can stock up, just in case. There are other ways you can acquire antibiotics. For example, you could buy the ones that are meant for control of common bacterial infections in fish and/or birds. I’m not saying you should consume them, I’m just pointing out how interesting it is that they’re the exact same as the ones prescribed by doctors. The picture shows a couple of examples.
HyBeam Flashlight

And please, don’t take antibiotics every time you have pain or a fever. Antibiotics are not good for you and should only be taken in an emergency. You should have a good medical book on hand to help you diagnose the problem. And then, only when you are very certain that antibiotics will help, should you take them. I also want to remind you that if you take antibiotics and develop a rash or any other reaction, you should stop taking them immediately. If there is no reaction and your condition improves, continue taking the antibiotic for two weeks, even if you feel better after a few days. Though you might feel better, you want to make sure the infection is completely eliminated.

There are a lot of antibiotics, but I’ve narrowed it down to what I think are the 9 best. These should cover almost 99% of infections. You don’t need to get every single one on this list (for example, Cephalexin, Amoxicillin, and Erythromycin are all very similar, but you might have trouble finding a couple of them).

I can’t tell you everything you need to know in one post. I suggest you look for some books on antibiotics so you’ll know what and how much to use. It’s my hope that this post will at least get you started. Here then, are the 9 Best Survival Antibiotics. I’ll begin the list with the two that helped me.

Ciprofloxacin – Best for things like urinary tract infections, prostate infections, respiratory tract infections (such as bronchitis or pneumonia), bacterial diarrhea, anthrax, and diverticulitis or infectious colitis (when combined with Metronidazole). It should never be used by children, pregnant women or nursing mothers. (Do a web search for “Fish Flox”)

Metronidazole – Usually used for getting rid of anaerobic bacteria which is found in the intestine. Like I said, it can treat diverticulitis or colitis if you take it with Ciprofloxacin. But it can also treat bacterial vaginosis, diabetic foot ulcer, joint or bone infections, lung or brain abscesses, meningitis, and a few other infections. This also shouldn’t be taken by children, pregnant women or nursing mothers. (This one is also sold as “Fish Zole”)

Cephalexin – Great for almost any type of respiratory infection (bronchitis, pneumonia, strep throat, etc.) and middle ear infections. It is safe for pregnant women and children and only has a few side effects. (Do a web search for “Fish Flex”)

Amoxicillin – This will handle most of the same types of bactiera as Cephalexin. It’s also safe for pregnant women and children and has very few side effects. However, some people are very allergic to it. In that case, you should try the next one on the list. (This is also sold as Fish Mox”)

Erythromycin – Like the previous two, this one can also treat most respiratory infections and middle ear infections. It’s also good for Syphilis, Lyme Disease and Chlamydia. And it’s safe for women and children. So why not just forget the other two and store this instead? Because it has several potential side effects including abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

Doxycycline – Treats the same types of infections as Erythromycin. However, Erythromycin can be hard to find whereas this one is often sold as “Bird Biotic.” This is not labeled for human consumption. I’m just pointing it out. This one can also treat sinus infections, Typhus and Malaria. However, it should not be used by children, pregnant women or nursing mothers and there are some side effects including kidney impairment and sensitive skin. (Doxycycline is actually just a newer type of Tetracycline, also sold as “Fish Cycline”)

SMZ-TMP – That is short for Sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprim. Together, these can treat most respiratory infections, but they’re mainly used for urinary tract infections. But the best thing about SMZ-TMP is it can treat MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), also known as resistant staph. This is a strain of bacteria that spreads easily and is resistant to most antibiotics. (Do a web search for “Bird Sulfa”)

Azitrhomycin – This one is similar to numbers 3 through 6 because it treats respiratory infections and all sorts of things like Chlamydia, Lyme Disease, PID, Syphilis, Typhoid, etc. Side effects include abdominal pain, nausea and diarrhea but that is rare. It’s a great antibiotic to have because it treats so many different things. The problem is that it’s hard to find and can be a bit expensive.

Ampicillin – Similar to penicillin, but more effective against things like anthrax and less likely to cause an allergic reaction. Also useful for respiratory tract infections, bacterial meningitis, urinary tract infections, gastrointestinal infections and many other things. (Do a web search for “Fish Cillin”)

If you don’t want to get every one of these, you should at least get the first three on the list. Those three will cover 9 out of 10 infections you might get. As far as storage, just keep them in the refrigerator. You don’t have to, but it will extend their shelf life. Don’t freeze them, though! That can permanently alter their chemical composition and they might not work anymore. They should continue to be effective for years after the expiration date, with one exception: Tetracyclines (which includes doxycycline). These can become toxic if they get too old.

Don’t be caught with a life-threatening infection when it’s too dangerous to go out or after the stores have run out of antibiotics. They don’t cost much and they could save you or a loved one’s life."
No. 326     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 21, 2015 at 8:41 PM     

SURVIVAL ANTIBIOTICS

http://kissurvival.com/survival-antibiotics/



Illnesses caused by viruses usually run their course in 7-10 days. Illnesses caused by bacteria can sometimes be fought off by the body for for the most part if not treated with antibiotics they just get worse and can result in death.

Antibiotics are not like pain killers. You can not just pick your favorite brand. The bugs that antibiotics fight are different. Intestinal diarrhea bacteria is much different from throat, sinus and ear infection bacteria. You have to match the antibiotic with the bug you are fighting. Additionally, some people are allergic to some antibiotics especially the penicillin family. Finally, if you take antibiotics when they are not needed, say for a cold, or if you don’t take them correctly or for the full length of time prescribed, you can help produce antibiotic resistant bacteria.

The FDA and the medical profession control the dispensing of antibiotics through prescriptions. In some countries like Canada and Mexico, you can buy antibiotics over the counter without a prescription. I feel everyone needs to store antibiotics for SHTF scenarios. The questions are “What do I store?”, “Where do I get it?”, “How do I use it?”, and “How do I store it?”

I am not a doctor. My medical background is 3 years as a Med-Tech in the US Army, 1 year of which was spent in a microbiology lab working with some very nasty bacteria, and a life of helping to raise kids that had more than their share of aches, pains and ills. I am not giving medical advice. I am only giving you my opinion based on my personal experience and study. If you need medical advice, seek out the help of a licensed medical professional.

What do I Store?
Everyone has an opinion on this and I will give you some references to study this on your own. Everyone is a little different . Different bugs hit different areas of the country. Kids can not take some antibiotics that adults can take. Some antibiotics are inexpensive and some cost a bunch. Some antibiotics are easy to obtain and some are hard to get a hold of. I am going to give you a list of the antibiotics that I store and tell you why.

First some references:

Cynthia J. Koelker, MD
Seven Antibiotics to Stockpile
Amoxicillin, Cephalexin, Cipro, Doxycycline, Erythromycin, Metronidazole, SMZ-TMP

The Patriot Nurse
Top 5 Antibiotic for SHTF Storage
Zithromax, Ampicillin, Cipro, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline

Dr. Bob
Surviving Healthy
Basic – Penicillin, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, Cephalexin, Sulfa
Penicillin Allergy – Doxycycline, Sulfa, Cefdinir, Cipro

As you can see there is a variety of opinions. So I’ll add one more list to the mix. This is based on my family’s needs. We have no young children or infants and we have one family member that is allergic to some penicillin family drugs. I am giving the generic names since these are cheapest and in the US are just as effective.

Azithromycin – Treats middle ear infections, Upper Respiratory Infections (strep throat, sinusitist), Lower Respiratory Infections (pneumonia, bronchitis) Mycoplasmal Infection (walking pneumonia), Typhoid, Syphilis, PID, Chlamydia, Traveler’s Diarrhea, Lyme Disease and other infections. Azithromycin is derived from Erythromycin but is more effective against some bacteria.

Most common side effects are gastrointestinal: diarrhea (5%), nausea (3%), abdominal pain (3%), and vomiting. Fewer than 1% of patients stop taking the drug due to side effects.

I like Azithromycin because it is a broad spectrum antibiotic and it is not in the penicillin family so you don’t have to worry about the penicillin allergic reactions. It is more effective than many older antibiotics and as of yet, bacteria has not shown much resistance to it. A point against Azithromycin is that it is more expensive than other antibiotics. If cost is a concern Cephalexin and Erythromycin cover pretty much the same bacteria spectrum.

Cephalexin – Treats middle ear infections, Upper Respiratory Infections (strep throat, sinusitist), Lower Respiratory Infections (pneumonia, bronchitis) Bone and Joint Infections, Skin Infections (except MRSA) and Urinary Tract Infections, and other infections.

Cephalexin is well-tolerated in children and is safe in pregnant women. Most common side effects are gastrointestinal upset such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, indigestion, and abdominal pain.

Ciprofloxacin – Treats Urinary Tract Infection, Prostate Infections, Respiratory Tract Infections (Pneumonia, Bronchitis), Bacterial Diarrhea, Mycoplasmal Infection (walking pneumonia), Gonorrhea, Diverticulitis (in combination with Metronidazole), Anthrax, and other infections.

Ciprofloxacin should not used by children, pregnant or nursing women or patients with epilepsy or other seizure disorders.

Doxycycline – Treats Respiratory infections, Sinus Infection, Mycoplasmal Infection (walking pneumonia), , Syphilis, PID, Chlamydia, Prostate Infections, Typhus, Lyme Disease, Malaria and other infections.

Doxycycline should not used by children, pregnant or nursing women. Side effects can include Skin Sensitivity to the sun, Renal Impairment, and impaired effectiveness of birth control.

Close Runners Up

Amoxicillin – Treats middle ear infections, Upper Respiratory Infections (strep throat, sinusitist), Lower Respiratory Infections (pneumonia, bronchitis) Mycoplasmal Infection (walking pneumonia) and other infections. Erythromycin is also used before dental work to prevent infection.

It is safe for children and pregnant women. It is well-tolerated, causing few side effects.

So why don’t I include it with my main stores? Some people are severely allergic to it and it has been so over used in humans and in animals that many bacteria have developed resistance to it.

Erythromycin – Treats middle ear infections, Upper Respiratory Infections (strep throat, sinusitist), Lower Respiratory Infections (pneumonia, bronchitis) Mycoplasmal Infection (walking pneumonia), Early Syphilis, Chlamydia, Lyme Disease and other infections.

Erythromycin is also used before some surgery or dental work to prevent infection. It can be safely used in children and pregnant women.

Erythromycin tends to cause the intestine to contract. Common side effects include, cramps, diarrhea and other Gastrointestinal disturbances like nausea, abdominal pain, and vomiting.

Why don’t I include it with my main stores? If I didn’t include Azithromycin, I would include Erythromycin.

Special Cases
A couple of special cases antibiotics. If you have the money and want to add a couple of specialty antibiotics to your stores just in case you run into the unusual, here are a two antibiotics to consider. If I only added one of them it would be Metronidazole.

Metronidazole – Antibiotic used particularly for anaerobic bacteria and protozoa. Treats Bacterial vaginosis, PID, Diverticulitis, Aspiration pneumonia, Lung Abscess, Diabetic Foot Ulcer, Meningitis, Brain Abscesses, Bone and Joint Infections, Septicemia, Eendometritis, and other infections. It is also effective for amoeba conditions like Trichomoniasis and Giardasis.

Metronidazole should not be used to treat children. Common side effects include diarrhea and nausea and metallic taste in the mouth.

SMZ-TMP – Contains Sulfamethoxazole and Trimethoprim. Sulfamethoxazole is effective against some Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract Infections and Urinary Tract Infections. Trimethoprim is used mainly for Urinary Tract Infections. SMZ-TMP is effective against skin and wound infections, especially treating resistant staph (MRSA).

Common side effects include painful or swollen tongue, dizziness, spinning sensation, ringing in your ears, joint pain, or sleep problems (insomnia).

Where do I get it?
This might be the Sixty-Four Dollar question but I’ll try and give you some options.

Option 1 – Find a sympathetic doctor who you have a relationship with and is willing to write a prescription for you. Make sure you are knowledgeable and can explain what you want, why you want it and how you plan on using it. If you can’t talk intelligently with your doctor, they won’t feel good about writing you a prescription.

You can tell your doctor about prepping and ask for prescriptions for stores. Another possibility is to get antibiotics in preparation for a trip to a third world country. When I went to the far east, my doctor gave me a prescription for Azithromycin, Ciprofloxacin, and Doxycycline to take with me. The Azithromycin was for any upper respiratory infection I might get, the Ciprofloxacin was for any urinary tract infection I may get and the Doxycycline was for protection from Malaria. I had a great illness-free trip and put the antibiotics in storage when I returned home.

A variation on this theme is http://www.survivinghealthy.com. Dr. Bob is a real physician. He understand a prepper’s need to store antibiotics. He has 4 ready made antibiotic packs ranging from $120 to $220. You fill out a patient information form and then order your antibiotics. The antibiotics come in your name with information on their use and dosages. This is all legal and above board.

Option 2 – Visit Canada or Mexico. Both countries sell antibiotics over the counter without a prescription. You notice I said VISIT Canada or Mexico. Don’t order the antibiotics, especially from Mexico. Mail order drugs have a good chance to be nothing but placebos. Drugs bought face to face over the counter in a pharmacy will be okay.

As I understand US customs laws, you can bring 50 units (pills) per person of any antibiotic for your personal use back into the US with you. If the total cost of the pills exceeds $300 you may have to pay a customs fee.

Option 3 – This one is a grey area. From my research it appears that antibiotics made for animals (especially fish and birds) are the exact same antibiotics made for humans. The key is to ensure that the antibiotic is the only ingredient in the pill or capsule and that the dosage is the same as the human dosage. I have to add that ordering or having a controlled substance with intent to use it other than its intended purpose is against the law. Buying pet antibiotics and storing them in preparation for buying fish or birds as pets seems to be within the law. If SHTF and you had to pull out the pet antibiotics and use them in an emergency, I don’t think you would receive any grief.

Here is a list of pet antibiotics and their generic equivalents.
• FISH-MOX (amoxicillin 250mg)
• FISH_MOX FORTE (amoxicillin 500mg)
• FISH-CILLIN (ampicillin 250mg)
• FISH-MYCIN (erythromycin 250mg)
• FISH-FLEX (keflex 250mg)
• FISH-FLEX FORTE (keflex 500mg)
• FISH-ZOLE (metronidazole 250mg)
• FISH-PEN (penicillin 250mg)
• FISH-PEN FORTE (penicillin 500mg)
• FISH-CYCLINE (tetracycline 250mg)
• BIRD-BIOTIC (doxycycline 100mg)
• BIRD-SULFA (SMZ-TMP , sulfamethoxazole 400mg/trimethoprim 80mg)

You may have noticed that a pet equivalent for Azithromycin was not listed. At this time, Azithromycin is only licensed for humans. The other antibiotics are available at Amazon, PetMeds, ebay and lots of other places. Just do a search. The least expensive place I have found is Countryside Pet

One last thought. If you add the cost of antibiotics using this animal antibiotics option and the cost of the antibiotics packs you can order from Dr. Bob, there is less than a 5% – 10% difference.

How Do I Use It?
The dosage and length of time to take an antibiotic varies depending on what infection you are treating. There is no way I could cover all that information in this blog. The best source is to get a copy of the “Nurses Drug Handbook”. It will provide dosage and other information. Sometimes you can find a free download of an older version. I picked up last year’s edition by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins from Barnes & Noble’s online used textbooks for $2 plus shipping.

If you are going to store antibiotics and other drugs you need a reference book to help you use them properly. With that said, here are a few of the most common used for each antibiotic on my list.

Azithromycin
Tablets come in doses of 250 mg and 500 mg. The 250 mg tablets are often dispensed in packages of six and commonly referred to as a “Z-Pak,” A common dose of oral azithromycin therapy consists of a “double dose” of medication on the first day of treatment and subsequent treatment for four or five additional days.

Cephalexin
Usual Adult Dose for Ear Infection – 500 mg orally every 6 hours for 10 to 14 days
Usual Adult Dose for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection – 250 to 500 mg orally every 6 hours for 7 to 10 days

Ciprofloxacin
Urinary Tract Infection (Mild/Moderate) – 250 mg every 12 hours for 7 to 14 days
Urinary Tract Infection (Severe/Complicated) – 500 mg 250 mg every 12 hours for 7 to 14 days
Inhalational Anthrax – 500 mg 250 mg every 12 hours for 7 to 14 days

Doxycycline
Usual Adult Dose for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection – 100 mg orally every 12 hours for 7 to 10 days
Usual Adult Dose for Bronchitis – 100 mg orally every 12 hours for 7 to 10 days
Usual Adult Dose for Pneumonia – 100 mg orally or IV every 12 hours for 10 to 21 days

Erythromycin
Usual Adult Dose for Upper Respiratory Tract Infection – Mild to moderate infection: 250 to 500 mg (base, estolate, stearate) or 400 to 800 mg (ethylsuccinate) orally every 6 hours.
Usual Adult Dose for Otitis Media – Mild to moderate infection: 250 to 500 mg (base, estolate, stearate) or 400 to 800 mg (ethylsuccinate) orally every 6 hours.
Usual Adult Dose for Bronchitis – Mild to moderate infection: 250 to 500 mg (base, estolate, stearate) or 400 to 800 mg (ethylsuccinate) orally every 6 hours.

Metronidazole
Usual Adult Dose for Bacterial Vaginosis – 500 mg orally every 12 hours for 7 days
Usual Adult Dose for Amebiasis – 500 to 750 mg orally 3 times a day for 5 to 10 days

How Do I Store It?
The military conducted a series of drug shelf-life tests in conjunction with the FDA and drug companies. The drug companies participated on condition that the results would be know only to the military to aid them in stock piling drugs but the results should not be made known to the public for fear of lost revenue.

Here is a DOD news article about the tests. Program Extends Drug Shelf-Life

Here is another article by Laurie P. Cohen, staff reporter for the Wall Street Journal. Many Medicines are Potent Years Past Expiration Dates

The results of the testing was they found out that more than 90% of medications were still effective up to 15 years after their expiration date.

Shelf-Life of drugs has a lot to do with storage conditions just like it does with food. Cool, Dry, and Dark are the optimum storage conditions. I use a resealable paint cans from Home Depot to store my drugs. I have a gallon size for antibiotics and a quart size for pain medication. I put an oxygen absorber in with the prescription bottles and seal the lid tight. If I need to open the can to add or use some pills, I add a new oxygen absorber and reseal it. A glass jar would work just as well but make sure it is stored out of the light. (Metal and glass are the only air tight containers).

If you have a vacuum sealer you could vacuum seal the bottle of antibiotics in a bag before placing it in a paint can or glass jar.

That’s it. Good Luck. Be responsible."



Ed Rogers

Copyright “Keep It Simple” 2012. All Rights Reserved.
No. 327     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 21, 2015 at 9:16 PM     
I used to work in a Bank where the Executive VP of Operations kept a drawer full of various kinds of "Fish Antibiotics".

I was always puzzled as to why she had these different fish antibiotics in her drawer but there were no aquariums or fish in the building. :unsure:

A few years later when I got into survivalism and prepping I discovered why!!!
No. 328     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 59   on  Sep 21, 2015 at 9:26 PM     
thanks, i bookmarked the link
and there is a farm store nearby that handles
catfish pond type stuff, will check it out, sounds worthy,
kind of like equine antibiotics
No. 329     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 21, 2015 at 11:27 PM     
crayons wrote:

thanks, i bookmarked the link
and there is a farm store nearby that handles
catfish pond type stuff, will check it out, sounds worthy,
kind of like equine antibiotics


Plenty of online pet and vet supply houses that carry it.

Here is one of the lower priced ones I found.

http://www.allivet.com/c-148-fish-birds-antibiotics.aspx

Also keep in mind if you order for example the 250mg Amoxicillin rather than the 500mg capsules you should take a double dose, 2 - 250mg capsules = 500mg dose 3 times per 24 hour period. A "course" which you should take usually runs 7-14 days depending on the type of antibiotic.

No. 330     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Sep 24, 2015 at 5:03 PM     
Well the large backpack I ordered in post #322 arrived today.

I am impressed by it and it has far more zippered pockets than mentioned.

The design is patented here in the USA but it is made in china.

It has an internal waterproof liner.

The padded hip belt is thicker and bigger than I thought. The waist band and buckles are bigger too, more than 2" wide it appears although i'd have to get a ruler out to be sure.

I should be able to stuff a lot of clothes in it and stop at the Laundromat near work before work to do laundry sometimes.

I think this is big enough to do a week long Backpacking trip with.

For what I paid for it, $30+ this appears to be a real bargain! We shall see how well it holds up under use...
No. 331     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 2, 2015 at 8:41 PM     
Bought a few First Aid supplies at Dollar General the other day.

Some "Butterfly Closure Strips". Can't tell you how many times i've used them in my life, lol. If you do not have access to sutures, Doctors, Hospitals, etc. these can help close wounds that might normally require a few stitches and hold them closed until they heal.

Some large adhesive fabric Bandages. I will split them up into 3 different First Aid Kits I am growing and expanding upon.

I am trying to get into the habit of buying and adding a few First Aid supplies to my kits every paycheck.
No. 332     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 7, 2015 at 8:29 PM     
Tried out the big Mountaineer Backpack I posted in #322.

I loaded it up with clothes to wash before work at the Laundromat. I still had room to spare underneath the hood. And still more room in the bottom pouch. I put some canned goods in the bottom pouch.

It felt heavy enough though and I didn't want to overload it and rip the shoulder straps before I even go on my Backpacking trip!

I was huffing and puffing while Bicycling to the Bus stop. Haven't exercised during my 2 days off.

Walked down the hill after the Bus dropped me off near work, and then to the Laundromat and did laundry. After folding it all it held a surprising amount of clothes including a thin wool sweater and a security jacket.

I washed some long underwear/shirts just tpo have it on hand for cold spells. And i'll likely bring it with me on the backpacking trip. It is really windy along Lake Michigan this time of year, thus kinda cold!

A Winter cap and gloves are a must due to the wind!

My campsite will be slightly off the lake with some tree protection though.

But I do recall every time we camped there this time of year we needed hats and gloves!

The rear pouch on the back of the backpack holds both of my Netbooks including their chargers perfectly. Might even hold both at once.

The side pouches are huge, very long, but different.

The one on the right has a zippered compartment with another zippered compartment on top of that to hold slimmer items.

I put a First Aid Kit in that pouch along with some other stuff.

The left pouch has a zipper but no outer thinner pouch, just a fishnet type holder. Unfortunately that fishnet doesn't seem big enough to hold a water bottle, the pouch would though.

The top of the pack has 4 loops for strapping a foam sleeping pad for example on top, or something else lightweight.

It is best to keep your heaviest items as low as possible and close to your back.

The inside of the pack has a corded loop "bottom" so you can actually unload or pull gear out from the bottom zippered compartment as well as from the top. Kinda handy, don't have to unload the entire pack to get at the items down below.

It has adjustable straps and buckles galore to compress or keep gear tight in the pack.

The padded hip belt seems good too.

This pack can easily hold a week's worth of camping gear, even longer.

Would probably make a good serious "bugout bag" even if just thrown or kept in a car for emergencies.

So far I am very happy with it for the little I paid for it!

:ban_dance:

No. 333     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 7, 2015 at 8:32 PM     
The Laundromat has WiFi too so now that I have their password I can use it here right next door at Subway as well
No. 334     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 16, 2015 at 1:57 AM     
I just bought a pack of 10 "AAA" Alkaline Batteries at Family Dollar tonight for $2.85.



It is important to keep a stock of Alkaline Batteries on hand for emergencies.

I would recommend keeping an assortment of all sizes on hand for all of your flashlights, radios, etc.

"AAA", "AA", "C", "D", and "9 Volt" along with any others you might need. These are obviously the most common and widely used sizes.

Even if you don't use them they are a very valuable barter item in the event of a societal collapse or natural disaster.

EVERYONE uses and needs Batteries!

You can trade them for other items.

They can last a LONG time just sitting on the shelf. Extreme heat or cold are their enemies.

Keep them out of the sun, and do not freeze them.

The best place to store Alkaline batteries is in a Refrigerator. When you go to use them, take them out and let them sit at room temperature for 24 hours before using them.

Be sure and rotate your stock of stored batteries using up the oldest ones first.

How Long Do Batteries Last in Storage?

"The lifetime of a battery in storage strongly depends on its chemistry and construction. Commonly available alkaline types can sit on a shelf up to 10 years with little loss in power. On the other hand, many rechargeable batteries hold up only a few months. Heat and other conditions also influence how well batteries survive long-term storage.

Self-discharge is the phenomenon in which chemical reactions occur in a battery that’s not connected to a circuit; the reactions create an internal resistance that slowly uses up the battery’s energy.

All battery chemistries are subject to self-discharge, although some last longer than others.

For example, lithium-metal primary batteries have among the lowest rates of self-discharge, losing only 10 percent of their energy in 5 years.

Alkaline batteries also have good shelf lives, having a self-discharge rate of about 3 percent per year.

Nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries, on the other hand, self-discharge relatively quickly; they can lose up to 15 percent in the first 24 hours after charging, then another 15 percent for each month that follows.

Leakage

Carbon-zinc batteries, an older battery technology, have a tendency to leak their electrolyte; while powering a device, the electrolyte consumed the zinc outer case, eventually perforating it and allowing the semi-liquid insides to leak out. Although alkaline batteries have a different construction than carbon-zinc types, they also have problems with leakage. Rechargeable batteries are much less prone to leaking, but if improperly charged, their cases might break, causing the batteries to leak.

Storage Temperature

Chemicals tend to react faster at higher temperatures, so excessively hot conditions speed up self-discharge and reduce a battery’s storage life. For example, a lead-acid battery stored for a year at 40C has 62 percent of its charge left; at 0C, this figure improves to 97 percent. Cool temperatures maximize storage life although you must avoid very cold conditions, as freezing can damage batteries.

Trickle Charging

Because a lead-acid battery self-discharges relatively rapidly, it helps to connect it to a trickle charger when the battery is unused for long periods. A trickle charger passes a small amount of current through the battery at the proper voltage, reversing the effects of self-discharge. For example, if you ride a motorcycle during warm months and store it for the winter, keeping the battery on a trickle charger ensures that it will be ready when spring arrives."



Read more : http://www.ehow.com/info_12317303_long-batteries-last-storage.html
No. 335     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 16, 2015 at 2:31 AM     
One note of caution. Beware of, "Counterfeit Batteries". Those that LOOK like name brand batteries but in fact are not! Sometimes they will kind of copycat a name brand battery maker's logo or name in an attempt to fool you into thinking you're buying the real thing when in fact you're not!

Generic batteries like Family Dollar, etc. however can be quite good, and are often in fact actually made by the name brand battery manufacturers!

Here is a website that shows how to spot counterfeit batteries.

Most all the name brand Battery Manufactured batteries are counterfeited. Eveready, Duracell, Sony, etc.

I have actually seen these counterfeits in some stores like gas stations, Big Lots, and elsewhere. You can usually tell if examining the packaging and printing closely. Something often just doesn't look quite right about it, the typeface or colors may be a bit off, mispelled names, crummy packaging or printing, faded colors indicating low quality ink.

Run from these counterfeits like the plague and inform the store owner why you refuse to buy them. He may not even be aware they are fake.

http://www.thelongestwayhome.com/resources/How-to-spot-fake-batteries.html
No. 336     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 16, 2015 at 2:34 AM     
How to spot fake Duracell Batteries...

https://thecounterfeitreport.com/product/106/
No. 337     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 16, 2015 at 2:37 AM     
A WARNING about illegal and counterfeit fake batteries from Ebay's website:

http://www.ebay.com/gds/A-warning-about-FAKE-Batteries-and-illegal-Batteries-/10000000002638505/g.html
No. 338     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Oct 26, 2015 at 1:37 PM     
I have a few of these around with my various bags and gear. I recently read they are the brand of choice by EMS services and being handed out free worldwide by Emergency Management Services assisting with disasters.



LifeStraw filters to 0.2 microns through the use of hollow-fiber membranes, which are small tubes with even smaller pores. These pores allow water to pass, but prevent contaminants larger than 0.2 microns from flowing through.

They are essentially pocket size, 1 x 1 x 9 inches.
No. 339     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 26, 2015 at 1:53 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

A WARNING about illegal and counterfeit fake batteries from Ebay's website:

http://www.ebay.com/gds/A-warning-about-FAKE-Batteries-and-illegal-Batteries-/10000000002638505/g.html


I need a Kodak KLIC-7006 battery for my digital camera.
No. 340     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Oct 26, 2015 at 2:16 PM     
insular926 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

A WARNING about illegal and counterfeit fake batteries from Ebay's website:

http://www.ebay.com/gds/A-warning-about-FAKE-Batteries-and-illegal-Batteries-/10000000002638505/g.html


I need a Kodak KLIC-7006 battery for my digital camera.


I was recently researching spare batteries for my Nikon digital. Saw some great deals from some Sellers on eBay. More than 50% off the Nikon retail price. Saw such on Amazon also. But it was obvious these were not Nikon OEM batteries.

Even though you are 100% protected buying on eBay and Amazon, as far as being able to get your money back, I decided to not risk damage to my expensive camera to save $30-$40 per battery. Then purchased a couple Nikon OEMs.
No. 341     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 29, 2015 at 3:03 AM     
I just bought one of these Military Surplus babies, brand new. :ban_dance: They are on sale for only $34.95 right now at Major Surplus, regular $99.95 but Goretex Jackets like these generally go for a lot more than this in the commercial market.

It is an ECW Jacket (Extreme Cold Weather). It's made for keeping you dry in rain, and is made out of Goretex, which is high quality stuff!

I do not know how long they will be on sale for that price or if they will run out and never be seen again (happens often with Military surplus stuff) so I grabbed one now while I could! "Strike while the iron's hot" as they say!

This will make a great Survival Jacket! TWENTY POCKETS!!! And TWO inside Pistol pockets for concealed carry.

One could fit all kinds of bugout goodies in this thing, weapons, T.P., Hand or Body Warmers, Food Energy Bars, First Aid Kits, Ammo, Fishing Tackle, whatever!

Would also make a great Fishing Vest, Photographer's vest, etc.

Comes in either Black, Olive Drab, Woodland Camo, or Coyote colors. M, L, XL, or 2XL.

Here are the specs: https://www.majorsurplus.com/e-c-w-breathable-moisture-repellent-foul-weather-casual-duty-jacket.html

"Made of breathable Gore-Tex(R) style membrane fabric. Features concealable hood in zippered collar, zip-off sleeves to convert to a vest, concealed right and left handed pistol holsters, front and rear "D" ring attachment points, 20 assorted pockets with zipper or hook-n-loop closure and full front covered zipper with snap closure. Jacket folds into the rear zippered pouch."

No. 342     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 29, 2015 at 9:15 AM     
I wonder what to "D Rings" on the front and back were for? :unsure:

I think they would be good for carrying keys on a key ring with a good clip on Carabiner.

Maybe hang a Kubaton on one of them too, lol.
No. 343     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Oct 29, 2015 at 11:59 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I just bought one of these Military Surplus babies, brand new. :ban_dance: They are on sale for only $34.95 right now at Major Surplus, regular $99.95 but Goretex Jackets like these generally go for a lot more than this in the commercial market.


That looks like a nice jacket. Although I already have tons of winter outdoor clothing, I may get one. I have been sorting through old stuff and taking it to Goodwill, and then buying new.

Thanks for the link.
No. 344     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Oct 29, 2015 at 1:12 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I just bought one of these Military Surplus babies, brand new. :ban_dance: They are on sale for only $34.95 right now at Major Surplus, regular $99.95 but Goretex Jackets like these generally go for a lot more than this in the commercial market.



I got a 10% OFF FIRST ORDER popup when I went to the site.
No. 345     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 29, 2015 at 4:38 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I just bought one of these Military Surplus babies, brand new. :ban_dance: They are on sale for only $34.95 right now at Major Surplus, regular $99.95 but Goretex Jackets like these generally go for a lot more than this in the commercial market.



I got a 10% OFF FIRST ORDER popup when I went to the site.


I've been buying from Major Surplus n Survival for years.

Great company.

They will mail out full colored sales catalogs every month or so too.

No. 346     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 29, 2015 at 4:49 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I just bought one of these Military Surplus babies, brand new. :ban_dance: They are on sale for only $34.95 right now at Major Surplus, regular $99.95 but Goretex Jackets like these generally go for a lot more than this in the commercial market.


That looks like a nice jacket. Although I already have tons of winter outdoor clothing, I may get one. I have been sorting through old stuff and taking it to Goodwill, and then buying new.

Thanks for the link.


Better do it quick.

They just emailed me And said they are out of the black in XL, only have M, L, and 2XL left so I emailed them back and told them to ship me a size Large instead.

They only have the XL available in Olive Drab.

And these are genuine Military Surplus, likely new. I can spot those Government tags with all the legalese on them a mile away!
No. 347     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 29, 2015 at 5:00 PM     
A size large will fit me too, especially since i've been Bicycling and walking daily to keep my weight down.

The reason I wanted to order an XL is so I could wear extra layers underneath like a thick wool sweater, etc.

So a size large will do too, just a bit more snug.

Heck i'd even wear this "underneath" a different jacket if need be!

This looks like more of a "Foul Weather Jacket" rather than a Winter jacket.

I wanted it for the water resistant factor too.
No. 348     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Oct 29, 2015 at 9:07 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I just bought one of these Military Surplus babies, brand new. :ban_dance: They are on sale for only $34.95 right now at Major Surplus, regular $99.95 but Goretex Jackets like these generally go for a lot more than this in the commercial market.


That looks like a nice jacket. Although I already have tons of winter outdoor clothing, I may get one. I have been sorting through old stuff and taking it to Goodwill, and then buying new.

Thanks for the link.


Better do it quick.

They just emailed me And said they are out of the black in XL, only have M, L, and 2XL left so I emailed them back and told them to ship me a size Large instead.

They only have the XL available in Olive Drab.

And these are genuine Military Surplus, likely new. I can spot those Government tags with all the legalese on them a mile away!


I ordered a Black in Large earlier today. I have lots of issues with sizes on such things. Medium fits me best as far as arm length, but too tight in chest and shoulders. Thus I often to go with large when sizes are S, M, L, etc. and tolerate the extra room in the body and waist with arms often too long. But elastic and/or Velcro cuffs often solve this.

Plus with much clothing being made in China these days, Large runs somewhat smaller than it once did.
No. 349     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 29, 2015 at 9:27 PM     
I can see it now...i'll wear this one Sunday when taking the Train and one of the contract Police will stop and question me, "What's in all the pockets?"

To which i'll reply, "Speedloaders of course!" LOL. (just kidding).

Perhaps I can stuff a bunch of fishing tackle in all the pockets, or candy.

I can actually go fishing before work, the River is right across the street and lots of people do fish there. I've seen a number of big fish jumping out of the water as well as some good catches.

Most of the contract Police on the Train kinda suspect I work in either law enforcement or the Security industry. They can tell by the way I look and dress. I never wear my Uniform coming and going to work for various reasons.

Street people have sometimes mistaken me for a Cop before just by the aura I give off.
No. 350     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Oct 30, 2015 at 1:33 AM     
Lol, I told my brother about this coat and his response was like, "Well, you're going down to the Caribbean and you need a winter coat???"
No. 351     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Oct 30, 2015 at 1:49 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Lol, I told my brother about this coat and his response was like, "Well, you're going down to the Caribbean and you need a winter coat???"


I don't know if it even qualifies for a winter coat up here in the north.

More like a wet weather jacket.

Well see how much if any insulation it has.

I wanted it for the rain resistance, breathability, and all those pockets!
No. 352     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Nov 1, 2015 at 3:25 PM     
No. 353     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Nov 5, 2015 at 11:39 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

Lol, I told my brother about this coat and his response was like, "Well, you're going down to the Caribbean and you need a winter coat???"


I don't know if it even qualifies for a winter coat up here in the north.

More like a wet weather jacket.

Well see how much if any insulation it has.

I wanted it for the rain resistance, breathability, and all those pockets!


My jacket arrived today just as I was going out the door. Too busy to even open the box right now. Maybe later this evening when I get back from Krav and everything else that is going on.
No. 354     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Nov 5, 2015 at 12:01 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

Lol, I told my brother about this coat and his response was like, "Well, you're going down to the Caribbean and you need a winter coat???"


I don't know if it even qualifies for a winter coat up here in the north.

More like a wet weather jacket.

Well see how much if any insulation it has.

I wanted it for the rain resistance, breathability, and all those pockets!


My jacket arrived today just as I was going out the door. Too busy to even open the box right now. Maybe later this evening when I get back from Krav and everything else that is going on.


I totally forgot about this. I'd be interested in your evaluation, including how close the sizing conforms to standards (S,M, L, Xl), and anything else you'd care to comment upon.
No. 355     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Nov 5, 2015 at 5:37 PM     
Mine hasn't arrived yet, supposed to be here tomorrow..
No. 356     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Nov 6, 2015 at 3:15 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

Lol, I told my brother about this coat and his response was like, "Well, you're going down to the Caribbean and you need a winter coat???"


I don't know if it even qualifies for a winter coat up here in the north.

More like a wet weather jacket.

Well see how much if any insulation it has.

I wanted it for the rain resistance, breathability, and all those pockets!


My jacket arrived today just as I was going out the door. Too busy to even open the box right now. Maybe later this evening when I get back from Krav and everything else that is going on.


I totally forgot about this. I'd be interested in your evaluation, including how close the sizing conforms to standards (S,M, L, Xl), and anything else you'd care to comment upon.


Storm this jacket is fantastic!

Brand new, unused.

The size Large I ordered fits me perfectly even with room to spare wearing a quilted flannel shirt underneath.

They no longer have any XL's bt they do have 2XL last time I talked to them.

The 2 inside concealed carry pockets are conformed to the shape of a Pistol and have 2 Velcro straps to hold your pistol down.

The huge zippered pouch on the back which the entire jacket can fold into looks big enough to hold a small Laptop, Magazines, or Books, almost like a mini backpack.

I transferred all my junk from my 4 pocket Stearns windbreaker into this thing. Everything is now nice and organized where I can find and access it.

As I mentioned earlier I would not consider this a Winter Coat but rather a very good foul weather rain jacket. Definitely heavier than a standard Windbreaker though.

I have not tried the foldout hood yet which is tucked into the neck collar for now.

A fantastic Jacket and well worth the money I paid for it!
No. 357     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Nov 9, 2015 at 12:16 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

Lol, I told my brother about this coat and his response was like, "Well, you're going down to the Caribbean and you need a winter coat???"


I don't know if it even qualifies for a winter coat up here in the north.

More like a wet weather jacket.

Well see how much if any insulation it has.

I wanted it for the rain resistance, breathability, and all those pockets!


My jacket arrived today just as I was going out the door. Too busy to even open the box right now. Maybe later this evening when I get back from Krav and everything else that is going on.


I totally forgot about this. I'd be interested in your evaluation, including how close the sizing conforms to standards (S,M, L, Xl), and anything else you'd care to comment upon.


Storm this jacket is fantastic!

Brand new, unused.

The size Large I ordered fits me perfectly even with room to spare wearing a quilted flannel shirt underneath.

They no longer have any XL's bt they do have 2XL last time I talked to them.

The 2 inside concealed carry pockets are conformed to the shape of a Pistol and have 2 Velcro straps to hold your pistol down.

The huge zippered pouch on the back which the entire jacket can fold into looks big enough to hold a small Laptop, Magazines, or Books, almost like a mini backpack.

I transferred all my junk from my 4 pocket Stearns windbreaker into this thing. Everything is now nice and organized where I can find and access it.

As I mentioned earlier I would not consider this a Winter Coat but rather a very good foul weather rain jacket. Definitely heavier than a standard Windbreaker though.

I have not tried the foldout hood yet which is tucked into the neck collar for now.

A fantastic Jacket and well worth the money I paid for it!


Although not as thrilled with this jacket as Bullfighter seems to be, for what you get for the money, I find it difficult to knock it.

The verdict is still out for if this jacket suits me personally. Despite the weather at the moment not requiring such outdoor wear, I have been wearing it for the past two days.

Personally, I am not happy with the fit or functionality. My 5.11 and ScotteVest brands fit much more comfortable and "nicer", and offer much more functionality with much easier access to compartments/pockets. But then again, they cost you more than you are going to put out for this jacket.

Being the owner of genuine military wear directly from the Selfridge Air Force base not a far drive from me down the road, I doubted this jacket was of genuine military surplus. Construction, material, and/or label not like what I typically see of existing known to be genuine military wear. But at dinner yesterday I showed the jacket to my brother-in-law who served in the Gulf War, he states it appears to be genuine military foul weather wear as issued to them. He appeared impressed with the jacket for the money.

After a couple more days of practical wear, I will report more.
No. 358     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Nov 9, 2015 at 2:58 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Although not as thrilled with this jacket as Bullfighter seems to be, for what you get for the money, I find it difficult to knock it.

The verdict is still out for if this jacket suits me personally. Despite the weather at the moment not requiring such outdoor wear, I have been wearing it for the past two days.

Personally, I am not happy with the fit or functionality. My 5.11 and ScotteVest brands fit much more comfortable and "nicer", and offer much more functionality with much easier access to compartments/pockets. But then again, they cost you more than you are going to put out for this jacket.

Being the owner of genuine military wear directly from the Selfridge Air Force base not a far drive from me down the road, I doubted this jacket was of genuine military surplus. Construction, material, and/or label not like what I typically see of existing known to be genuine military wear. But at dinner yesterday I showed the jacket to my brother-in-law who served in the Gulf War, he states it appears to be genuine military foul weather wear as issued to them. He appeared impressed with the jacket for the money.

After a couple more days of practical wear, I will report more.


Personally I did not buy this jacket for any, "comfort factor".

I was only attracted to it by the number of pockets as a potential survival jacket and it's rain resistance factor.

And so far for the $35 I paid for it I am very happy with it.

I doubt I could find any similar jacket like this in a store for just $35.

I needed a decent, "rain jacket" and that's what I got it for.

This thing does tend to be, "noisy" making crackling sounds when moving around. But I don't intend on doing any Hunting with it.

I'm quite sure there are more comfortable jackets out there at considerably higher cost. My $150 rain resistant goretex police/security jacket being one of them. It is definitely more comfortable and is what I wear at work while on duty.

It's supposed to rain Wednesday here so i'll put it to the test then.

Have been wearing it for a few days the first day as an outer garment, everyone thinks you're a SWAT Cop and insists on calling you, "Sir" which people often do anyway. The days afterward I wore it underneath a flannel quilt jacket.

Was very warm despite it being freezing outside.

One a side note I have purchased pallets of Military Surplus from Selfridge ANG base in the past. Been decades since I was there last though.

The term, "Military Surplus" is getting confusing these days.

Often times the same company that manufactures clothing for the US Military also does so for the Civilian market as well, the only difference sometimes being in the labels.

Then with typical Military Clothing it can sometimes be made by multiple different unrelated companies made according to certain Government Specs.

You will often see variations in the labels, coloring, and even materials from one company to the next despite the article of clothing being made to Government specs.

I have large triwall boxes full of these variations in clothing.
No. 359     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Nov 9, 2015 at 3:06 PM     
Chia seeds are the ultimate survival food for long-term storage



(NaturalNews) "In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, there's a lot of renewed interest in preparedness. One thing we all learned from the disaster is that when the power grid goes down, starvation isn't too far behind for those who have failed to store food.

It's easy to store a 72-hour supply of food just by shopping at the grocery store, of course: Canned soup, bread, peanut butter and even salted nuts are all readily available as long as you don't wait until the last days before a storm hits to buy some supplies.

But what if you're looking for food that keeps you alive during a long duration grid failure or natural disaster? What if you need to feed yourself and your family for 30 days or longer without a single trip to the grocery store? That's where you have to start thinking more strategically about storable food.

Personally, I want storable food to have the following characteristics:

1) High density nutrition: Provides a lot of nourishment while using on a small amount of shelf space.

2) Non-GMO: Throughout the storable foods industry, the vast majority of foods are loaded with TVP, GMO, MSG, yeast extract and hydrolyzed proteins. I want my storable food to be free of all that.

3) Multitude of uses: I want the food to be usable in a variety of different recipes so that it never gets boring.

4) Affordability: It needs to be affordable per ounce, so that it doesn't cost a fortune to stock up.

5) Shelf life: It needs to store for years without requiring any special attention.

6) Allergens: The food needs to be free of common allergens like gluten and soy.

7) Taste: It needs to taste good! Otherwise, who's gonna eat it?

Why chia seeds are the perfect storable survival food

1) Nutrition: Chia seeds are a very high source of omega-3s, which are linked to a wide variety of health benefits. They also contain magnesium, amino acids and a healthy assortment of minerals. They're almost like tiny vitamins.

2) Non-GMO: Chia seeds are completely non-GMO. Even better, the organic chia sold by the Natural News Store is certified USDA organic, meaning it has never been sprayed with pesticide or fungicide chemicals.

3) Multitude of uses: Chia seeds can be soaked in water and tea to make a hearty beverage, they can be sprinkled on salads and cereals, they can be blended into bread mixes and pancake mixes, and they can even be added to sauces, dressings and dips. Chia is one of the most versatile superfoods on the planet.

4) Affordability: Chia seeds are a fraction of the price of many other superfoods on an ounce-by-ounce basis. In terms of the nutrition they provide, they're one of the most affordable long-term storable superfoods yet discovered.

5) Shelf life: Chia seeds easily store for 2 - 4 years without refrigeration, and 4+ years if refrigerated. They only require a dry, cool location. Better yet, chia doesn't go rancid very quickly like flaxseed does. And if you grind chia into a chia meal, it still has a long shelf life (1 - 2 years), unlike flax meal which goes rancid in less than 90 days.

6) Allergens: Chia contains no gluten, no wheat, no corn and no soy. It is widely considered a "universal" food because nearly everyone can eat it, including family pets and farm animals.

7) Taste: Chia tastes WAY better than flaxseed! The taste is actually more "neutral" than anything else, meaning it goes extremely well with almost any recipe you can imagine: Smoothies, cereals, bake mixes, etc.

Click here to check out Organic Chia Seed at the Natural News Store.

Other astonishing benefits of chia

Chia seeds have:

• 3 times the iron of spinach
• 5 times the calcium of milk
• 2 times the potassium of bananas
• 2 times the protein of any other seed or grain
• 3 times the antioxidant potency of blueberries

Click here to get organic chia seeds discounted right now at the Natural News Store.

How to store chia for long-term preparedness

The organic chia we offer is already packaged in moisture-proof barrier bags that provide a protective barrier against oxidation and moisture.

Currently, you can save $1 per bag by purchasing 7 bags at once. Take these 7 bags of chia and place them into a five-gallon plastic pail (which you can purchase at any hardware store). Then get some gamma seal lids from Amazon.com, which provide a screw-on lid to a five-gallon pail.

Store the pail in a dark, cool, dry place (such as a root cellar), and you're done! The pail is virtually rodent proof, and the gamma seal lid gives you easy access. The chia seed bags are individually sealed inside the five-gallon pail, giving you a double barrier against moisture and oxidation.

The five-gallon pail can also be packed with other complementary superfoods such as hemp seeds, buckwheat, quinoa or organic coconut sugar. Because five-gallon pails have handles, they're easy to grab and load into vehicles during an evacuation.

Here's another tip: Label each five-gallon pail with a permanent marker so you know what's in it. You can also create an emergency first aid pail containing a variety of health and medical supplies including colloidal silver, bandages and gauze, and even potassium iodide for protection against nuclear radiation.

For labeling difficult-to-label items such as plastic pails, I like to use sharpie paint pens (oil-based), which you can find at Amazon.com or art / craft supply stores.

Protecting the pails from insects

If you're worried about insects getting into the pails, simply purchase some diatomaceous earth (DE) and sprinkle it liberally along the bottom of the pail and even across the packaged food items you're placing in the pail.

DE is completely non-toxic to humans and is, in fact, edible. Many people actually take it as a supplement to aid in detox. Just be sure not to breathe the DE dust, because it contains tiny fragments of razor-sharp dust that are bad for your lungs. So hold your breath or wear a mask when sprinkling DE.

DE will kill any insects that attempt to walk through it. This works physically by "cutting" the exoskeletons of insects until they dehydrate and die. There are no chemicals in DE.

Be sure to keep plastic pails out of the sunlight because UV light renders plastic fragile and it will eventually crumble if kept outside. If you're looking to store food in something more resistant to sunlight, your best bet is to purchase surplus ammo cans, which you can find at various online suppliers.

The important thing is to stock up ahead of time so you're not caught unprepared when the next crisis strikes."

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037916_chia_seeds_storable_food_preparedness.html#ixzz3r1wRBolc
No. 360     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Nov 9, 2015 at 3:14 PM     
I found Chia Seeds in bulk at our local Hispanic Grocery Store for $6.59 per lb.

The little buggers are a bit expensive.

I bought some this morning for making some home made Choklit/Chia Survival bars from this recipe...

There are too many photos to post here but here is the link:

http://diyready.com/survival-bar-recipe-instructions-chocolate-chia-survival-food/
No. 361     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Nov 10, 2015 at 12:31 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Although not as thrilled with this jacket as Bullfighter seems to be, for what you get for the money, I find it difficult to knock it.

The verdict is still out for if this jacket suits me personally. Despite the weather at the moment not requiring such outdoor wear, I have been wearing it for the past two days.

Personally, I am not happy with the fit or functionality. My 5.11 and ScotteVest brands fit much more comfortable and "nicer", and offer much more functionality with much easier access to compartments/pockets. But then again, they cost you more than you are going to put out for this jacket.

Being the owner of genuine military wear directly from the Selfridge Air Force base not a far drive from me down the road, I doubted this jacket was of genuine military surplus. Construction, material, and/or label not like what I typically see of existing known to be genuine military wear. But at dinner yesterday I showed the jacket to my brother-in-law who served in the Gulf War, he states it appears to be genuine military foul weather wear as issued to them. He appeared impressed with the jacket for the money.

After a couple more days of practical wear, I will report more.


Personally I did not buy this jacket for any, "comfort factor".

I was only attracted to it by the number of pockets as a potential survival jacket and it's rain resistance factor.

And so far for the $35 I paid for it I am very happy with it.

...


Well, like I said, for no more than the jacket cost even including the cost of shipping, it is hard to knock the jacket. Almost feel guilty to do so.

I do have some personal issues with the jacket. My body measurements are not typical. In many cases, medium might fit me acceptable, but I am big in the shoulders, chest, and biceps, with short arms. Therefore to really be comfortable I often have to go to a Large for a jacket to not be tight in the arms, chest, and shoulders. This often results in a jacket with too long of sleeves for me and too long in the body. Which I often tolerate to have more body room in the piece of clothing.

But this jacket runs on the small side for a Large compared to my other typical clothing. Even for a Large, it is still somewhat tight in the chest and shoulders and too short in the body. The Velcro wrist adjusters do accommodate for the too long of sleeves. Cannot do much about the short body without going to a larger size, but an Extra Large I am sure would leave me with way too long of arms and too large in the body. The short body of the jacket and all the bulging pockets make me appear to be a black box with a head on it walking around. Having said that though, anyone that has spoke up, typically says something like "nice jacket".

The jacket is made of very noisy material. But I can live with that, being I too will not being wearing a black jacket hunting.

Lots of pockets for toting things, but I find them to provide very inconvenient access when wearing the jacket. Almost have to take it off to easily access the pockets, versus wearing such as my ScotteVest jacket. This inconvenience is mostly due to the short body of the jacket placing the pockets higher than convenience level.

I have been "carrying" when wearing the jacket the past couple days. Inside pockets nicely secure any size handgun I own, outside pockets nicely fit my smaller frame handguns. But I find the short body and style of the jacket hinder quick access to a handgun whether carried in the inside or outside pockets. And other pockets are not sized appropriate to fit extra mags of rounds.

The weather has not been all that cold. But based on how the jacket appears to hold body heat, I believe it would somewhat suffice in colder winter weather. Maybe not for extended periods. But with weather here currently in the high 40s and low 50s, I find myself bordering on sweating in the jacket in just a few minutes. Weather is chilly with rain today. I was comfortable in the jacket outdoors.

A liking or at least acceptance for the jacket is growing. Especially after wearing it to Krav class. Several active military, law enforcement and security personnel attend the classes. After taking orders for like 20 of the jackets at $99.95 each I now like it.

Just kidding. I took no orders for the jacket. But the comments on the jacket by those that spoke up were favorable and asking where I got it.

Yesterday I was borderline on returning the jacket and/or giving to my brother-in-law truck driver ex military who appears to really like it. But I think I will hang on to it, if for nothing else as a backup jacket left in the car for emergency use.
No. 362     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Nov 10, 2015 at 5:14 PM     
Still on the borderline about ordering it. The extra $11 shipping is a factor, though minor - more annoyed that they only use FedEx, thus entailing a higher shipping charge.
No. 363     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Nov 11, 2015 at 10:02 PM     
There is a local defensive, hands-on knife fighting class later on this month. It will use Krav Maga techniques. I'm seriously thinking of signing up for it.
No. 364     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Nov 12, 2015 at 2:01 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

There is a local defensive, hands-on knife fighting class later on this month. It will use Krav Maga techniques. I'm seriously thinking of signing up for it.


I have attended several such classes myself recently. Have attended hands-on knife, firearms, club/stick, and car-jacking self-defense classes over the past few weeks.

The Krav center I attend holds sessions every Saturday instructing law enforcement, military, and security personnel as well as classes for civilians. I have been heads up in class with local law enforcement and taken a "beating". By this time next year, I expect to be certified or at least functioning as an apprentice as their instructor.

My courses are Krav Maga Worldwide certified. The two US leaders in that realm appear to be Krav Maga Worldwide and International Krav Maga. Both credible and reputable.

I ended up at a KMW center being there are only two schools in the entire state of Michigan with a certified Krav Maga Black Belt instructor on the training staff. Both KMV centers. In my opinion, at least as local to me as possible, that gave the edge to KMV and was by far the easiest for me to commute to. KMW and IKM certified centers are both some distance from me.

Whether certified training or not, I am sure you will find the experience and instruction worthwhile and valuable.
No. 365     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Nov 12, 2015 at 9:05 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Well, like I said, for no more than the jacket cost even including the cost of shipping, it is hard to knock the jacket. Almost feel guilty to do so.

I do have some personal issues with the jacket. My body measurements are not typical. In many cases, medium might fit me acceptable, but I am big in the shoulders, chest, and biceps, with short arms. Therefore to really be comfortable I often have to go to a Large for a jacket to not be tight in the arms, chest, and shoulders. This often results in a jacket with too long of sleeves for me and too long in the body. Which I often tolerate to have more body room in the piece of clothing.

But this jacket runs on the small side for a Large compared to my other typical clothing. Even for a Large, it is still somewhat tight in the chest and shoulders and too short in the body. The Velcro wrist adjusters do accommodate for the too long of sleeves. Cannot do much about the short body without going to a larger size, but an Extra Large I am sure would leave me with way too long of arms and too large in the body. The short body of the jacket and all the bulging pockets make me appear to be a black box with a head on it walking around. Having said that though, anyone that has spoke up, typically says something like "nice jacket".

The jacket is made of very noisy material. But I can live with that, being I too will not being wearing a black jacket hunting.

Lots of pockets for toting things, but I find them to provide very inconvenient access when wearing the jacket. Almost have to take it off to easily access the pockets, versus wearing such as my ScotteVest jacket. This inconvenience is mostly due to the short body of the jacket placing the pockets higher than convenience level.

I have been "carrying" when wearing the jacket the past couple days. Inside pockets nicely secure any size handgun I own, outside pockets nicely fit my smaller frame handguns. But I find the short body and style of the jacket hinder quick access to a handgun whether carried in the inside or outside pockets. And other pockets are not sized appropriate to fit extra mags of rounds.

The weather has not been all that cold. But based on how the jacket appears to hold body heat, I believe it would somewhat suffice in colder winter weather. Maybe not for extended periods. But with weather here currently in the high 40s and low 50s, I find myself bordering on sweating in the jacket in just a few minutes. Weather is chilly with rain today. I was comfortable in the jacket outdoors.

A liking or at least acceptance for the jacket is growing. Especially after wearing it to Krav class. Several active military, law enforcement and security personnel attend the classes. After taking orders for like 20 of the jackets at $99.95 each I now like it.

Just kidding. I took no orders for the jacket. But the comments on the jacket by those that spoke up were favorable and asking where I got it.

Yesterday I was borderline on returning the jacket and/or giving to my brother-in-law truck driver ex military who appears to really like it. But I think I will hang on to it, if for nothing else as a backup jacket left in the car for emergency use.


Military/Law Enforcement Jackets like these are supposed to, "ride high" with the elastic band fitting just above your "Duty belt".

That way the bottom of the Jacket does not interfere with the wearer attempting to reach for anything on his duty belt such as his Firearm, Cuffs, Pepper Spray, Baton, etc.

My $150 security Jacket is cut the same way, they are designed to fit just, "above" your hips (the duty belt), not around it covering it up. The elastic band keeps it snug against your body and away from your duty belt.

In addition my security jacket has 2 zippers on each side of your hips which extend upward about 6-8" if desired so it can fit around a Firearm.

Also it was pretty clear to me fronm the photo that this was not an, "assault vest" designed to hold Pistol or Rifle Magazines. The pouches looked too small in the photo for that.

Although one could probably fit some small Magazines in those zippered and inside pockets if needed. Or Speedloaders if one carries a revolver.

Last night I noticed for the first time the additional pockets above the inside concealed carry pockets. I hadn't even noticed they were there until last night, lol.

I have already been finding various items I carry are fitting perfectly into all those various little pockets.

Sometimes it is challenging remembering where they all are!

Also last night I was able to test the jacket out in the Rain about once an hour and it beaded up and bounced right off!
No. 366     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Nov 12, 2015 at 9:30 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:Last night I noticed for the first time the additional pockets above the inside concealed carry pockets. I hadn't even noticed they were there until last night, lol.


LOL. Had to go look. As well as I thought I had examined this jacket, I too missed those upper inside pockets.

I am well aware the jacket is intended to fit high around the waist. My older same style military jackets do also. It is simply an aspect I personally do not really like. There may be some entertaining owning the jacket for other than law enforcement and/or military use, and also may not appreciate that feature. I guess what I was mostly intending to share was in response to Storm's inquiry about fit. This jacket runs on the small side compared to clothing with the same designated sizing. Thus shorter in the body than I would have expected.

It was also obvious the jacket had no pockets specifically designed to fit mags. But that does not mean I have to like that aspect, especially with the jacket providing fairly nice inside carry pockets but then not appropriately provide for carry of a spare mag or two. I say fairly nice, due to the pockets do hold a firearm well. But quick access is inconvenient due to location inside the jacket contributed to by the short body for the size expressed, and the Velcro strap design. My experience with other concealed carry wear is the pockets are more appropriately positioned for easier access and provide a more convenient Velcro system despite being short body styles.
No. 367     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Nov 12, 2015 at 2:59 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

There is a local defensive, hands-on knife fighting class later on this month. It will use Krav Maga techniques. I'm seriously thinking of signing up for it.


This evening I am attending my 4th and 5th Krav classes this week. The entire week we have primarily been working on breaking free from wrist holds and defending against 3 attackers at once.
No. 368     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Nov 12, 2015 at 6:54 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

There is a local defensive, hands-on knife fighting class later on this month. It will use Krav Maga techniques. I'm seriously thinking of signing up for it.


This evening I am attending my 4th and 5th Krav classes this week. The entire week we have primarily been working on breaking free from wrist holds and defending against 3 attackers at once.



Good for you!

My class just got cancelled. The instructor just broke his leg.
No. 369     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Nov 13, 2015 at 12:06 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

There is a local defensive, hands-on knife fighting class later on this month. It will use Krav Maga techniques. I'm seriously thinking of signing up for it.


This evening I am attending my 4th and 5th Krav classes this week. The entire week we have primarily been working on breaking free from wrist holds and defending against 3 attackers at once.



Good for you!

My class just got cancelled. The instructor just broke his leg.


Although all 5 are not Krav Black Belts, of our 5 Krav instructors, 4 are capable of instructing any of the weapons defense classes.
No. 370     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Nov 21, 2015 at 3:14 AM     
No. 371     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Nov 25, 2015 at 7:19 PM     
I was at the local Hispanic grocery store and noticed they had 10 lb bags of Rice on slae for only $3.99.

I noticed the same brand in 20 lb bags was $10.99 so it was cheaper to buy the 10 lb bags.

I grabbed one and stuffed it into my small backpack and hoofed it home along with a few other things.

if it is still on sale Friday I might bring my huge Mountaineering Backpack and stuff 4-6 bags into it.

it might even fit more.

Rice, Beans (dried), Flour, Sugar, Salt are the basic staples one should start out stocking in bulk. They are the cheapest and rice with beans makes a, "complete protein" so they say.

You can live a long time on that supplementing your diet of course with other things.

Plus you can barter it, especially to Hispanics and Asians.

They will last for decades if kept moisture and oxygen free sealed in mylar bags with oxygen absorbers.

I still have a long way to go to reach my goal of storing rice and beans but I buy some here and there once in awhile to grow my stock of it.

If hyperinflation ever sets in it is good to have food socked away one can fall back on regardless of how high grocery store prices get.

No. 372     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 7, 2015 at 10:40 AM     
After work I stopped at Dollar General and just got back home with a few things.

I wanted to get a large pack of 9" Styrofoam Plates on sale for $3 for 110 in a pack.

however right next to those I saw 180 Plates for only $4. It didn't take me long to do the math and get the bigger 180 in a pack.

I get on the Bus, the Bus Driver looks down at the Plates I was carrying in a plastic bag and he says, "Where did you get those!?"

I told him, "Dollar General" right over there, as I pointed out the window towards the store.

He said "he was at a store the other day and they were out of plates!"

Paper or Styrofoam Plates are great for keeping on hand for Natural Disasters such as Tornadoes, Fires or Floods, Earthquakes, Civil War, etc.

Reason being you don't need ANY "Water" for washing plates after eating! And that really is an issues for anyone who has experienced any of the above Natural Disasters.

Just ask them! There often is NO water available for washing!

And they can make great Barter items for other things even if you never need many.

They are also good for Camping, Picnicking, and ESPECIALLY for "Boating"!!!

Boats, whether Houseboats or Sailboats water must often be rationed out carefully. You can't just run the shower for example like you can at home full blast for 20 minutes straight. Showers on Boats often have special nozzles which make the spray a fine mist thus conserving water.

Water on Boats in storage have priorities. Drinking water is #1.

Everything else comes after that!

Using Styrofoam Plates conserves water which can be used for other purposes since those plates do not have to be washed. Such as for Drinking, Bathing, or flushing the Head.

The downside is they become garbage, and must be stored in garbage bags or cans then disposed of somewhere, not in the water.

They do burn well in Campfires however! }} And they are even good for starting Campfires or wet wood since they are a fuel of sorts.

The EPA may frown on this practice however...:shades:

Anyway I intend to buy more such large quantities of these Styrofoam Plates and store them away for a rainy day. You never know when you might need them and as I mentioned they could be used to trade or give away to others who have experienced a disaster.

No. 373     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Dec 7, 2015 at 11:00 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:Anyway I intend to buy more such large quantities of these Styrofoam Plates and store them away for a rainy day. You never know when you might need them and as I mentioned they could be used to trade or give away to others who have experienced a disaster.



Personally, I stock up on paper plates and stay away from the Styrofoam ones when survival reasons are the goal in mind. I may purchase Styrofoam ones for typical day to day use, but even then most often purchase paper ones.
No. 374     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 7, 2015 at 11:08 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:Anyway I intend to buy more such large quantities of these Styrofoam Plates and store them away for a rainy day. You never know when you might need them and as I mentioned they could be used to trade or give away to others who have experienced a disaster.



Personally, I stock up on paper plates and stay away from the Styrofoam ones when survival reasons are the goal in mind. I may purchase Styrofoam ones for typical day to day use, but even then most often purchase paper ones.


Obviously the paper ones take up far less room than styrofoam ones. But I find the styrofoam ones here anyway to be cheaper.

With paper ones I often end up having to use 2 or 3 plates stacked to prevent certain wet or greasy foods from leaking through.

They both have their pros and cons.
No. 375     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 7, 2015 at 11:13 AM     
Oh I forgot to mention all the Boating Books say it is "generally safe" to use Boiled Ocean or Sea water in order to wash dishes while out to sea.

Same applies for using water on any of the, "Great Lakes" here in the Midwest. That would be safe for washing dishes too, when boiled first.

I would not however use, "River Water" for dishwashing unless it has been run through a sophisticated filtration system such as a "Reverse osmosis" filter or a British Berkey Filter for example.
No. 376     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Dec 7, 2015 at 1:09 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:
They do burn well in Campfires however! }} And they are even good for starting Campfires or wet wood since they are a fuel of sorts.

The EPA may frown on this practice however...:shades:



I think more so than the EPA may frown on it. Although my guess is that we most all do and/or have, you should not burn such in campfires and/or fireplaces simply due to what you yourself may immediately inhale.

I and fellow firefighters have spent time sitting in hospitals with some having to stay overnight after fighting fires that had Styrofoam burning.
No. 377     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 7, 2015 at 3:28 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
They do burn well in Campfires however! }} And they are even good for starting Campfires or wet wood since they are a fuel of sorts.

The EPA may frown on this practice however...:shades:



I think more so than the EPA may frown on it. Although my guess is that we most all do and/or have, you should not burn such in campfires and/or fireplaces simply due to what you yourself may immediately inhale.

I and fellow firefighters have spent time sitting in hospitals with some having to stay overnight after fighting fires that had Styrofoam burning.


Personally I choose not to inhale the fumes from Campfires, Styrofoam or otherwise.

I have sat in on firefighting training sessions where they said today's Firefighters have it different than those of a hundred years ago for example.

Everything in a home or business is now plastic, plastic, plastic!

It burns differently, causing thick black smoke verses white smoke of years past. It is harder to see and breathe than say fires of years past. Far more toxic too.

Some time ago I read an article of a middle eastern muslim overseas somewhere who burned a US Flag and died because he inhaled the burning fumes of the Nylon the Flag was made of.
No. 378     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Dec 7, 2015 at 3:43 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
They do burn well in Campfires however! }} And they are even good for starting Campfires or wet wood since they are a fuel of sorts.

The EPA may frown on this practice however...:shades:



I think more so than the EPA may frown on it. Although my guess is that we most all do and/or have, you should not burn such in campfires and/or fireplaces simply due to what you yourself may immediately inhale.

I and fellow firefighters have spent time sitting in hospitals with some having to stay overnight after fighting fires that had Styrofoam burning.


Personally I choose not to inhale the fumes from Campfires, Styrofoam or otherwise.

I have sat in on firefighting training sessions where they said today's Firefighters have it different than those of a hundred years ago for example.


I hear ya, but in the fires I refer to we have been specifically informed the traces of contaminates found in our blood was from breathing the burning foam based materials. And such is what you were referring to burning in a campfire.
No. 379     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 8, 2015 at 12:59 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
They do burn well in Campfires however! }} And they are even good for starting Campfires or wet wood since they are a fuel of sorts.

The EPA may frown on this practice however...:shades:



I think more so than the EPA may frown on it. Although my guess is that we most all do and/or have, you should not burn such in campfires and/or fireplaces simply due to what you yourself may immediately inhale.

I and fellow firefighters have spent time sitting in hospitals with some having to stay overnight after fighting fires that had Styrofoam burning.


Personally I choose not to inhale the fumes from Campfires, Styrofoam or otherwise.

I have sat in on firefighting training sessions where they said today's Firefighters have it different than those of a hundred years ago for example.


I hear ya, but in the fires I refer to we have been specifically informed the traces of contaminates found in our blood was from breathing the burning foam based materials. And such is what you were referring to burning in a campfire.


If the Firefighters up that way are ending up in the Hospital all night from inhaling fumes from a styrofoam plate burning in a Campfire perhaps they should consider moving their chairs back from the Campfire a bit.

Or perhaps think about investing in some bottled Airpacs to avoid breathing in toxic fumes. Most Fire Departments have and use them these days you know, at least the Fire Dept's around here. Maybe their budget doesn't allow for them? Too bad.

Heck we even had emergency airpacs scattered throughout the 100+ year old Hydroelectric Power Plant I worked at every few hundred feet in case of fire and the CO2 system activated so we could escape before dying of Oxygen deprivation.

We did have the bigger aipacs though as well.
No. 380     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Dec 8, 2015 at 1:58 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
They do burn well in Campfires however! }} And they are even good for starting Campfires or wet wood since they are a fuel of sorts.

The EPA may frown on this practice however...:shades:



I think more so than the EPA may frown on it. Although my guess is that we most all do and/or have, you should not burn such in campfires and/or fireplaces simply due to what you yourself may immediately inhale.

I and fellow firefighters have spent time sitting in hospitals with some having to stay overnight after fighting fires that had Styrofoam burning.


Personally I choose not to inhale the fumes from Campfires, Styrofoam or otherwise.

I have sat in on firefighting training sessions where they said today's Firefighters have it different than those of a hundred years ago for example.


I hear ya, but in the fires I refer to we have been specifically informed the traces of contaminates found in our blood was from breathing the burning foam based materials. And such is what you were referring to burning in a campfire.


If the Firefighters up that way are ending up in the Hospital all night from inhaling fumes from a styrofoam plate burning in a Campfire perhaps they should consider moving their chairs back from the Campfire a bit.


You know very well that is not what I stated or even implied.
No. 381     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 10, 2015 at 8:05 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
They do burn well in Campfires however! }} And they are even good for starting Campfires or wet wood since they are a fuel of sorts.

The EPA may frown on this practice however...:shades:



I think more so than the EPA may frown on it. Although my guess is that we most all do and/or have, you should not burn such in campfires and/or fireplaces simply due to what you yourself may immediately inhale.

I and fellow firefighters have spent time sitting in hospitals with some having to stay overnight after fighting fires that had Styrofoam burning.


Personally I choose not to inhale the fumes from Campfires, Styrofoam or otherwise.

I have sat in on firefighting training sessions where they said today's Firefighters have it different than those of a hundred years ago for example.


I hear ya, but in the fires I refer to we have been specifically informed the traces of contaminates found in our blood was from breathing the burning foam based materials. And such is what you were referring to burning in a campfire.


If the Firefighters up that way are ending up in the Hospital all night from inhaling fumes from a styrofoam plate burning in a Campfire perhaps they should consider moving their chairs back from the Campfire a bit.


You know very well that is not what I stated or even implied.


You know very well that attempting to compare a single burning styrofoam plate in a campfire vs. a Fireman entering a burning building full of clouds of smoke and inhalaing smoke from burning petroleum based materials forcing him to spend the night in the Hospital is ridiculous.
No. 382     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 10, 2015 at 8:19 PM     
I needed a new Backpack for daily commuting back and forth to work so I decided on this one. It is a Tactical Backpack having 6 external pockets and a large main compartment with some smaller dividers inside.

It is not the best or most expensive one out there. There are definitely better quality and heavier duty ones especially in the $45 to $75 range or so.

But this one was only $39.95 and more within my current budget so I grabbed one.

I tend to become frustrated having to search through the main compartment of a backpack hunting for those smaller items so being able to, "compartmentalize" items and find them quickly and easily is important.

One thing about a Backpack with MOLLE or PAL straps is you can add various accessory pouches onto it. I will probably pick up a water bottle pouch and some other small pouches for it for attaching to the back.

I saw someone on a Bus with this model and liked it so figured i'd give it a try.

I ordered it in Black.

Features:

• Tactical Backpack the perfect size to carry a Days supply of essential gear. Multiple compartments and MOLLE webbing to organise and customize your backpack to your needs.
• Main compartment dimensions: 18” H x 12” W x 6” D (1,200 sq inches)
• 4X Side compartments, two on each side: 5” H x 5” W x 1½” D
• Top Outside Compartment: Top 4½” H x 8” W x 2” D & Bottom 9½”H x 9½”W x 3” D
• MOLLE compatible webbing on the front pockets and the bottom of the backpack.
• Heavy Duty: Zippers, Carry Handles on the Top and both Sides of the backpack
• Hydration bladder compatible, with drink tube routing onto either Padded shoulder straps with metal D-rings
• Adjustable Compression Straps on the Sides of the backpack
• Adjustable Sternum and Waist Straps with quick connect buckles
• Durable PVC construction, that is chemical and water resistant

http://www.silvertechsales.net/collections/backpacks/products/black-tactical-backpack-by-vism







Here is a review on this model: http://militarybackpackguide.com/review-vism-tactical-backpack/

It is now available in over 13 different color styles!
No. 383     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Dec 10, 2015 at 9:29 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I needed a new Backpack for daily commuting back and forth to work so I decided on this one. It is a Tactical Backpack having 6 external pockets and a large main compartment with some smaller dividers inside.


Looks like a nice pack. Especially at that price.

I took two different packs on the Chicago trip with me. One that served as my camera bag and another for other incidentals. I was not happy with either. First time I had ever used either pack.

Actually, that same jacket I purchased that you have, served me better than either of the packs. Although it did require something under it on the longer distance walks out in the cold.
No. 384     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Dec 10, 2015 at 9:39 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
They do burn well in Campfires however! }} And they are even good for starting Campfires or wet wood since they are a fuel of sorts.

The EPA may frown on this practice however...:shades:



I think more so than the EPA may frown on it. Although my guess is that we most all do and/or have, you should not burn such in campfires and/or fireplaces simply due to what you yourself may immediately inhale.

I and fellow firefighters have spent time sitting in hospitals with some having to stay overnight after fighting fires that had Styrofoam burning.


Personally I choose not to inhale the fumes from Campfires, Styrofoam or otherwise.

I have sat in on firefighting training sessions where they said today's Firefighters have it different than those of a hundred years ago for example.


I hear ya, but in the fires I refer to we have been specifically informed the traces of contaminates found in our blood was from breathing the burning foam based materials. And such is what you were referring to burning in a campfire.


If the Firefighters up that way are ending up in the Hospital all night from inhaling fumes from a styrofoam plate burning in a Campfire perhaps they should consider moving their chairs back from the Campfire a bit.


You know very well that is not what I stated or even implied.


You know very well that attempting to compare a single burning styrofoam plate in a campfire vs. a Fireman entering a burning building full of clouds of smoke and inhalaing smoke from burning petroleum based materials forcing him to spend the night in the Hospital is ridiculous.


I made no such comparison. I made two entirely separate statements. Someone else then made an attempt to compare them.
No. 385     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Dec 12, 2015 at 7:30 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I needed a new Backpack for daily commuting back and forth to work so I decided on this one. It is a Tactical Backpack having 6 external pockets and a large main compartment with some smaller dividers inside.

...


OK Bull, despite the fact I already have a variety of backpacks, I have now gone and ordered one of these. But I got mine this AM for $27 shipped free.

Time to get rid of some of the others. I have never had an issue getting my money back out of a backpack by simply selling it on eBay.
No. 386     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 14, 2015 at 6:12 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I needed a new Backpack for daily commuting back and forth to work so I decided on this one. It is a Tactical Backpack having 6 external pockets and a large main compartment with some smaller dividers inside.


Looks like a nice pack. Especially at that price.

I took two different packs on the Chicago trip with me. One that served as my camera bag and another for other incidentals. I was not happy with either. First time I had ever used either pack.

Actually, that same jacket I purchased that you have, served me better than either of the packs. Although it did require something under it on the longer distance walks out in the cold.


It already came today.

For paying less than $40 for this thing I am quite impressed with the value received. The zipper seams are all covered with, "Storm flaps" to help keep the rain out.

The inside appears to be a rubberized PVC type material to help keep the contents dry.

I will likely give the whole exterior a spray of Silicone Waterproof spray anyway just to be sure.

The inside has a padded pocket for a laptop. Also has a few compartments sewn inside for organizing things, one of which is a mesh pocket.

The Hip Belt, while not padded, is wider than I thought it would be, at least 2" wide with a nice heavy duty belt buckle, the straps can be adjusted on either the right or left.

Shoulder straps are padded and have a sternum strap for holding them together, a constant headache it seems for me with Backpacks that do not have it. The shoulder straps on other backpacks tend to want to slide off my shoulders if I have a lot of clothing on.

I think the top outer back pocket is where I can fit a toothbrush, toothpaste, and other such stuff where it can be quickly and easily reached. Or maybe on the bottom pouch and put First Aid stuff in the top one.

Then later when I pick up a few pouches put it all in a detachable pouch on those Molle Straps for a removable portable First Aid Kit.

One of the lower right or left outer pockets is where i'll put my various Herbal and other Teas, as well as Chicken & Beef broth packets. Will probably place them in a Ziploc back first.


Overall for less than $40 I am very impressed with the value received! This is definitely heavier quality than some lightweight backpacks I have had. This should do quite nicely for now until I get a bigger or better quality Tactical pack.
No. 387     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 14, 2015 at 10:16 PM     
Ok I began transferring stuff into the new backpack.

The outer back bottom pouch is perfect for carrying a few books in.

The side pouch zippers can be a little difficult to work with at first, likely due to the tight radius they have to work with. A little zipper lube, soap, or chapstick may help with that. Or as they get broken in and used more. Also as the fabric softens up a bit with use they should be easier to use.

I have had other backpacks that had zippers a little hard to use in the beginning because the fabric or backpack material is, "stiff" when new.

The zippers on the main compartments are easy to use though, so that makes me think it is the tight radius on the smaller pouches that makes it more difficult.

The outside bottom of the backpack has 3 rows of MOLLE strips too, 15 loops total down there. So one could strap a sleeping bag or mat down there too.

Looking at the 4 cinch straps on the sides makes me think one could bulk down additional gear on the sides like maybe a collapsing Fishing Rod, or some other long vertical objects like an Axe, Folding Saw, Crowbar, etc.

Heck one could even wrap a jacket or coat if it got too hot while Hiking and rolled up into an upside down, "U" shape then strap it down on the left, top, and right sides with the 4 straps. It certainly wouldn't be going anywhere!

NcStar's website shows a few accessory pouches one could get to strap onto the MOLLE webbing like a water bottle holder, EMT breakout pouch, Dump pouch, and an accessory pouch.

Pricing them all on Amazon they are reasonable, unlike some other brands which cost an arm and a leg!

I'll definitely be expanding on this pack with a few of these accessory pouches:

http://www.ncstar.com/vism-product/shooter-gear-accessories-vism.html

The handles on the top and sides look durable and will definitely be appreciated by Employees in certain stores I go into for supplies/Groceries. (Some stores require you to check in your backpack at the service desk while shopping).
No. 388     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Dec 14, 2015 at 10:32 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:It came already today and was delivered via USPS Priority Mail from Big Bear City, CA. Ironically I can get this Backpack Wholesale from a few of my Distributors but not for the price I paid on Amazon.


Mine has shipped and is on the way. I opted for slowest delivery.

As an Amazon Prime Member, I am eligible for 2 day delivery with free shipping. But if I opt for the slowest delivery, Amazon credits my pantry account with as much as $5.99 per item to be used towards future purchases. Actually it is per order. Even though they may ship it all together, I enter the order for each item individually, thus getting a credit for each item. Often times the up to $5.99 credit is more than the cost of the individual item I am ordering.

And whether I opt for 2 day delivery or slower, I pay nothing for shipping for orders shipped directly from Amazon.
No. 389     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 14, 2015 at 10:37 PM     
They offer 2 different Water Bottle Pouches for attachment onto MOLLE Loops.

http://www.ncstar.com/vism-product/product-list-VISMSG.aspx?productseries=MOLLE%20Hydration%20Bottle%20Carrier

One is an opentop bottle carrier with a drawstring to hold the water in the pouch.





• The New VISM® MOLLE Hydration Bottle Pouch will hold most standard sized water bottles from 8 fl. oz. up to 33.8 fl. oz. (1L) in size.
• Two PAL straps with metal thumb snaps allow you to attach the pouch to MOLLE compatible gear or even around a standard belt.
• Draw Cord on top with spring loaded Plastic Barrel, to cinch the top of the Hydration Bottle Pouch around drinking bottle to keep it secured.
• Bottle Compartment Size: 8.0”Height X 3.25” diameter pouch.
• The pouch can be used to carry other types of gear besides water bottles. The pouch can be used to carry extra ammo, magazines, radios, point and shoot cameras, GPS, cell phones, or any other miscellaneous items that can fit inside the pouch.
• Drain Grommet located on the bottom of the bottle compartment.

The other deluxe one has a zippered top to completely cover the bottle. Plus it has a Rectangular acessory pouch built in that many say will hold an Esbit pocket sized fold up stove and fuel. This one even comes with a shoulder strap!

PHOTO:
http://www.ncstar.com/image/all/product-vism/banner/molle-hydration-bottle-carrier.png


• MOLLE Hydration Bottle Carrier will hold up to 32oz. bottles
• Bottle Compartment Size: 10.0”Height X 4.0” Diameter
• Zippered top lid and a pass through hatch for drinking tubes
• Drain Grommet located on the bottom of the Bottle Compartment
• Two PALS straps to attach the Bottle Carrier to other MOLLE compatible gear
No. 390     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 16, 2015 at 7:21 PM     
I wore the VISM Tactical Backpack to work tonight and immediately noticed 2 improvements over the last 3 Backpacks/Rucksacks I have been wearing.

#1 I noticed the "center of gravity" of the Backpack is much closer to your back. Therefore it is more "stable" when moving around.

The other backpacks are, "deeper" but therefore the weight on them is further out from your body making wearing them more unstable. You move, the backpack moves, and then your body tends to keep going following whichever direction the weight is going.

Not so with this one. All the weight is much closer to your body, a little wider, but definitely more stability with this one.

#2 This Backpack feels easier on your back because the weight is more, "over your shoulders" whereas with the other 3 Backpacks/Rucksacks since they are deeper and the weight out further from your back they tended to "pull you backward" making it harder on your back.

This one doesn't seem to have that strain.

Plus it is because more of the weight is resting on your Hips due to the 2" wide waist belt.

The Sternum strap which holds the 2 shoulder belts together was almost up by my neck choking me.

So I removed them and placed them down a notch onto the next possible loops and that made it now perfect.
No. 391     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 16, 2015 at 7:35 PM     
I was able to place all of the following into the Backpack and still had some room left, especially for smaller stuff.

A Mini Netbook with Power supply.

A 4" x 6" x 3/4" Tither's Topical Bible I found in a Thrift Store today by my former Pastor! His photo is even on the back, lol.

A Security jacket
A Uniform Shirt
An extra pair of Wool socks.

A small First Aid Kit
Tube of topical anesthetic/Pain Killer
Abottle of Benadryl
A bottle of Aspirin
Emergency Hand Warmers.

Large Tube of Toothpaste
Toothbrush and holder

Small can of shaving cream
Disposable Razor

Small Electric Hair Trimmer

1 "AA" or "AAA" sized Battery charger for recharging up batteries for a Flashlight and the electric trimmer, as well as a mini MP3 Player.

1 Fork
1 Spoon
1 Can Opener

1 Large Sweet Potato
3 Apples
2 oranges
2 Bananas
1 Full Head of Romaine Lettuce
2 Celery Sticks
2 Carrots
6 mini sweet peppers
1 pack of Saltine Crackers inside a Rectangular plastic tube designed for them.
2 Packs of Ramen Noodles (For Emergencies)
20 packs of 5 different kids of Herbal Teas in a plastic container
5 key Limes for the Tea.
3 Packets of Chicken Broth
1 Can of Tuna
1 Pen

1 Collapsible Umbrella

And other small stuff i'm sure I forgot about.

Still room for more including room still in all the outside pouches which are about half filled with the smaller items.

No. 392     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 16, 2015 at 7:44 PM     
I also picked up 2 metal water bottles today at a Thrift Store.

.98 for one, a dark navy blue with a screw on top and a Caribiner for attaching to something. Bottles like this are usually $5-6 or more new in the store. This looks new.

I attached it to one of the top side straps and used a lower side strap to tighten around the body of the bottle.

Not crazy about placing a water bottle "inside" the backpack lest the top come loose and get everything wet, especially my netbook. :icon_eek:

This method will do for now until I order a water bottle holder for attaching to the back or side of the pack.

The other metal water bottle is a collectible i'll likely resell. "Buck Knives 50th Anniversary". it has nice artwork on it. Plus a folding Spigot so you don't have to unscrew anything. it would be a shame to get it all scratched up it looks so pretty! $1.98 for that one.
No. 393     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 16, 2015 at 7:52 PM     
I would say this backpack could be used as a medium sized Bugout bag. And they are cheap enough one could leave one at work, one in the car, etc.

Not meant for a lot of weight but will hold a fair amount of gear.

Oh yeah, I think i'll keep my small Baofeng Ham Radio: 2 Meter / 440Mhz / Police/Fire/Emergency/Business Band / Weather band / FM Broadcast band 2-Way Radio in one of the small outside pockets. And the USB cord for charging. Will just unscrew the Antenna and keep it next to it in the pocket so it doesn't break. The Radio is water resistant.

That would be a good idea to keep it with me at all times, just in case!
No. 394     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 16, 2015 at 7:57 PM     
No. 395     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Dec 17, 2015 at 10:41 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I would say this backpack could be used as a medium sized Bugout bag. And they are cheap enough one could leave one at work, one in the car, etc.


Mine arrived Tuesday. I was in hurry headed to do something else when it arrived, thus only tore the package open at top and peeked in realizing it was the backpack. My first thought was "Wow, much small then I expected."

Yesterday I finally took a closer look. The bag was folded in half in the package, thus appearing to be only half its actual width. Have not had to time to examine it further, but appears to be an excellent bag. I opted for it the black color.

The black and the design match my existing tactical gear perfectly. Looks just like my 5.11 stuff. The tag on mine does describe it as VISM "Shooters Gear". Maybe they make some of 5.11's gear.
No. 396     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 21, 2015 at 3:13 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I would say this backpack could be used as a medium sized Bugout bag. And they are cheap enough one could leave one at work, one in the car, etc.


Mine arrived Tuesday. I was in hurry headed to do something else when it arrived, thus only tore the package open at top and peeked in realizing it was the backpack. My first thought was "Wow, much small then I expected."

Yesterday I finally took a closer look. The bag was folded in half in the package, thus appearing to be only half its actual width. Have not had to time to examine it further, but appears to be an excellent bag. I opted for it the black color.

The black and the design match my existing tactical gear perfectly. Looks just like my 5.11 stuff. The tag on mine does describe it as VISM "Shooters Gear". Maybe they make some of 5.11's gear.


I really got a cance to test mine out since i've been wearing to work and back everyday.

One day in addition to everyting elase I had crammed in there I ad listed in an earlier post I also put 3 Hardcover an 2 large paperback books in the bottom of it was well.

The extra weight did not seem to strain it.

Also I was really surprised at how much the backpack was capable of expanding to accommodate extra volume. I packed in sweaters, jackets and it puffed up and expanded outward even more.

This morning it was raining and I did not bring my umbrella so it was subjected to getting wet in a steady rain for 20 minutes while walking home. The last 10 minutes it had stopped raining.

When I got home I carefully examined the backpack to see if it had soaked in or was water resistant like it claimed to be.

Sure enough, the outside had larger dried up already, most water had beaded up and rolled off actually.

Everything inside including my Netbook was completely dry, no water had worked it's way in that I could see.

I will still likely give it a few coats of Silicone spray sometime just to be sure.

And order a black backpack rain cover to place over it to really be sure during heavy rains.
No. 397     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 23, 2015 at 12:35 AM     
Well I finally did it. I went and ordered me an H-45 Military Heater-Stove.

I have been wanting to get one for years and have never seemed to get around to it.

I figured I had better get one while they are still available before the supply of them dries up! They are no longer made for the US Government.

This for those who know anything about it is the "crown jewel" of Survival Stoves! They are ugly, but do the job and well.

I got mine off of Amazon for $129 + a whopping $52 shipping. Because it comes in 2 wooden crates. Supposedly mine has "everything", all parts included minus the Jerry can and stand of course.



It burns Diesel, Home Heating Oil, Kerosene, JP5 through JP8 Aviation Jet Fuels, even Gasoline. (Don't think i'd want to try the gasoline though). It will burn Wood too.

It has an adjustment dial for the different fuel types. It requires absolutely no electric power whatsoever.

It produces anywhere from 15,000 to 45,000 BTU's of heat depending on the temperature setting dial.

It uses an older style 5 gallon Jerry can to hold the fuel and the can then sits on a metal tripod stand. It has an adapter though that will work with the newer Plastic jerry cans.

I'll have to pick the jerry can up separately later.

It was originally designed for heating the Large Military Tents of the GP series.

It would work for an emergency situation, in a Cabin, Garage, Pole barn, etc. as well. It NEEDS some fireproof base underneath it though as it gets very hot. (Was originally designed to just sit on the bare dirt ground.)

A few layers of Firebrick should work.

Here is one article on it: https://www.gunsamerica.com/blog/prepping-101-sub-urban-survival-heater-stove-burns-oilgasoline-45k-btu/
No. 398     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 23, 2015 at 12:44 AM     
Here is a good Video on the H-45 Military Tent Heater-Stove.

https://youtu.be/yjxsgxViOBM

No. 399     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 23, 2015 at 1:12 AM     
Here's another Video on the H-45.

https://youtu.be/okCCxtKKFFI
No. 400     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 23, 2015 at 11:53 AM     
Well after a 30 minute walk through heavy rains and using a small collapsible umbrella the new backpack failed the rain test.

The clothes inside got wet. Fortunately I had wrapped my laptop in a plastic grocery back first as a precaution.

Even still there was a bit of moisture on one part of it. It did not get inside though.

I suspect the rain got in through the zipper seams. Not much I can do about that other than order a rain cover designed for backpacks.

Or use a bigger Umbrella.

It was coming down pretty hard there and my lower pants legs and socks are socked.
No. 401     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Dec 25, 2015 at 10:19 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Well after a 30 minute walk through heavy rains and using a small collapsible umbrella the new backpack failed the rain test.

The clothes inside got wet. Fortunately I had wrapped my laptop in a plastic grocery back first as a precaution.

Even still there was a bit of moisture on one part of it. It did not get inside though.

I suspect the rain got in through the zipper seams. Not much I can do about that other than order a rain cover designed for backpacks.

Or use a bigger Umbrella.

It was coming down pretty hard there and my lower pants legs and socks are socked.


Umbrella's are nice, I've been using them more, I usually get mine from Big Lots or Aldi and always the smallest compact kind.
No. 402     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Dec 29, 2015 at 5:22 PM     
Well the Military Surplus Stove/Heater arrived today.

it comes in 1 Wooden crate not 2.

Unfortunately when I got home to get it I found the UPS Driver had just left it at the bottom of my stairs, being it was too heavy to carry up or use his 2 wheeler.

The public could mis-interpret that location thinking it was something I was throwing out!

It is much bigger and heavier than I thought based on photos and videos.

But that's a good thing!

AND the bottom plywood lid had come completely off. There was bubble wrap sticking out.

Because of this I will have to give the seller on Amazon 1 star less. They need to add some "screws" to the bottom of the crate to prevent this from happening.

After taking the wooden crate apart however it appears all the parts (hopefully) are there. There were 4 paper bags bags of carefully wrapped parts all taped up which looks like something the Manufacturer had used.

And all those were stuffed inside the Heater.

The Stovepipes were in a cardboard box outside the heater but in the crate which could have fallen out but didn't.

Also the "Hotplate" that fits on top of the Stove where you place your pots, pans, coffee pots, etc was loose in the box, along with a long poker tool used for stuffing the prelit paper you stuff down the thing when first lighting it was loose outside the heater.

So those items could have been lost but luckily everything seems to be there, including the original user/maintenance manual from the US Army.

I stuffed everything into the shed for now until I can order a metal surplus or new plastic 5 gallon Jerry can and tripod stand for it.

The stand of course could be made easily but I will get the real deal sometime to make it complete.

I Stove is brand new, unused, no rust. Will have to fire it up when I have everything outdoors to burn off the light coating of cosmoline or whatever they used to prevent rust.

I could then spray paint it black with hi temperature stove paint available at the hardware store.

And will pick up a few more stove pipe fittings at Menard's to be able to use it indoors in an emergency and to test it out.

But overall so far, this is looking like a great investment! :dance::ban_dance:
No. 403     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 101   on  Dec 29, 2015 at 5:36 PM     
With the weather turning colder, that jacket has almost become a daily wearer for me, despite what I felt were inconveniences initially. I do not use the hood. I prefer to wear a light thermal jacket underneath that has a hood.

Growing up I greatly disliked hoods and hats except when hunting. Was more likely to simply wear a headband that covered my ears. In recent years I have started wearing at least a ball cap type of hat, and even more recently pull that hood over my head.
No. 404     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jan 6, 2016 at 7:54 PM     
No. 405     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jan 10, 2016 at 8:07 AM     
Just ordered a pair of:

Fox River 2789 Norwegian Oatmeal Ragg Wool Socks 8.99.

https://secure.armysurplusforless.com/productView.php?id=890



Ragg Wool Mittens $6.99

https://secure.armysurplusforless.com/productView.php?id=4635



And a Black Plastic Canteen, made in the USA, $2.99 or only $1.99 if you order it in Desert Tan or Olive Drab.

https://secure.armysurplusforless.com/productView.php?id=827



First time ordering from this Military Surplus place. They have been in Business for 50 years.

"Army Surplus for Less" in Englewood, CO: https://secure.armysurplusforless.com/index.php
No. 406     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jan 10, 2016 at 8:17 AM     
insular926 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Well after a 30 minute walk through heavy rains and using a small collapsible umbrella the new backpack failed the rain test.

The clothes inside got wet. Fortunately I had wrapped my laptop in a plastic grocery back first as a precaution.

Even still there was a bit of moisture on one part of it. It did not get inside though.

I suspect the rain got in through the zipper seams. Not much I can do about that other than order a rain cover designed for backpacks.

Or use a bigger Umbrella.

It was coming down pretty hard there and my lower pants legs and socks are socked.


Umbrella's are nice, I've been using them more, I usually get mine from Big Lots or Aldi and always the smallest compact kind.


Bought a full sized Golf Umbrella from Dollar general Friday for $6.

This one covers my Backpack and is much wider than the collapsible one. It is 58" wide.

It will do until I can get a cover for the Backpack before the Spring Monsoons.
No. 407     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Jan 10, 2016 at 11:55 AM     
insular926 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Well after a 30 minute walk through heavy rains and using a small collapsible umbrella the new backpack failed the rain test.

The clothes inside got wet. Fortunately I had wrapped my laptop in a plastic grocery back first as a precaution.

Even still there was a bit of moisture on one part of it. It did not get inside though.

I suspect the rain got in through the zipper seams. Not much I can do about that other than order a rain cover designed for backpacks.

Or use a bigger Umbrella.

It was coming down pretty hard there and my lower pants legs and socks are socked.


Umbrella's are nice, I've been using them more, I usually get mine from Big Lots or Aldi and always the smallest compact kind.


I have a small compact Totes umbrella when attempting to pack with less. Although over the years I have had a couple go bad, they have a lifetime warranty. Simply ship it back and they send you another. They may cost a couple bucks more than others, but I have found them to be of higher quality than comparable compact umbrellas. Except for Raines, they are also a good compact brand. I would have to check, but I think Totes and Raines are actually the same company.

As for really large umbrellas, I purchase the large golf umbrellas at Sams in a two pack for $18 and they are of high quality. Friends and family often walk off with them, and I simply buy another 2 pack. Almost always have a pair in the trunk of each car.

I also often like to get them in a bright noticeable color and/or patterns. When at outdoor events with very large crowds and trying to locate your compadres or they locate you, they can be a great aid. I get on my phone and text something like stick up your umbrella or look for the big orange and white striped umbrella waving back and forth to the north of the stadium or whatever. Hopefully everybody else is not doing the same with the same color.
No. 409     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Jan 14, 2016 at 11:55 PM     
I have struggled to keep this so called survival tool in stock since before Christmas. Every bulk order I receive, I have enough backorders for it that I ship them all in same day. It is simply a Yeti keychain bottle opener.

I have at least six sources that drop ship this for me also. They too are out of stock, but neglect to inform me until after being paid for like six orders that I needed to ship yesterday.

I have a design in the works for my own patented version of such a tool that can be made on a 3D printer. Not likely a cost effective method to manufacture for retail, but a great way to get a fast proto type for testing.


No. 410     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Jan 15, 2016 at 5:25 PM     
The Fox River Ragg Wool Socks arrived today.

As expected they were slightly itchy at first. After a few blocks of walking I didn't notice it.

The Ragg Wool Mittens are a generic brand, single layer so not too thick like double layer Ragg Wool Mittens.

As a result your hands don't sweat much and they breathe well.

Haven't tested the canteen yet.
No. 411     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Feb 7, 2016 at 11:32 PM     
Prepper, Survival & SHTF Radio Frequencies.

Save this very important link. This is probably the most complete list I have seen and covers all kinds of bands.

Then save the entire Web page as a complete page onto your hard drive.

Also click the individual Frequency Charts for full sized ones then print out hard copies on your printer. Place them in a binder for safekeeping.


https://radiofreeq.wordpress.com/2013/06/29/shtf-survivalist-radio-frequency-list/
No. 412     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Feb 9, 2016 at 9:48 PM     
I recently purchased an heirloom seed kit.
No. 413     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Feb 10, 2016 at 11:47 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

I recently purchased an heirloom seed kit.


That's on the bucket list too.

I might just make one myself sealing them up in Mylar Bags with an oxygen absorber.

They say the humidity level when packaged had a bearing on seed life too though.
No. 414     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Feb 10, 2016 at 1:47 PM     
Well after weeks of overloading and stuffing that black Tactical Backpack to the gills it is finally popping some threads at the top of one of the shoulder straps.

It's an easy fix right now, have to pick up some heavy duty thread then resew it.

I don't fault the backpack for that because I have been carrying way too much weight and items in it for what it was designed for at times.

I have come to the conclusion I need a slightly bigger and heavier duty Backpack for Winter use. (I stuff a security jacket, extra socks, hat, etc in it for Winter).

So I will reserve this one for Summer or lighter duty use and plan on getting a heavier one soon before I ruin this one.

Here's one I am considering, a "Condor 3 Day Assault Pack":



It has a padded Hip Belt too.

Condor
Condor 3-Day Assault Pack
The high functionality and easy accessibility of the Condor 3-Day Assault Pack make it an ideal combat companion. Made from durable nylon, the exterior boasts massive amounts of webbing for attachments. Have to carry heavy loads for long distances? No problem. The ergonomic design works with your body to make it as comfortable as possible. The shoulder, sternum and waist straps contour to your body, locking you in while the breathable back foam pad provides cushion. Spacious compartments utilize specialized designs for easy storage of documents, maps, firearms and even a hydration pack.

Features

Dimensions: 22" H x 17" W x 11" D
3038 cubic inches
Compression straps on each side can easily compact the bag
All compartments feature grommets for drainage
Hydration-pack compatible
Ergonomic shoulder straps contour to your body and feature a D-ring for attachment purposes
Ultra-comfy foam-pad back panel
Carry-and-drag handle
Bag Breakdown
Hydration pack compartment
Fits 2L or 3L pack
Main compartment
Two mesh pockets
Two straps to lock-in equipment
Double-pull zipper closure
Front Pouch
3 slots for maps and documents
Pen holders
Lower Horizontal Pouch
3 sections
Internal zipper mesh pocket
Dimensions: 12.5" x 6" x 3"
Side pockets
Two on each side of the bag for general storage space
Dimensions: 9" x 5" x 2.5"
Front of the pack
Slender document pocket

Here's another view of this same pack. Amazon has 857 ratings on this pack with a 4.5 star rating. $73.81 with free shipping.


No. 415     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Feb 10, 2016 at 10:03 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

I recently purchased an heirloom seed kit.


That's on the bucket list too.

I might just make one myself sealing them up in Mylar Bags with an oxygen absorber.

They say the humidity level when packaged had a bearing on seed life too though.


I opted for a commercial packed kit. Supposedly contains 20 varieties of the highest quality heirloom vegetable seeds. 100 percent non-GMO, no hybrids, open-pollinated and in sealed mylar packets allowing for long term storage. Rated for 5+ years of storage at 75 Degrees F. Can survive longer if stored at lower temperatures. All harvested seeds are reusable.

The kit was only $14.95 on Amazon and shipped free.
No. 416     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Feb 10, 2016 at 10:16 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Well after weeks of overloading and stuffing that black Tactical Backpack to the gills it is finally popping some threads at the top of one of the shoulder straps.


Of course my same backpack has not seen the use yours has, but thus far there have been no issues.

I cannot say the same for that Major Surplus military issue jacket. Since colder temperatures have set in, it has become a daily wearer and is not holding up to such use.

Appears to be stitched poorly. Thus far the issues are isolated to the d-rings and cuffs. Even with nothing ever having been attached to them, the d-ring stitching is coming loose on the tabs that attach the rings to the jacket. If I had been using them, I would have likely lost whatever had been attached to them. The first one that came off was found lying by my entry door. At first I thought "what did this come from". Then realized it was off the jacket. The stitching on the rest of the d-rings is also poor, as well as the stitching that secures the Velcro around the cuffs is unraveling. I expect the Velcro straps will soon fall off if I do not reinforce them prior.
No. 417     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Feb 10, 2016 at 11:25 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Well after weeks of overloading and stuffing that black Tactical Backpack to the gills it is finally popping some threads at the top of one of the shoulder straps.


Of course my same backpack has not seen the use yours has, but thus far there have been no issues.

I cannot say the same for that Major Surplus military issue jacket. Since colder temperatures have set in, it has become a daily wearer and is not holding up to such use.

Appears to be stitched poorly. Thus far the issues are isolated to the d-rings and cuffs. Even with nothing ever having been attached to them, the d-ring stitching is coming loose on the tabs that attach the rings to the jacket. If I had been using them, I would have likely lost whatever had been attached to them. The first one that came off was found lying by my entry door. At first I thought "what did this come from". Then realized it was off the jacket. The stitching on the rest of the d-rings is also poor, as well as the stitching that secures the Velcro around the cuffs is unraveling. I expect the Velcro straps will soon fall off if I do not reinforce them prior.


The threads that have come loose on the backpack are so far only about 3 or 4 stitches on the left foam padded belt at the top where it meets the backpack. The nylon strap that runs down the front of the pads however is still fine and this is what actually holds the weight.

It could be the way I have been taking on and removing the backpack too since I normally do it the same way every time and it has put stress on this joint area.

Anyway will pick up some hd thread soon and she'll be good as new. Might add a few more stitches on the other side too just to be on the safe side.

The inclement weather jacket I got from Major's is doing just fine, I have only been using it during certain wet weather, not everyday use. Actually been like last Fall or December since I wore it. I don't consider it a Winter Jacket, need something warmer for Winter. I'll keep an eye on the stitching though. Will just manually do some sewing if need be.

I would only wear mine in the spring and fall when wet.

I have had Uniform shirts where the threads come loose and I lose the buttons. Been a common problem over the years and I just manually sew on new ones using a lot of thread and they NEVER come off after I do this.

The buttons on some bargain shirts I get from Gall's have been notorious for losing buttons. Other than that the uniform shirts have held up fine, although eventually fade in color over time.
No. 418     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Feb 11, 2016 at 12:32 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

I recently purchased an heirloom seed kit.


That's on the bucket list too.

I might just make one myself sealing them up in Mylar Bags with an oxygen absorber.

They say the humidity level when packaged had a bearing on seed life too though.


As my own personal path no longer includes prepping, I no longer buy much of such things but I did previously, so I do have heirloom seeds stored away and have even purchased such as gifts for my prepper brother.

I opted for a commercial packed kit. Supposedly contains 20 varieties of the highest quality heirloom vegetable seeds. 100 percent non-GMO, no hybrids, open-pollinated and in sealed mylar packets allowing for long term storage. Rated for 5+ years of storage at 75 Degrees F. Can survive longer if stored at lower temperatures. All harvested seeds are reusable.

The kit was only $14.95 on Amazon and shipped free.
No. 419     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Feb 11, 2016 at 4:20 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

The kit was only $14.95 on Amazon and shipped free.


I see the exact same kit I got selling for $29.95 up to $39.95 other places, and not shipped for free.
No. 420     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Feb 11, 2016 at 8:15 PM     
If something else conflicting does not come on the calendar with greater priority, two Saturdays in March I am attending out of town advanced hand gun/firearms skills training. One seminar is an advanced course for existing licensed concealed carry holders, the other is training for active shooter situations. These are being taught by a Krav Maga black belt Marine that is certified in training Military and Law Enforcement.

Then in April I am tentatively on the schedule to attend two full days of seminars on Knife vs Knife, Knife 3rd party, Blunt Object vs Knife, and Home Invasion. These are being taught by the Founder and Chief Instructor of Krav Maga Worldwide. This guy is one of the highest-ranked Krav Maga instructors in the world having received extensive training directly from Imi Lichtenfeld, the creator of Krav Maga.
No. 421     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Feb 12, 2016 at 8:58 PM     
Here's another one i'm considering, a large Monkeypak that coems with a 2.5 liter bladder.

What concerns me though is they do not specify the size or material denier thickness/weight.

Other than that I like the fact that it has plenty of MOLLE webbing all the way around, back, sides, bottom, even the padded belt which is removable and you can use it on it's own with various MOLLE accessories attached to it.

Only $59.95 and free shipping. I would get it in Black of course.

http://monkeypaks.net/products/large-us-military-army-style-hip-backpack-by-monkey-paks-with-2-5l-water-bladder-system-acu



No. 422     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Feb 20, 2016 at 4:39 PM     
I purchased one of these this week. It is a compact CO2 inflator for bicycle tires. Being this model fits both Presta and Schrader valves, and provides a control regulator, I am sure it can be used for other than bicycle tubes in a pinch.



It is available on Amazon Deal of Day today with the leather cartridge sleeve for $16.99 shipped free:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002YEFY8I?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
No. 423     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Feb 27, 2016 at 6:55 PM     
Here's something that I had not considered a 'survival' vehicle but looks like a great idea!



More pics and story -
http://blog.seaeagle.com/2016/02/26/isups-to-the-rescue-sea-eagle-paddleboards-turned-flood-disaster-into-a-happy-experience/
No. 424     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Feb 27, 2016 at 8:01 PM     
I sell Seaeagle's entire line of inflatable kayaks, canoes, boats, sailboats, paddleboards, etc.
No. 425     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Mar 9, 2016 at 2:29 AM     
I just got done sewing the seam that had split open on the side of my Tactical Backpack.

I used a little $1.00 travel sewing kit from Family Dollar.

I used 4 threads wide, then went back over the seam again with 2 more threads wide.

Took me about 30 minutes to do it. And had the use the 2 safety pins that came with the kit to hold 3 pieces of material in place while I sewed.

Was kinda tricky.

I doubt that seam will burst anytime soon.

Also resewed 1 button back on a Uniform shirt that came off a few months back. I placed it in a top pocket of the shirt and it was still in there lol.
No. 426     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Mar 15, 2016 at 11:09 PM     
I ordered 3 cases of Mountain House emergency/survival prepackaged foods. 90 servings at $1.74 per serving. It is a mixed assortment of just about every individual packed meals they offer.

I am really not familiar with this brand, but the ratings I have read are very good. Many even tote this brand as a regular convenient healthy meal alternative versus only being for emergencies and/or such as camping.

If I like the stuff, I am considering becoming an affiliate and/or reseller of their products. I already have a following that regularly purchase prepper/survival type items from me.
No. 427     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Mar 15, 2016 at 11:15 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

I ordered 3 cases of Mountain House emergency/survival prepackaged foods. 90 servings at $1.74 per serving. It is a mixed assortment of just about every individual packed meals they offer.

I am really not familiar with this brand, but the ratings I have read are very good. Many even tote this brand as a regular convenient healthy meal alternative versus only being for emergencies and/or such as camping.

If I like the stuff, I am considering becoming an affiliate and/or reseller of their products. I already have a following that regularly purchase prepper/survival type items from me.


Mountain House has been around a long time and was actually one of the first companies to offer freeze dried foods.

Backpackers have been using their products for years.

You can usually find some Mountain House products in the Camping sections at Walmart & Gander Mountain, Cabela's, and other sporting goods stores.
No. 428     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Mar 20, 2016 at 12:37 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Here's another one i'm considering, a large Monkeypak that comes with a 2.5 liter bladder.

What concerns me though is they do not specify the size or material denier thickness/weight.

Other than that I like the fact that it has plenty of MOLLE webbing all the way around, back, sides, bottom, even the padded belt which is removable and you can use it on it's own with various MOLLE accessories attached to it.

Only $59.95 and free shipping. I would get it in Black of course.

http://monkeypaks.net/products/large-us-military-army-style-hip-backpack-by-monkey-paks-with-2-5l-water-bladder-system-acu





Ok I just ordered this Monkeypak Backpack in Black. It should be bigger I think than the current NcStar one I have been wearing daily to work and back.

Plus TONS of MOLLE webbing for adding future pouches, Magazine Holders, EMT Pouch, Water Bottle Holder, Riot & Crowd Control Sized Pepper Spray Pouches etc.

I like the much wider and thicker padded hip belt which should take much of the weight off my shoulders and spine which sometimes bothers me slightly if I pack too much weight in it, and keep it on the hips where it belongs.

Especially on longer Hiking trips.

It should hold more weight too thus hold up better and longer.

I don't want to overdue it with this lighter duty NcStar pack.

I'll leave it for lighter duty use.
No. 429     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Mar 22, 2016 at 1:43 PM     
The Monkeypak arrived today via US Mail. That was fast! I ordered it Sunday night, it was shipped out Sunday night about midnight from Indiana, then to Wisconsin, and dropped off here at 1:00pm.

It is a little taller than the NcStar backpack I have been wearing everyday.

The wide hip belt fits around my hips perfectly, like it should!

The NcStar one had a 2" belt but wasn't padded, and it seemed to fit around my stomach rather than my hips. :sick:

This should place the weight on my hips now for a much more comfortable feel and not on my back/spine like the other one did.

This one does not have 4 little built in side pouches like the other one so will have to buy a few accessory pouches to place on the sides.

It has 2 emergency release buckles by your chest for your shoulder straps so if you want or need to drop it in a hurry you can without fiddling with taking your arms out of the shoulder straps.

The Hydration bladder comes with a long, heavy duty well protected tube and mouthpiece. Don't know if i'll use it except for maybe on long Hikes in Summer or something, but not back and forth to work everyday. I'll take it out until then.

Transferred all my stuff into it just now so will be wearing it when I go to work today.

So far it looks pretty good! :ban_dance:
No. 430     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Mar 23, 2016 at 8:58 AM     
There is a be prepared/survival expo being held this Saturday about an hour from me. Would like to fit it into the schedule.
No. 431     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Mar 23, 2016 at 6:21 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

There is a be prepared/survival expo being held this Saturday about an hour from me. Would like to fit it into the schedule.


Got the details today. It is pretty much an all day event, 9-5. But you do not have to attend all activities. I pre-registered.

"The Great Lakes Emergency Preparedness Expo is back again! The show will be on March 26, 2016 at the Birch Run Expo Center in Birch Run, MI. This show is full of survival gear, options for living off the grid, self-sustainability, farming, alternative energy, literature and much more! Our exhibitors will have many products for sale and there will be speakers who are experts in their field there to share their knowledge. The show is a must-attend for anybody looking for ways to keep their home and family safe, from those new to preparedness to hardcore prepping enthusiasts. Check out our website at www.glepe.com for information on exhibitors and speakers. See us on Facebook and Twitter! Check back regularly as we continue to add more."

glepe.com
No. 432     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Mar 23, 2016 at 6:28 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

There is a be prepared/survival expo being held this Saturday about an hour from me. Would like to fit it into the schedule.


Got the details today. It is pretty much an all day event, 9-5. But you do not have to attend all activities. I pre-registered.

"The Great Lakes Emergency Preparedness Expo is back again! The show will be on March 26, 2016 at the Birch Run Expo Center in Birch Run, MI. This show is full of survival gear, options for living off the grid, self-sustainability, farming, alternative energy, literature and much more! Our exhibitors will have many products for sale and there will be speakers who are experts in their field there to share their knowledge. The show is a must-attend for anybody looking for ways to keep their home and family safe, from those new to preparedness to hardcore prepping enthusiasts. Check out our website at www.glepe.com for information on exhibitors and speakers. See us on Facebook and Twitter! Check back regularly as we continue to add more."

{url]www.glepe.com[/url}


That sounds interesting, though somewhat of a drive (I say that having just driven to Miami and back, all within a week, lol). Yet my S-10 is ailing from my Miami trip and needs to visit a mechanic before taking anything longer than a local trip. Too bad. Timing is everything.
No. 433     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Mar 23, 2016 at 6:37 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

There is a be prepared/survival expo being held this Saturday about an hour from me. Would like to fit it into the schedule.


Got the details today. It is pretty much an all day event, 9-5. But you do not have to attend all activities. I pre-registered.

"The Great Lakes Emergency Preparedness Expo is back again! The show will be on March 26, 2016 at the Birch Run Expo Center in Birch Run, MI. This show is full of survival gear, options for living off the grid, self-sustainability, farming, alternative energy, literature and much more! Our exhibitors will have many products for sale and there will be speakers who are experts in their field there to share their knowledge. The show is a must-attend for anybody looking for ways to keep their home and family safe, from those new to preparedness to hardcore prepping enthusiasts. Check out our website at www.glepe.com for information on exhibitors and speakers. See us on Facebook and Twitter! Check back regularly as we continue to add more."

{url]www.glepe.com[/url}


That sounds interesting, though somewhat of a drive (I say that having just driven to Miami and back, all within a week, lol). Yet my S-10 is ailing from my Miami trip and needs to visit a mechanic before taking anything longer than a local trip. Too bad. Timing is everything.


Apparently this is not the only opportunity being presented by these guys. I already got an email of other events. They are hosting another such expo in June. I am kind of pressed for time this weekend. I may only do about half this one, and return in June for another half.

The June event is in Mason, MI at the Ingham County Fairgrounds.
No. 434     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Mar 23, 2016 at 7:36 PM     
Am noticing both pluses and minuses about this new Monkeypak backback.

Minuses:

1. The Sternum strap which goes across your chest holding the 2 shoulder straps together rides too high practically choking me. The NcStar backpack did this as well.

This one is not adjustable vertically, just horizontally.

The NcStar one I was able to remove and lower about 4". Can't do that with this one.

I may removed the one on the NcStar and place it on this one.

2. This Monkeypak is slightly narrower in width than the NcStar one and I notice it is more difficult to get the Netbook in and out.

Once the cold Weather passes though I will no longer have extra clothing in it stuffed to the gills so should be easier to get things in and out after that.

Plus after ordering and adding a few external pouches I can place many things that are currently inside on the outside of the pack thus freeing up more room inside.

3. The zippers, as expected being new are stiff and difficult to work with. The NcStar when new had the same problem though but as time went on with using them they loosened up and were much easier to use.

4. No small compartments like the NcStar had. Not really an issue though since external pouches are readily available from a number of Manufacturers including Monkeypak.

So far these are the only complaints I can see with this new Monkeypak.

Pluses:

1. The Pack is about 2" taller than the NcStar so is much more comfortable carrying due to the hip belt resting on my hips instead of my stomach.

I have a long trunk/upper torso so sometimes find it difficult to comfortably use these smaller backpacks.

2. The Hip Belt is padded, not too thick but very wide, maybe 4-5" with 3 rows of MOLLE loops all over it for attaching accessory puches.

It is even removable and can be used on it's own along with some pouches as a stand alone hip belt for concealed carry, canteen, watter bottle, First Aid Kit, etc.

3. It has more MOLLE loops everywhere all over the Backpack, even on top! One could really load this baby up with additional pouches and increase it's carrying and organiztional ability.

That's one nice thing about a Tactical Backpack like this, you can expand upon it to an almost infinite array and sizes of pouches.

4. The Zipper seams are completely covered over with material so the rain runs off of the edge and not into the zipper seam. With the NcStar zipper seams they are somewhat exposed to the elements and the material opening is a slit above the zipper.

So this design Monkeypak looks better for keeping the rain out of the pak.

5. The material looks thicker than the NcStar pak. Not sure though, and the Material Denier weight/thickness is not specified in Monkeypak's website for this particular pak.

I would have to place them side by side and feel the material and look at them to see if there is a difference. I think there is.

6. Shipping was ultrafast having ordered it Sunday night and it arrived Teusday via USPS.

7. It came with a 2.5Liter Hydration Bladder and thick protected hose, mouthpiece. Don't know how much i'll use that maybe in Summer on long day hikes.

I kinda prefer a water bottle and will order a water bottle carrier from NcStar for attachment to the outside of this pak. That will free up much room inside the pak.

8. FREE Shipping on orders over $30.

So far i'm quite happy with the $60 I paid for it. Monkeypak gets a 3 thumbs up from me!

http://monkeypaks.com/

No. 435     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 53   on  Mar 23, 2016 at 7:46 PM     
Monkeypaks also sells a set of 2 small MOLLE accessory pouches for only $9.97 for both. That's less than $5 each and hard to beat that price!

Comes in 3 different color schemes, Black, Tan, or Digital ACU.

I'll likely order a few sets to organize those pesky small items that always seem to get lost and impossible to find if placed in the larger compartments.



http://monkeypaks.net/collections/military-tactical-accessories
No. 436     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Mar 26, 2016 at 6:49 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

There is a be prepared/survival expo being held this Saturday about an hour from me. Would like to fit it into the schedule.


Got the details today. It is pretty much an all day event, 9-5. But you do not have to attend all activities. I pre-registered.

"The Great Lakes Emergency Preparedness Expo is back again! The show will be on March 26, 2016 at the Birch Run Expo Center in Birch Run, MI. This show is full of survival gear, options for living off the grid, self-sustainability, farming, alternative energy, literature and much more! Our exhibitors will have many products for sale and there will be speakers who are experts in their field there to share their knowledge. The show is a must-attend for anybody looking for ways to keep their home and family safe, from those new to preparedness to hardcore prepping enthusiasts. Check out our website at www.glepe.com for information on exhibitors and speakers. See us on Facebook and Twitter! Check back regularly as we continue to add more."

glepe.com


Well, I am up and preparing to hit the road. Doors open at like 9AM. I do not think the first speaker/seminar is until 10AM.
No. 437     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Mar 29, 2016 at 2:23 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:That sounds interesting, though somewhat of a drive (I say that having just driven to Miami and back, all within a week, lol). Yet my S-10 is ailing from my Miami trip and needs to visit a mechanic before taking anything longer than a local trip. Too bad. Timing is everything.


As soon as I can review my notes and collect my thoughts, I will post some comments. I found it so interesting I stayed all day, not just half the day as planned. And still intend to hit the next one.

For me personally, the vendors were not all that impressive. Most of what they are toting as the best gear, education, etc., I already have the basics including the top brands being toted. Other than I do not have a set of body armor or a cross bow, and I am not currently a HAM or much into use of essential oils.

The speaker at the top of every hour was the most interesting aspect of the program. Although most, but not all, had a table also toting their own wares and/or programs.

One of the speakers was from your neck of the woods Storm. His name is Tom Laskowski. Founder and director of Midwest Native Skills Institute. His talk was short but interesting. Looking later online, I found that in some realms his survival training school in Cleveland is ranked in the top five in the USA. In fact, most the folks/vendors there were able to provide some credentials and/or notoriety ranking them amongst the best and most knowledgeable in their fields.

SurvivalSchool.com
No. 438     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Mar 29, 2016 at 3:26 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:



One of the speakers was from your neck of the woods Storm. His name is Tom Laskowski. Founder and director of Midwest Native Skills Institute. His talk was short but interesting. Looking later online, I found that in some realms his survival training school in Cleveland is ranked in the top five in the USA. In fact, most the folks/vendors there were able to provide some credentials and/or notoriety ranking them amongst the best and most knowledgeable in their fields.

SurvivalSchool.com


I know that guy. I met him at a seminar he gave to a (Cleveland) local farm owned by a guy whose family dated from the Revolutionary War days. A bunch of people would meet there periodically, about half of them prepper-based and the other half Tea Party types.

My brother and I would travel there for the meetings, and the farm itself was very interesting. It kind of fell off after awhile but Tom came once or twice to conduct seminars.

I still have a blast-match I purchased from him.
No. 439     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Mar 29, 2016 at 3:35 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:



One of the speakers was from your neck of the woods Storm. His name is Tom Laskowski. Founder and director of Midwest Native Skills Institute. His talk was short but interesting. Looking later online, I found that in some realms his survival training school in Cleveland is ranked in the top five in the USA. In fact, most the folks/vendors there were able to provide some credentials and/or notoriety ranking them amongst the best and most knowledgeable in their fields.

SurvivalSchool.com


I know that guy. I met him at a seminar he gave to a (Cleveland) local farm owned by a guy whose family dated from the Revolutionary War days. A bunch of people would meet there periodically, about half of them prepper-based and the other half Tea Party types.

My brother and I would travel there for the meetings, and the farm itself was very interesting. It kind of fell off after awhile but Tom came once or twice to conduct seminars.

I still have a blast-match I purchased from him.


LOL. He did demonstrate at least four methods to get a fire going, one being a blast-match. But I did not see him selling any items at his table. Appeared to only be promoting his classes/school and answering questions.
No. 440     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 2:02 AM     
Well I ordered $88 worth of MOLLE Accessory Pouches from Monkeypak and Evike.

2 small pouches from Monkeypak plus a water bottle holder from their website.

From Evike:

1 x Phantom MOLLE Multi-Purpose Handheld FRS Radio MOLLE Pouch - Black U3-242 Y9-M11 Y6-M13 L1-M17 (Pouch-MA56-BK) = $6.36



Phantom MOLLE Multi-Purpose Handheld FRS Radio MOLLE Pouch - Black

Features:

Hook and loop flap closure
Shock cord with lock keeps radio secure
Fits most commercial FRS and GMRS radios
Made from durable ballistic nylon
Attaches to most MOLLE platforms
Dimensions: 4" x 2" x 1.5"
Color: Black
Material: Ballistic nylon

Got the above radio case for my Baofeng Ham Radio. It has the FM Band in it too so I can listen to music while hiking.

1 x Condor 4" MOD Strap - Set of 4 / Black Y0-447 (ACC-223-BK) = $5.95

Straps for certain pouches.

1 x Condor MOLLE and Duty Belt Mounted Handcuff Pouch (Black) U3-191 (Pouch-MA47-BK) = $8.95



Description:
- Hook & Loop closure with pull tab.
- Holds two sets of handcuffs.
- Multiple carrying options:
> MOLLE
> Belt
> Carabiner

1 x Condor Large Utility / General Purpose Pouch (Black) U3-218 U6-M10 (Pouch-MA53-BK) = $11.95 8" x 8" x 2.5"



The above will hold 6 M4 Magazines. But that's not what I bought it for. I got it for small books, munchies, etc. It has 2" x 3" Velcro on the back for holding patches such as Flags, or whatever.

1 x Condor Pocket Pouch w/ Free US Patch - Black U3-085 (Pouch-MA16-BK) = $10.95



One of condor's most popular day-to-day pouch. Carries your essentials such as pen, passport, tools, light and documents. A personal favorite pouch of ours because of it's practicality.

- MOLLE / Belt ready.
- Free Velcro USA flag patch
- Three internal pockets
- A fold-out Vinyl sleeve w/padded back (fits a 30G Ipod Video)
- Built in pen loops for 5 pens or similar shape tools.
- Large pocket for passport, shot record, orders and various paperwork.
- Memory stick / LED light lanyard.
- Soft felt backing for ipod and other electronics.

Size: 7 1/4" H x 5" W
No. 441     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 2:40 AM     
Went to Walmart today to do some shopping and finally got a good rainsuit.

The pants are mostly what I was after but it comes with both jacket and pants.

I got one of the more expensive Frog Toggs, ultralightweight, and very breathable. I think the whole suit weights 16 oz and is compact. I can keep it in my backpack all the time.

Not crazy about the color, grey, but they were out of Navy Blue so it'll do.

I got a chance to use them as soon as I walked out of Walmart it started pouring rain so I took the pants out and was able to get them on without even taking my shoes off. Perfect! I got a size XL/2XL, a bit large for me but I figured since it has a waist drawstring and bungee lockball they should fit and stay up ok. They do. And I have move room inside too.

These are much better than the old sweaty and heavy nylon PVC rain suits I had years ago.

This hi tech 3 layer material breathes MUCH better yet is guaranteed 100% waterproof!

The model I got was $28+

Frog Toggs makes a huge line of raingear: https://www.froggtoggsraingear.com/Suits.shtm
No. 442     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 2:50 AM     
This new Monkeypak Backpack is definitely made out of a heavier grade material than the VISM McStar one was.

The NcStar was 600 Denier.

This Monkeypak is 1000 Denier and it looks and feels more like a law enforcement/Military grade Backpack.

It should hold up a long time and hold a lot more weight even ammo, etc.

Well worth the $60 and has the most MOLLE loops for future expansion I have seen yet!
No. 443     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 9:31 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:I got one of the more expensive Frog Toggs, ultralightweight, and very breathable. I think the whole suit weights 16 oz and is compact. I can keep it in my backpack all the time.


For what you can readily buy off the local shelf, I find Frog Toggs to be best. Although they have sufficed for the immediate need at the time, I have wasted some money on lower quality brands.
No. 444     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 8:13 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:I got one of the more expensive Frog Toggs, ultralightweight, and very breathable. I think the whole suit weights 16 oz and is compact. I can keep it in my backpack all the time.


For what you can readily buy off the local shelf, I find Frog Toggs to be best. Although they have sufficed for the immediate need at the time, I have wasted some money on lower quality brands.


I wore it this morning in a heavy downpour after getting off the Bus to go home and again walking to the Bus to head back to work this afternoon.

It works great!

The rain jacket has huge side pockets! Large enough to hold a lunch, a few .45's even' lol. Even a survival kit or a radio.
No. 445     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 8:24 PM     
I ran across this Crider brand Chicken Bologna a few weeks back at Family Dollar. It is 11oz a fairly large sized can and is good for maybe 3-4 servings. It has no pork in it whatsoever, only chicken. This is a good and cheap way to add and store some low fat meat/lunchmeat to your emergency rations and they don't require any refrigeration.

It actually tasted just like Bologna!

It is made in Georgia.

Here is their website: http://criderfoods.com/

The cans are only $1.00!

You can order them in bulk by the case through Dollar Tree also in cases of 12 and have them shipped to your house. They likely have them in their stores also.

https://www.dollartree.com/Crider-Chicken-Bologna-11-oz-Cans/p357012/index.pro

No. 446     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 8:27 PM     
not bad, 11 ounces, thats 1 serving for me
but thats OK
No. 447     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 8:37 PM     
crayons wrote:

not bad, 11 ounces, thats 1 serving for me
but thats OK


I ate mine with crackers and some mustard, yes, the whole can. I was just estimating how many sandwiches one could likely make out of 1 can.

Will eat it on bread next time.

Could cut it up in chunks and add it to stews, soups, chili's, salads, also.
No. 448     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 8:50 PM     
This Bologna would probably be good fried too.
No. 449     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 8:55 PM     
i found some dried garlic
and egg noodle shells, like sea shells
and all i had to add was a little bit of butter
and a couple cups of water and it swelled up nicely.

filled me up.

69 cents a package at aldis,
No. 450     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 9:08 PM     
crayons wrote:

i found some dried garlic
and egg noodle shells, like sea shells
and all i had to add was a little bit of butter
and a couple cups of water and it swelled up nicely.

filled me up.

69 cents a package at aldis,


Add some diced chicken bologna to it and some cheese and you're all set!
No. 451     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 1, 2016 at 11:22 PM     
Bought 6 more cans of the Chicken Bologna tonight so now have 10 cans socked away. I would have got more, but only so much room in the backpack until the pouches arrive. Only 3 cans left on the shelf.

Will have to see if the family Dollar by home has these too.
No. 452     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Apr 2, 2016 at 9:53 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:I got one of the more expensive Frog Toggs, ultralightweight, and very breathable. I think the whole suit weights 16 oz and is compact. I can keep it in my backpack all the time.


For what you can readily buy off the local shelf, I find Frog Toggs to be best. Although they have sufficed for the immediate need at the time, I have wasted some money on lower quality brands.


I wore it this morning in a heavy downpour after getting off the Bus to go home and again walking to the Bus to head back to work this afternoon.

It works great!

The rain jacket has huge side pockets! Large enough to hold a lunch, a few .45's even' lol. Even a survival kit or a radio.


I have a Frog Toggs military green poncho that will be in my field bag for Sunday's tactical firearms class. It is like a 5 hour class and some rain is expected. The range has indoor and outdoor ranges, but the class involves some outdoor tactics regardless of weather.

I do intend to stop today and get a new pant and jacket set of Frog Toggs or stop at Gander Mountain and get the military/law enforcement tactical set they have on sale right now. Whatever I bring, the class requirements specify weather resistant and layers that allow unrestricted movement. Although all my 3rd party tactical wear such as my 5.11 brand are water repellant, I cannot say such for my military issue wear.
No. 453     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Apr 2, 2016 at 9:58 AM     
BTW - My local Gander Mountain right now has an offer for the Frogg Toggs Ultra Lite2 Rain Suit for only $19.99 and you also get a free $20 gift card.
No. 454     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Apr 3, 2016 at 10:45 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

BTW - My local Gander Mountain right now has an offer for the Frogg Toggs Ultra Lite2 Rain Suit for only $19.99 and you also get a free $20 gift card.


I did purchase the Frogg Toggs Ultra Lite2 jacket and pants set, as well a spare Frogg Toggs poncho. I already have a couple Frogg Toggs ponchos kept in various bags/backpacks/cars/suit cases.

Gander Mountain also had a sale on their Guide Series Thundercloud TechH2O jacket and pants, which appear a little better made than Frogg Toggs and have more features than the Frogg Toggs set.

Also on sale at Gander Mountain was their Trail Climber Essentials 5" hiking/tactical type boots. I purchased a pair. Regular price was like $90 but they had them on sale for $44. I actually intended to buy a new pair of 5.11 tactical boots on sale for $90, but they were out of stock in my size.
No. 455     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 5, 2016 at 5:16 AM     
One of the MOLLE pouches I ordered should should be able to accommodate the Frog Toggs rainsuit. If not i'll order one just for that purpose so I will always have it when carrying this backpack.
No. 456     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 7, 2016 at 3:48 PM     
The MOLLE pouches I ordered from Evike arrived this morning.

I one rectangular side pouch has a removable velcro "subdued green and black" Flag patch on it. I removed that and will order a subdued silver and black" patch sometime for it.

This pouch unzips on 3 sides and then you can open it like a book and fold it flat.

It has a number of webs in it and other slots maybe 4 of them for inserting cellphones, USB cords, and one section that will hold a number of pens and pencils, mini flashlights, etc.

It also has 2 attached cords about a foot long inside for attaching keys or something so they don't get lost.

Quite a versatile little pouch! I may order another one to match the other side of the pack.

The big pouch which can hold 6 AR 30 round magazines is "expandable" and has a shock cord which holds the contents tight. It also has 2 buckles which hold the flap down. Looks like it's made of maybe 1000 Denier material.

I'll use it to stuff the Rain Jacket and Pants in though instead and strap it to the back of the backpack.

The radio pouch also has an expandable pocket with a bungee cord, as well as a flap and buckle.

The Handcuff case looks rugged too and will hold 2 pairs of cuffs.

This Condor brand stuff looks pretty good and should last a lonbg time.
No. 457     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 7, 2016 at 7:42 PM     
I did not have time to re-fold my rain jacket and pants so it would fit into the large MOLLE pouch so I stuffed my First Aid kit that I have had in the backpack into it instead.

It fits perfectly into the pouch, just the right size. So for now it will remain there until or unless needed. It is a fairly large sized portable First Aid Kit in it's own zippered red pouch.

I have been adding various First Aid supplies to it as I acquire them. It still has a lot of room left in it.
No. 458     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Apr 15, 2016 at 11:48 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Bought 6 more cans of the Chicken Bologna tonight so now have 10 cans socked away. I would have got more, but only so much room in the backpack until the pouches arrive. Only 3 cans left on the shelf.

Will have to see if the family Dollar by home has these too.


I bought 4 more cans tonight. I think I have a total of 14 or 15 now.

These cans of Bologna could come in handy if used to Barter and trade for other food and goods in the event of a collapse.

"Meat" type stuff would likely be harder to come by as most meat requires refrigeration. So this could likely be fairly easy to trade to others who want to make some easy sandwiches, etc.

I'm going to make it a point to try and purchase some of this stuff every payday.

To me the price is pretty low, and should be higher. As more of us in the prepping field figure out about this Bologna and begin clearing it off the shelves I suspect the price will go up.
No. 459     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Apr 16, 2016 at 7:58 PM     
I am recently reading more and more survival articles that state if we were to ever really have a serious nationwide survival incident, firearms ammo will become the most valuable commodity, and a gunsmith the most sought after skill. One article stated a box of 22 ammo will be worth thousands of fiat dollars or its equivalent.

I am also seeing "hand to hand" combat skills now being ranked in the top 5 of necessary survival skills, with Krav Maga ranked as the most effective style.

Access to digital currencies are supposedly becoming as important or more so than any precious metal. Just heard such on the radio this evening. Even though many are now backed with printed credentials or by some other physical proof, a convenient medium of exchange without Internet service is an obstacle to overcome. Speaking of such, on the radio today I heard an ad promoting that Bitcoin is now somehow being used to pay for purchases at Amazon.com, and you get a 25% discount for doing so. I typically receive at least a 15% discount, free shipping, and/or other fees waived when I purchase with Bitcoin at select vendors.
No. 460     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Apr 16, 2016 at 8:13 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

I am recently reading more and more survival articles that state if we were to ever really have a serious nationwide survival incident, firearms ammo will become the most valuable commodity, and a gunsmith the most sought after skill. One article stated a box of 22 ammo will be worth thousands of fiat dollars or its equivalent.

I am also seeing "hand to hand" combat skills now being ranked in the top 5 of necessary survival skills, with Krav Maga ranked as the most effective style.

Access to digital currencies are supposedly becoming as important or more so than any precious metal. Just heard such on the radio this evening. Even though many are now backed with printed credentials or by some other physical proof, a convenient medium of exchange without Internet service is an obstacle to overcome. Speaking of such, on the radio today I heard an ad promoting that Bitcoin is now somehow being used to pay for purchases at Amazon.com, and you get a 25% discount for doing so. I typically receive at least a 15% discount, free shipping, and/or other fees waived when I purchase with Bitcoin at select vendors.


Bricks of .22 have been mentioned many times in prepper circles as a good after-collapse medium of exchange.

The government, recognizing the value of block-chain technology (like Bitcoin) is coming out with its own 'bitcoin,' called RScoin. It may give them even more control of not only money, but people.
No. 461     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  May 20, 2016 at 7:36 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

The government, recognizing the value of block-chain technology (like Bitcoin) is coming out with its own 'bitcoin,' called RScoin. It may give them even more control of not only money, but people.


With Bitcoin value back up to were as it can more than pay for itself, I have fired a couple miners up before the hot summer months. I typically take the BTC return and purchase silver with it, getting a discount for paying with BTC.
No. 462     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  May 20, 2016 at 8:43 PM     
Currently mining at CEX.io. One of the few still successfully operating open mining pools.

I am actually part owner of P2P BTC mining pool. Of course I mine that pool when up and running, but we have been down a couple days now with a server upgrade issue.
No. 463     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  May 20, 2016 at 8:47 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:
I am actually part owner of P2P BTC mining pool.


I should actually reword that. I own more than one seat on the "exchange". Same as if you may own a seat on a stock market exchange, but you do not actually own the exchange.
No. 464     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Lissa5246   Gender: F   Age: 57   on  May 20, 2016 at 10:28 PM     
You know Storm I had never thought about this but I have been doing a lot of reading about EMPs and it would be so easy for another country to do this to us and so now every time I go out I am adding to my stockpile. I have spring water and it is very protected so that is one problem I would not have. But I have ordered purifing pills from Israel, just in case. My kids thought at first I was insane but now they are doing it. I live well off the grid right now, up a holler and on the backside of a mountain. So I already know how to can and store food and also I have always had things like emergency lights but I have added to it. Lots of candles and things like that. Camp stove and plenty of fuel and just this week I have finished my bug-out bag. I travel and I want to be as prepared as I possible can. If I ever get stuck out on the road I want to be able to come home. Medical supplies like antibiotics, you can buy as many as you want in Mexico. I started small and it has grown. I would dearly love to have a wood cook stove, hopefully later on in the year.

Or if marshal law is declared and this is not as far fetched as some people may think, I want to be ready. I'm still learning as I go and some things are well out of my price range. But even if it's a blizzard, one time up here our power was off for 5 weeks, I will be prepared. A lot of things that they say you would need in a disaster is basically common sense. You need shelter, water, heat and food. At the same time, books and of course your Bible, very important. And maybe most important of all, able to defend and protect yourself and your family. So am I a NUT? Probably

I don't spend all my time worrying about weather the world will end tomorrow, I live a normal life I am not a fanactic, but if you know what hits the fan I will be ready.
No. 465     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  May 20, 2016 at 11:14 PM     
Lissa5246 wrote:

And maybe most important of all, able to defend and protect yourself and your family. So am I a NUT? Probably

I don't spend all my time worrying about weather the world will end tomorrow, I live a normal life I am not a fanactic, but if you know what hits the fan I will be ready.


And that is the story of the people of our country the first 100 yrs. of the United States. People were not brought up with the idea that the government will take care of you, like they are today...even Christians.

Instead, they knew that the times were not always certain, and that things like weapons, and stored food, and a garden, and two-legged varmits as well as four, were all things well-considered.

You're not a nut - you're an American...the original kind!
No. 466     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Lissa5246   Gender: F   Age: 57   on  May 21, 2016 at 12:26 AM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Lissa5246 wrote:

And maybe most important of all, able to defend and protect yourself and your family. So am I a NUT? Probably

I don't spend all my time worrying about weather the world will end tomorrow, I live a normal life I am not a fanactic, but if you know what hits the fan I will be ready.


And that is the story of the people of our country the first 100 yrs. of the United States. People were not brought up with the idea that the government will take care of you, like they are today...even Christians.

Instead, they knew that the times were not always certain, and that things like weapons, and stored food, and a garden, and two-legged varmits as well as four, were all things well-considered.

You're not a nut - you're an American...the original kind!
Thank you, this Forum has been very interesting, as I said I am learning more every day, I am very interested in solar power and have a lot to learn as of yet, I do have hand crank radios and also am getting a CB radio soon, Also have ordered some faraway bags and reading all I can on the subject. Buying ammo and also canning jars, As of now I could make it with 9 other people maybe 6 months, when I get to a year I will slow down. Also looking into getting an older truck.
No. 467     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  May 31, 2016 at 2:22 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

I am recently reading more and more survival articles that state if we were to ever really have a serious nationwide survival incident, firearms ammo will become the most valuable commodity, and a gunsmith the most sought after skill. One article stated a box of 22 ammo will be worth thousands of fiat dollars or its equivalent.

I am also seeing "hand to hand" combat skills now being ranked in the top 5 of necessary survival skills, with Krav Maga ranked as the most effective style.

Access to digital currencies are supposedly becoming as important or more so than any precious metal. Just heard such on the radio this evening. Even though many are now backed with printed credentials or by some other physical proof, a convenient medium of exchange without Internet service is an obstacle to overcome. Speaking of such, on the radio today I heard an ad promoting that Bitcoin is now somehow being used to pay for purchases at Amazon.com, and you get a 25% discount for doing so. I typically receive at least a 15% discount, free shipping, and/or other fees waived when I purchase with Bitcoin at select vendors.


I had bought boxes of 500 - .22LR Ammo back when it was often on sale for only $9.95. I should have bought it by the case at those prices!

Then the .22 shortage hit, and prices for them skyrocketed.

Now you can't touch .22LR anywhere near $10 a box. Those days are long gone.

I have a BitPay account and use a few plugins for it on some shopping carts and other online venues but no one has actually paid using it as yet.
No. 468     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  May 31, 2016 at 2:31 PM     
Lissa5246 wrote:

Thank you, this Forum has been very interesting, as I said I am learning more every day, I am very interested in solar power and have a lot to learn as of yet, I do have hand crank radios and also am getting a CB radio soon, Also have ordered some faraway bags and reading all I can on the subject. Buying ammo and also canning jars, As of now I could make it with 9 other people maybe 6 months, when I get to a year I will slow down. Also looking into getting an older truck.


Getting an older Truck that does not have all the electronics in it like today's vehicles is smart. That means one must pretty much look at vehicles made in the early 1970's or earlier. They have a "points" based electrical spark system and no electronic discharge system, simply a coil.

By the late 1970's, vehicles were starting to use electronics in them such as capacitive discharge systems (which use lots of electronics) and i'm not talking about the AM radio either!

If or when an EMP were to strike the USA you can kiss most vehicles goodbye! They will be toast and simply won't work, they'll fry!
No. 469     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  May 31, 2016 at 4:21 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

I am recently reading more and more survival articles that state if we were to ever really have a serious nationwide survival incident, firearms ammo will become the most valuable commodity, and a gunsmith the most sought after skill. One article stated a box of 22 ammo will be worth thousands of fiat dollars or its equivalent.

I am also seeing "hand to hand" combat skills now being ranked in the top 5 of necessary survival skills, with Krav Maga ranked as the most effective style.

Access to digital currencies are supposedly becoming as important or more so than any precious metal. Just heard such on the radio this evening. Even though many are now backed with printed credentials or by some other physical proof, a convenient medium of exchange without Internet service is an obstacle to overcome. Speaking of such, on the radio today I heard an ad promoting that Bitcoin is now somehow being used to pay for purchases at Amazon.com, and you get a 25% discount for doing so. I typically receive at least a 15% discount, free shipping, and/or other fees waived when I purchase with Bitcoin at select vendors.


I had bought boxes of 500 - .22LR Ammo back when it was often on sale for only $9.95. I should have bought it by the case at those prices!

Then the .22 shortage hit, and prices for them skyrocketed.

Now you can't touch .22LR anywhere near $10 a box. Those days are long gone.

I have a BitPay account and use a few plugins for it on some shopping carts and other online venues but no one has actually paid using it as yet.


I have had several online Buyers pay me with digital currencies. Most simply paying me directly with Bitcoin via Coinbase.
No. 470     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  May 31, 2016 at 5:48 PM     
Haven't seen .22LR bricks for a long, long time (thank you, Obama), but I did buy several when I could and still have them. .22LR has often mentioned as good bartering material and if I were staying here I would be regretting I didn't have even more.
No. 471     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  May 31, 2016 at 6:11 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

The Monkeypak arrived today via US Mail. That was fast! I ordered it Sunday night, it was shipped out Sunday night about midnight from Indiana, then to Wisconsin, and dropped off here at 1:00pm.

It is a little taller than the NcStar backpack I have been wearing everyday.

The wide hip belt fits around my hips perfectly, like it should!

The NcStar one had a 2" belt but wasn't padded, and it seemed to fit around my stomach rather than my hips. :sick:

This should place the weight on my hips now for a much more comfortable feel and not on my back/spine like the other one did.

This one does not have 4 little built in side pouches like the other one so will have to buy a few accessory pouches to place on the sides.

It has 2 emergency release buckles by your chest for your shoulder straps so if you want or need to drop it in a hurry you can without fiddling with taking your arms out of the shoulder straps.

The Hydration bladder comes with a long, heavy duty well protected tube and mouthpiece. Don't know if i'll use it except for maybe on long Hikes in Summer or something, but not back and forth to work everyday. I'll take it out until then.

Transferred all my stuff into it just now so will be wearing it when I go to work today.

So far it looks pretty good! :ban_dance:


Ok after 2 months of daily use going to work back and forth 5 days per week and Hiking many miles as well with it I had a seam fail on this new Monkeypak Tactical Backpack.

Last week when I went to slide my arm through the left shoulder strap I felt something wasn't right at the bottom left shoulder strap where it attaches to the backpack.

It had some play in it. I normally slide my right arm in first, then the left one. Due to the way I do this it does put more stress on the left shoulder strap.

I inspected the attachment point on the lower left strap and found the threads had come loose and were missing on about half of the stitch. Glad I found it before heading back to work and it failed completely.

It looked like they could have put the end of the strap into the little pocket another half inch or so, then stitch it in an "X" pattern instead of the "L" shaped pattern they used.

So I stitched it up and used an "X" pattern. I doubt it will ever come loose again in my lifetime.

The right strap stitching was just fine, but it likely doesn't receive as much stress due to the way I put my backpack on.

Other than that all the rest of the backpack is holding up just fine.

It DID fail the Thunderstorm test though last week when water got into the backpack, likely through the zipper seams and caused quite a mess of any paper items in there.

Temporarily ruined the mini netbook too.

A box of Mac N Cheese had dissolved and there was Macaroni everywhere inside, some of it got wet and made imprints on my Uniform Shirt.

I had to take everything out and stick a fan up next to the backpack and dry it all out.

A light or even medium rain it will withstand. The rain beads up, and rolls off. The material is waterproof on the inside.

A heavy downpour water will find it's way in, likely through the aippers even though they are covered with material.

A Backpack cover would likely have prevented this. Still have to order one.

And I did buy a good $16 collapsible Umbrella at Walgreens since the above mishap.

I did use it during one Thunderstorm and had it over my head and backpack. We both survived with no water getting inside.
No. 472     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  May 31, 2016 at 7:04 PM     
Lissa5246 wrote:
As of now I could make it with 9 other people maybe 6 months


http://www.preppergroups.com/
No. 473     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Lissa5246   Gender: F   Age: 57   on  May 31, 2016 at 9:49 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Haven't seen .22LR bricks for a long, long time (thank you, Obama), but I did buy several when I could and still have them. .22LR has often mentioned as good bartering material and if I were staying here I would be regretting I didn't have even more.


Here in Tennessee you can only buy 2 boxes of a 100 .22LR at a time I paid $14.95 a box the other day. You have to sign your name to buy them and you can't buy but 2 boxes a month.
No. 474     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Lissa5246   Gender: F   Age: 57   on  May 31, 2016 at 10:02 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Lissa5246 wrote:
As of now I could make it with 9 other people maybe 6 months


http://www.preppergroups.com/



I will go into this site when I have time to fully explore it, thanks Storm. I did read some and I am prepping for my family, I am very wise when I buy and I do not order from a lot of the sites about prepping on the internet. One the stuff is expensive and two you have to pay shipping. I can find a lot of stuff right here near me as we are a farming community. Old timey tools I have plenty of from plows to saws to axes because I got all my grandparents stuff when they passed away and I held on to it. A lot of my food is homegrown and I can, also I buy rice and flour and sugar in bulk. I have found out since I started this, it's very easy to have a lot of money (of which I don't have) in anything to do with prepping. So I shop carefully. Amazon is a good place to buy but even there you have to be careful.
No. 475     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Lissa5246   Gender: F   Age: 57   on  May 31, 2016 at 10:07 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Lissa5246 wrote:

Thank you, this Forum has been very interesting, as I said I am learning more every day, I am very interested in solar power and have a lot to learn as of yet, I do have hand crank radios and also am getting a CB radio soon, Also have ordered some faraway bags and reading all I can on the subject. Buying ammo and also canning jars, As of now I could make it with 9 other people maybe 6 months, when I get to a year I will slow down. Also looking into getting an older truck.


Getting an older Truck that does not have all the electronics in it like today's vehicles is smart. That means one must pretty much look at vehicles made in the early 1970's or earlier. They have a "points" based electrical spark system and no electronic discharge system, simply a coil.

By the late 1970's, vehicles were starting to use electronics in them such as capacitive discharge systems (which use lots of electronics) and i'm not talking about the AM radio either!

If or when an EMP were to strike the USA you can kiss most vehicles goodbye! They will be toast and simply won't work, they'll fry!


My son has a 64 Chevy Impala and we are looking for a truck, a lot of his friends have vintage trucks we figured if we have two. We would be alright.
No. 476     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  May 31, 2016 at 10:13 PM     
Shsshh, we get it.
No. 477     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CarolineIsland828   Gender: F   Age: 57   on  May 31, 2016 at 10:39 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:


I am also seeing "hand to hand" combat skills now being ranked in the top 5 of necessary survival skills, with Krav Maga ranked as the most effective style.

.


Krav maga is awesome! I'm planning on getting into a class after I have my knee surgery.

As for skills, I'm a retired paramedic and I'm trying to keep up on my skills plus adding wilderness survival medicine to my knowledge base. I'm also starting to gather up some medical supplies. I also am storing some food supplies but the medical is my main focus on prepping.
No. 478     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CarolineIsland828   Gender: F   Age: 57   on  May 31, 2016 at 10:43 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:



Getting an older Truck that does not have all the electronics in it like today's vehicles is smart.


That's another one of my goals! My daughter and I are also looking at some remote land - she's a hard core prepper/survivalist. I'm sort of middle of the road, but do keep my medical skills current.

On the BITCOIN idea: Wouldn't this be worthless in the case of an EMP or an economic crash? Don't you need internet and electricity to access that?

I like the idea of gold and good old American cash better.
No. 479     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CarolineIsland828   Gender: F   Age: 57   on  May 31, 2016 at 10:44 PM     
And for food, I make a lot of purchases at Sam's Club. Bags of rice and beans, flour, cooking oil, etc. They have great prices in bulk items like that.
No. 480     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Jun 1, 2016 at 9:50 AM     
Lissa5246 wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:

Lissa5246 wrote:
As of now I could make it with 9 other people maybe 6 months


http://www.preppergroups.com/



I will go into this site when I have time to fully explore it, thanks Storm. I did read some and I am prepping for my family, I am very wise when I buy and I do not order from a lot of the sites about prepping on the internet. One the stuff is expensive and two you have to pay shipping. I can find a lot of stuff right here near me as we are a farming community. Old timey tools I have plenty of from plows to saws to axes because I got all my grandparents stuff when they passed away and I held on to it. A lot of my food is homegrown and I can, also I buy rice and flour and sugar in bulk. I have found out since I started this, it's very easy to have a lot of money (of which I don't have) in anything to do with prepping. So I shop carefully. Amazon is a good place to buy but even there you have to be careful.


To be clear, the site I linked to is about finding like-minded people in the same general area you live.
No. 481     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Jun 1, 2016 at 10:01 AM     
CarolineIsland828 wrote:



On the BITCOIN idea: Wouldn't this be worthless in the case of an EMP or an economic crash? Don't you need internet and electricity to access that?


Bitcoin is becoming more and more accepted as time goes on, but you make a legitimate point. That's why the word 'diversification' should be part of any investment strategy.


I like the idea of gold and good old American cash better.


I see that you've been checking out previous threads. I'd recommend two of my own, which I attempt to keep current -

Do you have a Plan B...or a Plan Zero?
http://www.meetchristians.com/php/fr_view_thread.php?TID=1479807&F=2&p=1&rp=160

Sensible (Plan B) Investing
http://www.meetchristians.com/php/fr_view_thread.php?TID=1485849&F=2&p=1&rp=10
No. 482     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Jun 1, 2016 at 2:13 PM     
CarolineIsland828 wrote:

On the BITCOIN idea: Wouldn't this be worthless in the case of an EMP or an economic crash? Don't you need internet and electricity to access that?



Not necessarily. Digital access is the most convenient means of transfer, but many of the most popular digital currencies now offer physical means via a coin, token, certificate, document, etc. that represent digital currency holdings. Can be obtained in increments and exchanged as simply as handing the physical representation to someone.
No. 483     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 1, 2016 at 2:31 PM     
CarolineIsland828 wrote:

I like the idea of gold and good old American cash better.


Actually American cash may not be so good in the event of an economic collapse.

It is good to keep some on hand but do not keep most of your money in American Cash.

If the value of the dollar crashes and hyperinflation sets in you will find a loaf of bread may cost $10 or more!

The $100 in your pocket may only buy $20 worth of goods.

Your so called hard earned dollars buying power may burn up overnight!

This has already happened and is happening in various countries.

Think, "Barter" items. Buy and keep items that can easily be traded for other items of value.

Things like 1,000 sheet rolls of toilet paper, Water Filters, Canned Foods, things like that.
No. 484     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 4, 2016 at 10:42 AM     
Well the right lower strap of the backpack failed yesterday just as I was walking into the Bus/Train station. It couldn't have happened at a more convenient place or time.

Thankfully I carry one of those little $1 emergency sewing kits at all times so I stitched it up and within 15 minutes I was back in business and still made my Bus I was waiting for in time too!

Those cheap sewing kits I am now convinced are worth their weight in gold! Should this have happened in a different place it could have posed a real problem!

I do have to remove all the other little spools of thread though that I have no use for. For example I generally only need dark navy blue and black thread and that's about it. I have no use for pink, purple, red, yellow, etc... I'll just keep those at home.
No. 485     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 8, 2016 at 4:11 AM     
"I'd put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power! I hope we don't have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that." - Thomas Edison, 1931
No. 486     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  123john62   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jun 8, 2016 at 8:11 AM     



Bullfighter wrote:
""I'd put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of power! I hope we don't have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that." - Thomas Edison, 1931@

Thanks for that great quote, Bullfighter.

May God bless you.




No. 487     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  123john62   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jun 8, 2016 at 8:28 AM     

Bullfighter279 wrote:

"Getting an older Truck that does not have all the electronics in it like today's vehicles is smart."

The best all-around, practical and most reliable truck that you can buy is an old Toyota Hilux pick-up. For non-computerized electronic and easy repair, go for the pre-1984 models. Solid front-axles and an unstoppable chain driven 22R engine that never quits,

If you want to see how good they are, go on YouTube and key in "Indestructible truck, TopGear". The British car magazine/TV show did a program on trying to destroy a '97 Toyota Hilux by throwing it off a hi-rise building, setting it on fire, letting it be taken into the sea at high tide, etc. ..... but the truck just kept running. Unbelievable!

That truck was a 1997 but if you get the pre-1984 version, it's even better with solid front axles that can go pretty much anywhere and the famous, super-reliable 22R 4 cylinder engine and no computerized electronics whatsoever so it's just about repairable with nothing more than a few screwdrivers and a hammer.

No. 488     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  123john62   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jun 8, 2016 at 8:33 AM     


Stormchaser wrote:
"To be clear, the site I linked to is about finding like-minded people in the same general area you live."

If you look at all the data, the state of Idaho is the place that presently ranks top in this in the USA.





No. 489     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 27, 2016 at 8:33 PM     
Ok after 2 months the Monkeypak 3 day assault Backpack had the lower left shoulder strap fail, then 1 week later the lower right one failed, luckily as I was walking into th Train/Bus Station. I sewed it on the spot before the next Bus came.

Then 1 week after that the upper right 1" wide webbing which is used for reinforcing and is attached to the Backpack/Shoulder strap failed.

2 weeks later I am still using the pack though with no problem and the shoulder strap is still attached. It is just the reinforcement webbing on top of that that failed.

Have to sew that back on some time, will need a thimble for that being I have to sew through at least 4 layers of materials.


I have come to the conclusion I simply need a heavier duty Military Grade Backpack!!!

I do already have at least a dozen Medium and I think one or two large Military Surplus ALICE Backpacks including frames but they are simply too large for carrying to work and back. Great for camping though!

I am now looking at Fox Outdoor's line of 1200 Denier material Backpacks and have narrowed it down to 2 different models.

Over 130 of their products are recommended by the NTOA, the "National Tactical Officer's Association". Their products are used by SWAT Teams and the Military around the world. They have been in business for 30 years.

They are definitely pricier than the Monkeypak I have but are more Military grade with the 1200 Denier material weight.

This one here looks promising, "STEALTH RECONNAISSANCE PACK". Available in multiple colors but I would be getting it in Black. It has carry handles on both the top and sides and plenty of MOLLE loops on both the sides and back for future expansion and adding on of pouches:

https://www.foxoutdoor.com/ItemDetails2015.aspx?cid=1&ccid=1&cscid=1002



25.5" Tall x 15" Wide x 10.5" Deep. 4.8lbs. Cost is about $98.99.

That is about 5" Taller than my current Backpack. That should make the padded hip belt rest around my hips where it belongs and not around my stomach like my current pack does.

A good backpack the weight should rest on your, "Hips" and NOT on your shoulder straps! My current Monkeypak the weight seems more on my shoulders ugh! That's why the straps failed!

Or maybe this one by Fox Outdoors as well. "ADVANCED MOUNTAINEERING PACK": https://www.foxoutdoor.com/SearchResults2015.aspx?search=mountaineering



It too is 25.5" Tall x 15" Wide x 10.5" Deep but has one big compartment. And looks to have more MOLLE Loops on it. Heavier than their Stealth pack @ 6lbs. Cost is $99.99.

I would not call it a "Mountaineering Pack" though. That is stretching it a bit. I already have a Mountaineering Backpack and it is considerably larger than this! (34" Tall)
No. 490     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 27, 2016 at 8:44 PM     
Or I could spend even more $ and go with a 5.11 Backpack which uses 1600 Denier Material. Makes for a heavier Backpack but one that could carry more weight and hold up longer.

My Monkeypak's "material" is holding up just fine however.

The problem is the pack is too "short" for my trunk and the hip belt rests around my stomach rather than hips. The weight seems to rest on my shoulders because of that.

That is the reason the 3 strap points failed.

So I need a taller backpack to solve the problem!
No. 491     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jun 27, 2016 at 10:01 PM     
you must be in shape, here in the heat a flak vest could be
enough to put you down, today 100 with heat index of 111.

the best time to exceed the speed limit/drive over 90
is when its real hot, HWY patrols dont want to mess with you
at peak heat times.
No. 492     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 12:19 PM     
crayons wrote:

you must be in shape, here in the heat a flak vest could be
enough to put you down, today 100 with heat index of 111.

the best time to exceed the speed limit/drive over 90
is when its real hot, HWY patrols dont want to mess with you
at peak heat times.


Oh I don't wear any flak vests. But I do have 2 bullet proof vests. I haven't worn them in years though, they are simply too hot!!! I wore them on some high risk sites.

Where I am currently working has had some gunfire a block away, even some shootings and murders. But they seem to keep it amongst themselves thus far and not shooting the general public.

I do wear a medium sized backpack everyday to and from work and around town before work killing off a few hours. Especially on weekends. I usually will do work on the computer either in the parks or in various businesses cooling off.

Someday the Backpack is heavier than others depending on how much food and or clothing I carry in it.
No. 493     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 12:39 PM     
I found a GREAT site that has all kinds of materials and fabrics for making your own Backpacks, Sleeping Bags, Winter Parkas, Sails, even Socks! Other types of clothing, Boat Furniture coverings, etc.

They also sell all the hardware and repair parts used for making Backpacks, Buckles, D Rings, Hooks, Zippers, etc.

Even plans and patterns for making your own Camping gear!

I have thought about making my own Sails for a future Sailboat being Sails are so $$$$.

Would need to invest in a suitable Sewing Machine though.

http://seattlefabrics.com/products.html

My Great Grandfather from PEI Canada was a Tailor back in the late 1800's and early 1900's. He was also a Lumber Baron, lol. He settled in Duluth, MN and had a 160 Acre Farm up towards the Boundary Waters Canoe Area about 10 miles North of Two Harbors. That's where he had his Lumber/Logging Operations. He had a number of logging contracts on many properties in the area up there. He would take the Train back and forth from Duluth to there. The Rail line is long gone now having pulled up rails in the early part of the century. And the Town he had the Farm at is now a Ghost Town, nothing remains except evidence of old Root Cellars.


No. 494     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 12:43 PM     
They also sell a number of different, "Repair Kits" for Tents, Sleeping Bags, Clothing, Backpacks, etc. Even all the various Camo colors.

http://seattlefabrics.com/goretex_fabric_repair_kit.htm
No. 495     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 1:08 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Lissa5246 wrote:

Thank you, this Forum has been very interesting, as I said I am learning more every day, I am very interested in solar power and have a lot to learn as of yet, I do have hand crank radios and also am getting a CB radio soon, Also have ordered some faraway bags and reading all I can on the subject. Buying ammo and also canning jars, As of now I could make it with 9 other people maybe 6 months, when I get to a year I will slow down. Also looking into getting an older truck.


Getting an older Truck that does not have all the electronics in it like today's vehicles is smart. That means one must pretty much look at vehicles made in the early 1970's or earlier. They have a "points" based electrical spark system and no electronic discharge system, simply a coil.

By the late 1970's, vehicles were starting to use electronics in them such as capacitive discharge systems (which use lots of electronics) and i'm not talking about the AM radio either!

If or when an EMP were to strike the USA you can kiss most vehicles goodbye! They will be toast and simply won't work, they'll fry!


My 1997 Dodge Cummins Diesel has no electronics at all... except for the radio.

It is EMP proof.



No. 496     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 1:37 PM     
Mission_Specialist wrote:

My 1997 Dodge Cummins Diesel has no electronics at all... except for the radio.

It is EMP proof.



Usually with such a vast array of "sensors" like your vehicle has, as do all vehicles made in '97 there is a "computer" somewhere that is required to read them all.

Your year, make and model has one, an ECM, (Electronic Control Module) unless you have installed a VERY old engine or something in it and ripped out all the new electronics and sensors.

A google search indicates the one in yours is very expensive, $300+.

ECM's have computer chips in them. And those are definitely vulnerable to EMP's.

Here's all your sensors:

http://puredieselpower.com/dodge-products/2nd-gen-12v-94-98/electronics-and-sensors/

Get a Haynes Service Manual for your make and model and you'll find it.

Often times they are hidden WAY up under the passenger side dash in an inaccessible place.

Most vehicles these days have more than 1 type of electronic module, sometimes 3 or 4 or even more.

Sometimes some of them are in the engine compartment as well. Or mounted on the side of the engine.
No. 497     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 3:17 PM     
After seeing the price of Backpacks and the one that would fit my needs costing $100 I thought, "Can I just make or modify one instead???"

The link I posted earlier of Seattle Fabrics sells the same waterproof material that store bought MOLLE Backpacks are made of.

Here's another thought...I could buy a cheap top loading Duffle Bag either new or surplus and simply modify it. Sew on my own MOLLE loops, and a good waist belt. Many models are available which already have padded shoulder straps.

Here's a link on making your own Outdoor Gear, lots of links on the left column for making your own sleeping bags, backpacks, tents, stoves, cookware, accessories, etc:

http://www.backpacking.net/makegear.html
No. 498     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 7:12 PM     
Yes you can buy your very own razor wire. If that doesn't keep those pesky kids out of your garden nothing will!

Just be sure your liability insurance policy is up to date! :laugh:

This is surplus, pretty cheap too. 5 - 50' rolls for only $30.

http://www.gunnyssurplus.com/razor-tape-wire.html

No. 499     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 7:47 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Mission_Specialist wrote:

My 1997 Dodge Cummins Diesel has no electronics at all... except for the radio.

It is EMP proof.



Usually with such a vast array of "sensors" like your vehicle has, as do all vehicles made in '97 there is a "computer" somewhere that is required to read them all.

Your year, make and model has one, an ECM, (Electronic Control Module) unless you have installed a VERY old engine or something in it and ripped out all the new electronics and sensors.

A google search indicates the one in yours is very expensive, $300+.

ECM's have computer chips in them. And those are definitely vulnerable to EMP's.

Here's all your sensors:

http://puredieselpower.com/dodge-products/2nd-gen-12v-94-98/electronics-and-sensors/

Get a Haynes Service Manual for your make and model and you'll find it.

Often times they are hidden WAY up under the passenger side dash in an inaccessible place.

Most vehicles these days have more than 1 type of electronic module, sometimes 3 or 4 or even more.

Sometimes some of them are in the engine compartment as well. Or mounted on the side of the engine.


i could find cheaper oem ecm for that year , i have been told since its just a little electronic control module it is emp
proof if the battery has been disconnected when the blast occurs, i have the real EMP stuff and i still keep the batteries disconnected as well...

that bein said i buy diesel dodges especialeeeeee those models,

feel free to PM me.
since it is omly
No. 500     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 28, 2016 at 8:42 PM     
crayons wrote:

i could find cheaper oem ecm for that year , i have been told since its just a little electronic control module it is emp
proof if the battery has been disconnected when the blast occurs, i have the real EMP stuff and i still keep the batteries disconnected as well...


I don't know who told you that but I doubt it is EMP proof.

It has sensitive computer chips in it.

Simply disconnecting a battery wire will not prevent an EMP from damaging it.

It may help, but unless electronics are made from the outset and designed to be EMP proof anything else is just a crapshoot.

And even then there is no guarantee.

I'm sure modules can be had much cheaper than the one I found above. that was just what I saw on one site.

Anyway electroni9cs didn't start being introduced into the car's ignition system until about 1973 -75 depending on the Make.

Read this forum post...very informative!

Here's just one...

Cutoff Year For EMP Safe Vehicles?

http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/questions-answers-wolf-pack-cutoff-year-emp-safe-vehicles/

"...Hey Rude Dog, old guy here. I’ve been selling auto parts for about 28 years now so know a bit on the subject. Chrysler corporation went to electronic ignition in 1973, General Motors and Chrysler in 1975 model years. Actual computers started with Throttle body injection models starting around 1980, but even the older electronic ignition units were solid state units. How well they would stand up under EMP I don’t know. My suggestion would be a carburated (yes, all these years and I still can’t spell it right 🙂 vehicle, with a points style distributor. A vehicle from 75 to 80 should be able to be backwards retro-fitted from the electronic ignition to point and condenser style by any backyard mechanic. Bear in mind that this increases the level of maintenance required. Plus, when you go into the parts store, unless the guy behind the counter has grey hair like me he’s probably never heard of a Dwell Meter 🙂 Also, if you are considering a late 70’s, early 80’s GM vehicle make sure the carb. is not electronically controlled. It should be fully mechanical or you may consider a swap to an aftermarket unit like a Holley or Carter. Doing this will also make parts availability easier as most parts stores will have rebuild kits, power valves etc. in their performance department. Good luck!
Personally I am stuck driving a Honda mini-van and in an EMP I would be royally screwed because once the power is out the Transmission can’t even be shifted out of Park. One thing at a time, vehicle replacement will come when the money is available 🙂...'
No. 501     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 10:50 AM     
A good pair of boots are essential for bugging out and or having to cross uneven terrain.

My 8" high cheap tactical boots I found at Walmart are finally coming apart after a year of daily use.

The side is coming apart by the seam. Plus the inside material on the heel came loose and wore away months ago. Time to get new ones before I get a blister.

While I did not have any high expectations of them when I bought them being they were so cheap I am surprised they have lasted this long.

Anyway a good source for Tactical Boots is this company. I am leaning right now anyway towards a pair of only 6" high side zipper boots. Our company requires they be black. Certain sites require steel or safety toed boots that go up above your ankle and 6" tall ones meet that requirement.

I will not wear a low cut boot without ankle support. I can't tell you how many times I have twisted my ankle when stepping on a foreign object or even just walking doing patrols! I think I have weak ankles.

6" boots are MUCH cooler in Summer than 8" tall boots!

I will pick up a more expensive 8" tall boot before Winter sets in.

Right now, i'm going with the Ryno Gear side zip boots for only $35 or $40 to get me by for now.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/footwear/duty-tactical-boots.html?dir=asc&order=price
No. 502     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 12:05 PM     
Here is another Backpack I have been considering. It is not as tall as i'd prefer but does have some great features I really like.

It would be roomier than my current backpack since it has a square top.

This one ships directly from China and is $59.80:

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/FREE-SHIPPING-Men-Women-Unisex-Outdoor-Military-Tactical-Backpack-CampHiking-Bag-Rucksack-50L-MOLLE-Large-Big/32663836570.html?spm=2114.10010108.1000013.5.5L3fXW&scm=1007.13339.33317.0&pvid=498ad259-7149-485a-94fe-b8206cba5f52&tpp=1

It has a special outer frame and mesh back that keeps the backpack away from your back so you are cooler during hot weather. Very important during long Hikes in Summer! My back and the backpack generally get soaked in sweat in this area on longer hikes.

I like the thick padded hip belt too.




Here it is in ACU Digital Camo:



In Black or Black Python Camo.

I would be getting mine in all black of course:





The bottom part unzips and you could stuff a sleeping bag, jacket, or rainsuit, extra socks, etc in there.



Plus I like how the main compartment opens up all the way. My current one does not do that and I sometimes have to fight and hunt for items in the lower regions.



I don't buy this for one second but accept that like my current one it is, "Water resistant".

No. 503     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 102   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 12:25 PM     

I've been seeing ads for tachlights and I want one...!!!

https://www.trytaclight.com/

I don't like buying from inforcommercials because they sell info I think, but saw one on Amazon (higher price though). Even the guitar I'm considering is from another source (not the infocommericial).

I am likely waiting until more generics are made and they sell these at home depot and other popular stores (which is often within the year). The other tactical flashlights are much more expensive (been around for some time, but pricey).

I love the strobe function on this that can blind bears and human predators!







No. 504     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 12:34 PM     
I sell a vast an bewildering array of Tactical Flashlights and sometimes find it hard to keep up with them all, lol.

I use a nice hand sized one for doing patrols outside of work to look for skunks and make sure I don't bump into one. I've had a few really close calls there and in one incident him flipping his tail at me as a warning before he sprayed me.

Another time I walked right past one as he as next to a big tree and I didn't see him until I was right next to the tree.

I did NOT have a flashlight with me at the time but now keep 3 at all times so I have plenty of backups.

The front of mine has serrated edges and can be used as a self defense weapon in a worst case scenario.

It will take out chunks of flesh and cause some serious flesh wounds requiring stitches.

The one for the link you posted does not state the "Lumens" or, "Candlepower" and that raises a red flag with me. Means it could be anything!
No. 505     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 12:41 PM     
My hand sized Flashlight appears to be about the same size and style as the tachylight you posted but mine was only $6.99.

It has 3 modes, low, hi, and strobe. Button is on the end.

It has a built in lithium battery and a little battery charger you plug into the wall.

It is quite bright, I would have to go back to the website or read the instructions as to the lumens but they are substantial for a light this size.
No. 506     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 12:48 PM     
Here's where I got mine. Check these out, 5 pages worth.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?cat=0&dir=asc&order=price&q=flashlight
No. 507     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 1:12 PM     
Here's the one i've been using nightly at work. Although the ad doesn't say it it has a low beam as well as high and strobe.

I got mine when it was on sale for $6.99. It is now $9.99 but still worth that in my opinion.

Oh yeah, it "Zooms" too, wide floodlight to spotlight.

One thing though the screws on the belt clip eventually loosened up and fell out. I still have the clip so eventually will re attach it with the proper screws and some Loctite sealer to prevent them coming out again.

In the meantime no biggie since I plan on carrying it in a duty belt holster anyway.

For now I have been carrying it in a special rear side pocket on my tactical security uniform pants which have pockets on both side designed for a flashlight or collapseable baton.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/mini-600-lumens-cree-t6-led-zoomable-rechargeable-flashlight.html

I also got a 1 "AA" sized light as a backup for only $2.99. This too has all the serrated edges. And I have a number of "AA" Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries and a recharger so no problem finding batteries. It is nowhere near as bright as the above one I posted but it's just a backup.

Notice the sharp edges on this one too, top and bottom. For $2.99 it's a bargain and it has held up with use just fine.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/high-power-led-flashlight.html
No. 508     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 4:48 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

crayons wrote:

i could find cheaper oem ecm for that year , i have been told since its just a little electronic control module it is emp
proof if the battery has been disconnected when the blast occurs, i have the real EMP stuff and i still keep the batteries disconnected as well...


I don't know who told you that but I doubt it is EMP proof.

It has sensitive computer chips in it.

Simply disconnecting a battery wire will not prevent an EMP from damaging it.

It may help, but unless electronics are made from the outset and designed to be EMP proof anything else is just a crapshoot.

And even then there is no guarantee.

I'm sure modules can be had much cheaper than the one I found above. that was just what I saw on one site.

Anyway electroni9cs didn't start being introduced into the car's ignition system until about 1973 -75 depending on the Make.

Read this forum post...very informative!

Here's just one...

Cutoff Year For EMP Safe Vehicles?

http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/questions-answers-wolf-pack-cutoff-year-emp-safe-vehicles/

"...Hey Rude Dog, old guy here. I’ve been selling auto parts for about 28 years now so know a bit on the subject. Chrysler corporation went to electronic ignition in 1973, General Motors and Chrysler in 1975 model years. Actual computers started with Throttle body injection models starting around 1980, but even the older electronic ignition units were solid state units. How well they would stand up under EMP I don’t know. My suggestion would be a carburated (yes, all these years and I still can’t spell it right 🙂 vehicle, with a points style distributor. A vehicle from 75 to 80 should be able to be backwards retro-fitted from the electronic ignition to point and condenser style by any backyard mechanic. Bear in mind that this increases the level of maintenance required. Plus, when you go into the parts store, unless the guy behind the counter has grey hair like me he’s probably never heard of a Dwell Meter 🙂 Also, if you are considering a late 70’s, early 80’s GM vehicle make sure the carb. is not electronically controlled. It should be fully mechanical or you may consider a swap to an aftermarket unit like a Holley or Carter. Doing this will also make parts availability easier as most parts stores will have rebuild kits, power valves etc. in their performance department. Good luck!
Personally I am stuck driving a Honda mini-van and in an EMP I would be royally screwed because once the power is out the Transmission can’t even be shifted out of Park. One thing at a time, vehicle replacement will come when the money is available 🙂...'


the 97 manual 5 speed transmission is the last year dodge Diesel you can make EMP proof rather simply,

the ecm would not really be a factor as far as emp proofing, you may loose your lights wipers heater, those can be dealt with by using an older wiring harness.

the Heart of the 97 cummins diesel is the Mechanical Fuel Pump/Throttle quite similar setup to the military's 800 series 250 cummins enclosed fuel injection system just a lot smaller, and the lift pump being mechanical as well.

And it does not even have glow plugs it has one small heater plate that can be rewired/isolated from the ecm on a separate wire and ceramic resistor you can run to the cab installing an on off switch, once engine is started you turn the heater grid/plate off,

you can bypass the key with on/off switch and use a starter button or just buy a military toggle box. so without even getting to the lighting wiper issues your up and running entirely mechanically.

i should copyrite this.
No. 509     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 4:52 PM     


crayons wrote:
the 97 manual 5 speed dodge Diesel is the last year model you can make EMP proof rather simply,

the ecm would not really be a factor as far as emp proofing, you may lose your lights wipers heater, those can be dealt with by using an older wiring harness.

the Heart of the 97 cummins diesel is the Mechanical Fuel Pump/Throttle quite similar setup to the military's 800 series 250 cummins enclosed fuel injection system just a lot smaller, and the lift pump being mechanical as well.

And it does not even have glow plugs it has one small heater plate that can be rewired/isolated from the ecm on a separate wire and ceramic resistor you can run to the cab installing an on off switch, once engine is started you turn the heater grid/plate off,

you can bypass the key with on/off switch and use a starter button or just buy a military toggle box. so without even getting to the lighting wiper issues your up and running entirely mechanically.

i should copyrite this.

crazy edit typo it should read like this in case someone copys this and you see this all over the place.
i knew about the mechanical fuel and lift pump already
having repaired several.

but i had to go to cummins southern plains today for a bunch of parts so i went through their manuals to make
sure the heater grid/plate could be isolated, Dodge
ran the heater through the ecm but it was a dodge option to incorporate it just as it was a kaiser or am general or oshkosh option to isolate it. same principle. hope this is easier to understand.
No. 510     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 102   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 4:57 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Here's where I got mine. Check these out, 5 pages worth.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?cat=0&dir=asc&order=price&q=flashlight


Good prices! Not sure if this are tactical flashlights though. The tac can shine 2 nautical miles and the strobe can blind a predator. The one you have has an awesome LED charge though (100,000 hours)!

Did you say you sell any on your website?



No. 511     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 62   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 5:02 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:



I also got a 1 "AA" sized light as a backup for only $2.99. This too has all the serrated edges. And I have a number of "AA" Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries and a recharger so no problem finding batteries. It is nowhere near as bright as the above one I posted but it's just a backup.

Notice the sharp edges on this one too, top and bottom. For $2.99 it's a bargain and it has held up with use just fine.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/high-power-led-flashlight.html


I have a couple that I ordered that look like yours but performs like the ones CAsandie talked about. One I bought for myself, and am very happy with, and the other was for my cop brother for Christmas. Unfortunately it didn't surface at that time so he got something else and will have to wait for his birthday or next Christmas, whenever it appears, lol.
No. 512     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 7:59 PM     
Someone in this thread who posted recently has their, "Quote" tags messed up causing the thread to go wacko.

Looks like Crayon's post #509 might be the one causing it.

Can you please fix it before we have to have the webmaster do it?

Thanks!
No. 513     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 8:14 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Here's where I got mine. Check these out, 5 pages worth.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?cat=0&dir=asc&order=price&q=flashlight


Good prices! Not sure if this are tactical flashlights though. The tac can shine 2 nautical miles and the strobe can blind a predator. The one you have has an awesome LED charge though (100,000 hours)!

Did you say you sell any on your website?



Yes the majority of them are considered, "Tactical" Flashlights.

That term is highly subject to interpretation and can cover a broad range and types of gear pertaining to law enforcement.

I seriously doubt that light in the link you posted can, "Shine" 2 nautical miles. (Unless it is a true LASER) which would be highly illegal to shine into someone's eye's since they can cause permanent damage.

More likely it can be, "Seen" up to 2 nautical miles away.

My Tactical Flashlight can temporarily "blind" a human or an animal if I shone it into their eyes. It is quite bright!

The LED is predicted to last for up to 100,000 hours before burning out.

That does not mean the battery charge!

The one at the link you posted according to their ad states it has a "100,000" bulb life as well.

What I am finding suspicious is that they do NOT state the "Lumens" or, "Candlepower" of the flashlight on the site you posted!

That raises a RED FLAG and they are trying to HIDE something! Like the fact that is is just an ordinary hi powered "CREE" LED like mine.

Don't get me wrong, i'm quite sure it is a good and quality flashlight! But I have been seens LOTS of ads like this recently among various companies and many of them are "hyped" up with NO facts like that one. (No lumens or brightness #stated).

I have yet to put up all the flashlights I offer onto my websites. There are so many of them and such a wide range and the profit margin so low on the sale of most of them I have been focusing on higher ticket items. I will try and get them up later this weekend with "some" starting later tonight.
No. 514     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 8:41 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Someone in this thread who posted recently has their, "Quote" tags messed up causing the thread to go wacko.

Looks like Crayon's post #509 might be the one causing it.

Can you please fix it before we have to have the webmaster do it?

Thanks!
had to delete your/bullriders post. 4th time & still cant
get it purrfect.

webmaster? maybe goober fema totem heads...

randal seems to have gone deep underground, anyone heard from him lately?

No. 515     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 29, 2016 at 8:55 PM     
crayons wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Someone in this thread who posted recently has their, "Quote" tags messed up causing the thread to go wacko.

Looks like Crayon's post #509 might be the one causing it.

Can you please fix it before we have to have the webmaster do it?

Thanks!
had to delete your/bullriders post. 4th time & still cant
get it purrfect.

webmaster? maybe goober fema totem heads...

randal seems to have gone deep underground, anyone heard from him lately?



Yes it's fixed now thanks!
No. 516     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jun 30, 2016 at 1:21 AM     
Here's a guy who shows you how to make your own Backpacking straps.

Fairly professional looking too!

https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/41835/
No. 517     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Aug 12, 2016 at 7:03 PM     
Same as BF, I recently added this to my gear:

No. 518     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Aug 12, 2016 at 7:05 PM     
This week I added two of these:

No. 519     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 56   on  Aug 16, 2016 at 7:34 PM     
I bought me a portable propane grill from Aldi but have been disappointed with the quality of it.
No. 520     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Aug 23, 2016 at 7:40 PM     
I have purchased so many new survival/prepper related items over the past few days, I am not sure what to share first.
No. 521     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Aug 23, 2016 at 7:42 PM     
insular926 wrote:

I bought me a portable propane grill from Aldi but have been disappointed with the quality of it.


When purchased from Aldi, if it is not name brand or simply paper goods such as paper plates and napkins, it is of poor quality.
No. 522     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 1, 2016 at 9:27 PM     
My current Tactical Boots I got from Walmart over a year ago are shot. They are coming apart at the seams and have holes in them.

So I just ordered a new pair of Tactical Boots from The Sportsman's Guide, HQ brand, for only $54. They are waterproof and have side zippers. 2 features I really wanted.

They have a steel shank also to help prevent against those Pungee sticks and nails.

231 reviews by buyers give them a 4.5 star rating.

"HQ ISSUE Men's Side Zip Tactical Boots, Waterproof, Black"

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/hq-issue-mens-side-zip-tactical-boots-waterproof-black?a=1564514

I will likely get a pair of insulated Tactical Boots in a few months for colder weather.
No. 523     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 9, 2016 at 1:52 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

My current Tactical Boots I got from Walmart over a year ago are shot. They are coming apart at the seams and have holes in them.

So I just ordered a new pair of Tactical Boots from The Sportsman's Guide, HQ brand, for only $54. They are waterproof and have side zippers. 2 features I really wanted.

They have a steel shank also to help prevent against those Pungee sticks and nails.

231 reviews by buyers give them a 4.4 star rating.

"HQ ISSUE Men's Side Zip Tactical Boots, Waterproof, Black"

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/hq-issue-mens-side-zip-tactical-boots-waterproof-black?a=1564514

I will likely get a pair of insulated Tactical Boots in a few months for colder weather.


I must have ESP or something. :unsure:

I woke up at 1:15pm this afternoon wondering, "I wonder if my Boots have arrived yet???" They were due to arrive today according to FEDEX.

I went to me email to look for a FEDEX delivery confirmation, not delivered.

Less than 2 minutes later I heard the distinct sound of a "thud" on my deck outside my door and then a truck start up and take off a few seconds later.

"Aha! There they were outside my door"

So I took them out of the box to take a look at them. They have a tag on them that says, "100% Waterproof!" We shall see.

"Slip and Oil resistant" printed on the bottom.

These arrived in the knick of time as I don't know how much longer the year and a half old boots from Walmart would have held op with holes in the sides, side seams splitting, etc. Plus the inner sole on the right boot seemed to be caving down in a concave shape inside the boot as I walked.

These HQ brand are the Sportsman's Guide own in house brand.

Here are the specs on them from their web page, (red emphasis mine). They even have a promo video on these boots at their link:

"Lightweight, rugged and ready for anything! Inspired by the military surplus combat boots of yesteryear, these HQ ISSUE® Side-zip Tactical Boots are super-tough stompers that will chew up rough terrain with ease. They're rugged on the outside, but more comfortable than your favorite slippers on the inside. Plus, since these are our own HQ ISSUE direct-to-you brand, you get high-end quality at an everyman's price.

LONG-LASTING QUALITY AND COMFORT AT A PRICE SO LOW... IT'S PRACTICALLY STEALING!

Here at Sportsman's Guide we know that you work hard for your money. And nowadays it doesn't seem to stretch as far as it used to. So we designed these value-packed HQ ISSUE Tactical Boots to be long-lasting, comfortable, and extremely affordable. We challenge you to find Side-Zip Tactical Boots that offer the same high-end features at a lower cost. Can't find anything? That's because with HQ ISSUE you get the highest-quality materials and construction at a fraction of what other brands charge!

Suede and nylon uppers for topnotch performance and durability
Cupped rubber outsole provides sure-footed traction and is oil and slip resistant
Removable insole provides all-day comfort
Mesh lining wicks away moisture to keep your feet dry and comfortable
Padded tongue and collar for comfort
Gusseted tongue locks out debris
Steel shank provides all-day support
YKK zipper for easy on / off
For combat, security detail and more, there's no better option than the HQ ISSUE 8" Waterproof Side-zip Boots. Order yours today!
KEY SPECIFICATIONS
Color: Black
Material Type: Suede, nylon and rubber
Height: 8"
Weight per boot: 26 ozs."



While these are not insulated I should still be able to wear them through most of Winter with a thick pair of Wool socks in relative comfort before the tozies get coldeze. 2 pair of socks, 1 thin wool and an outer thicker pair of wool socks can help allieviate that problem.

If these hold up for a year or so I will be happy with them considering I subject tactical boots to a considerable amount of walking throughout the year.
No. 524     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 9, 2016 at 2:29 PM     
Me and socks that hold up tend to be allergic to each other. I tend to wear them out first producing holes in them right by my big toe. The nail tends to wear through them regardless of how well I keep the nails trimmed. Might just be the way my big toe is shaped or something.

I am gonna be ordering 10 pairs of these, "Tactical Socks" from the Sportsman's Guide next week for only $17.99. They are their own in house HQ brand. 4.6 star rating: http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/10-prs-of-hq-issue-tactical-socks?a=1744173

While not, "Wool" they look like they may hold up fairly well. I could use them for liner socks with a pair of Wool ones over them during Winter.

The "reinforced Toe" aspect is what I am looking at. I would be getting them in black.

10-Prs. of HQ ISSUE Tactical Socks

"Sock it to me, baby!" Nab 10 pairs of Crew Socks, ready for instep deployment. Designed to keep your feet comfortable over miles of rugged terrain.

Rugged 97/3 polyester / spandex fabric
Built-in cushioned arch support
Reinforced heel and toe
Strong honeycomb stitch
Comfort top keeps 'em riding high
Machine wash / dry
Imported
Fit men's sock sizes 10-12.
State Color, as available in the Shopping Cart. We listened to your comments and have made some design revisions to make these socks fit even better.

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/10-prs-of-hq-issue-tactical-socks?a=1744173
No. 525     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 9, 2016 at 2:38 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

This week I added two of these:



Yep one of those is on my wish list too, especially the one with the sutures. A number of suppliers have them.
No. 526     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 9, 2016 at 8:32 PM     
As I left home with the new boots on and headed to the first Bus stop a mile away it was raining out so that softened them a bit. The new, stiff leather was rubbing a bit on my left ankle as new boots normally do until they get broken in.

Once I got on the Buses I unzipped them and allowed air to get to my feet. Very comfy with them unzipped and I can even walk with them unzipped with no problem.

No more tying bootlaces every morning and evening! :ban_dance:
No. 527     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Sep 10, 2016 at 4:21 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:
"HQ ISSUE Men's Side Zip Tactical Boots, Waterproof, Black"


I will have to take a closer look, but they sound to be the same tactical boots I am about to purchase from Sportman's Guide.

I have had my eye set on a pair of 5.11s, but every time I attempt to get them, they are out of stock in my size. SG has a pair that sound to be equivalent to the 5.11 tactical boots, maybe even better and for less cost.
No. 528     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Sep 10, 2016 at 12:00 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
"HQ ISSUE Men's Side Zip Tactical Boots, Waterproof, Black"


I will have to take a closer look, but they sound to be the same tactical boots I am about to purchase from Sportman's Guide.

I have had my eye set on a pair of 5.11s, but every time I attempt to get them, they are out of stock in my size. SG has a pair that sound to be equivalent to the 5.11 tactical boots, maybe even better and for less cost.


Although I have yet to actually wear the SG or 5.11 side-zip tactical boots, I do have to say that my Gander Mountain fully lace hiking boots that I purchased in lieu of tactical boots a couple months ago, are a joy to wear when compared to any previous side-zip or slip-on boots I have ever worn.

Yeah, they are a "pain" to lace up each and every time you wear them, but I have yet to wear even any tennis shoe or running shoe that is as comfortable for all day wear on solid floors and concrete.

I have also never worn better socks for wear in boots than Gander Mountain's deluxe hiking socks.
No. 529     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Sep 14, 2016 at 5:04 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:
"HQ ISSUE Men's Side Zip Tactical Boots, Waterproof, Black"


I will have to take a closer look, but they sound to be the same tactical boots I am about to purchase from Sportman's Guide.

I have had my eye set on a pair of 5.11s, but every time I attempt to get them, they are out of stock in my size. SG has a pair that sound to be equivalent to the 5.11 tactical boots, maybe even better and for less cost.


I had some time to check today. SG had contacted me anyway concerning a dropship order.

Those are the exact same boots I am considering as an alternative to the 5.11 pair I dearly desired.
No. 530     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 16, 2016 at 8:37 PM     
So far, I really like these HQ side zipper tactical boots. They are softening up quite nicely.

I generally wear them unzipped while sitting and doing patrols at work.

As the weather gets colder I will likely start zipping them up but for now the my feet and socks have a chance to breathe far better with them unzipped.
No. 531     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 16, 2016 at 8:42 PM     
I found the ultimate Tactical Pants and they have more pockets than Carter has pills!

Even ankle pockets.

The pants are, "Teflon Coated" to make them stain resistant as well.

They are a polyester/cotton blend and made by Condor, same company that makes some of the MOLLE pouches I have for my backpack.

Unfortunately I ordered a pair from one company, only to find them for $10 cheaper from another company. :sick:

As soon as I receive them i'll do a mini review on them!
No. 532     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 23, 2016 at 2:45 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I found the ultimate Tactical Pants and they have more pockets than Carter has pills!

Even ankle pockets.

The pants are, "Teflon Coated" to make them stain resistant as well.

They are a polyester/cotton blend and made by Condor, same company that makes some of the MOLLE pouches I have for my backpack.

Unfortunately I ordered a pair from one company, only to find them for $10 cheaper from another company. :sick:

As soon as I receive them i'll do a mini review on them!


Well after looking at the ads again it seems I was mistaken. The one seller is not offering them for $10 cheaper.

They have a "base price" of $24.95 but when you choose the size you want it "adds" another $10 to $24.95 so they cost $34.95, same as the other seller I bought them from so I didn't lose anything.Well after looking at the ads again it seems I was mistaken. The one seller is not offering them for $10 cheaper.

They have a "base price" of $24.95 but when you choose the size you want it "adds" another $10 to $24.95 so they cost $34.95, same as the other seller I bought them from so I didn't lose anything.
No. 533     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 24, 2016 at 7:56 PM     
I found the Tactical Uniform Pants stuffed in the mailbox at home as I was leaving for work.

They were originally shipped via UPS but at some point the USPS took over to complete the delivery.

Funny how the agencies now interact with each other these days.

Anyway I changed into them in the Library Restroom.

These a really neat pants, tons of pockets, the waistband is slightly adjustable too. I had ordered a size 40" waist since they were out of size 38". A little loose around the waist but wearing a belt makes it ok.

Next time i'll order 38" once they have some in stock again.

These have 4 black plastic "D" rings attached to a strip of material just below the front and rear waist. Excellent idea for attaching a key ring to!

Probably for carrying lightweight ropes, accessories, or something.

Normally in years past I would have worn a, "Key Keeper" which attaches to a duty belt.

These things have so many pockets I can't believe it. Some side pockets even have internal pockets inside of the pockets for holding Magazines. i won't be using those for that purpose but they would fit a backup penlight flashlight or something else.

I found one of the small pockets my tactical flashlight fits into perfectly

These pants also have pockets inside the knees for slipping kneepads into. I doubt i'll use those but cool anyway.

A little "sweatier" than the cotton pants I have been wearing since these are almost all polyester but at least they wouldn't fade as easily as the cotton ones did which turned purple ick.

So far I like them!
No. 534     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 24, 2016 at 8:35 PM     
Next pants I order though will likely be the, "PolyWool" as they are called, half wool, half polyester.

Winter is approaching and wool pants are important!

Plus I want to get them before they sell out of my size!

I think they are only $15-20 a pair. Which isn't bad for Wool. All wool uniform pants are about $50-$100 plus!
No. 535     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 25, 2016 at 8:55 AM     
These new Tactical Uniform Pants II got are not all Polyester like I thought. They are 65% Polyester and 35% Cotton.

Here they are: "Condor 608: Sentinel Tactical Pants"



http://www.condoroutdoor.com/Condor-608-Sentinel-Tactical-Pants.aspx


"For the same wear and tear you go through each day. The Condor Tactical Pants are made from durable ripstop material to take the beating that you put it through, while holding all the gear you need for the mission. Equipped with pockets for your gadgets, knife, tools, extra mags, and other utilities the 608 has been said to replace whole backpacks. The baggier fit works with the heavyweight fabric to disperse the weight of the pants and your gear, so you can move comfortably without the awkward drag."


Two front hand pocket
Two wallet pocket on the back with hook & loop closure
Two open top hidden back pocket
Two knife/pen slots
Two cargo pockets with hook & loop closure and internal mag slots
Two calf pocket with hook & loop closure
Deep front pocket with coin slot and reinforced edge
Self-adjusting waistband
Internal knee pad pocket
DuPont™ Teflon® treated for stain resistance
Fade resistant
Zipper fly with button
Imported
No. 536     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 25, 2016 at 9:02 AM     
I will likely stuff a First Aid Kit into one of the many cargo pockets on these tactical Pants so I have one on me within easy reach at all times.

Maybe in one of the calf side pockets since those would be out of the way.

I am thinking of this one here. It is pocket sized and has a water resistant plastic case. I would likely add a few of my own items into it since most First Aid Kits always seem devoid of certain items I prefer.

No. 537     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 25, 2016 at 9:17 AM     
Cheaper Than Dirt sells the Knee Pad Inserts that fit in these new Tactical Pants I just got. They are only $5 a pair. At that price I think i'll go ahead and get some. I do tent to whack my knees off and on on accident lol.

https://www.cheaperthandirt.net/product/tru-spec-knee-pads-neoprene-foam-black-5959000-690104224220.do?sortby=ourPicks&refType=&from=Search

"Slip these Tru-Spec knee pads into any tactical response uniform to prevent injuries to vital limbs or joints when you drop down to cover. Crafted from soft neoprene foam, these knee inserts provide comfort and incredible protection in the field. Since they are lightweight, mobility is never restricted.

Specifications and Features:
Constructed from 100 percent Neoprene foam
Made for use in the tactical response uniform
Can be used with most uniforms made for pad inserts
Pair packaged individually with header card
Imported "

No. 538     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CarolineIsland828   Gender: F   Age: 59   on  Sep 26, 2016 at 1:23 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

These new Tactical Uniform Pants II got are not all Polyester like I thought. They are 65% Polyester and 35% Cotton.

Here they are: "Condor 608: Sentinel Tactical Pants"



http://www.condoroutdoor.com/Condor-608-Sentinel-Tactical-Pants.aspx


"For the same wear and tear you go through each day. The Condor Tactical Pants are made from durable ripstop material to take the beating that you put it through, while holding all the gear you need for the mission. Equipped with pockets for your gadgets, knife, tools, extra mags, and other utilities the 608 has been said to replace whole backpacks. The baggier fit works with the heavyweight fabric to disperse the weight of the pants and your gear, so you can move comfortably without the awkward drag."


Two front hand pocket
Two wallet pocket on the back with hook & loop closure
Two open top hidden back pocket
Two knife/pen slots
Two cargo pockets with hook & loop closure and internal mag slots
Two calf pocket with hook & loop closure
Deep front pocket with coin slot and reinforced edge
Self-adjusting waistband
Internal knee pad pocket
DuPont™ Teflon® treated for stain resistance
Fade resistant
Zipper fly with button
Imported


I have tons of tactical pants from my EMS days and I was thinking of selling them but after reading this have decided to hang on to them. Thanks.
No. 539     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 26, 2016 at 8:16 PM     
CarolineIsland828 wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

These new Tactical Uniform Pants II got are not all Polyester like I thought. They are 65% Polyester and 35% Cotton.

Here they are: "Condor 608: Sentinel Tactical Pants"



http://www.condoroutdoor.com/Condor-608-Sentinel-Tactical-Pants.aspx


"For the same wear and tear you go through each day. The Condor Tactical Pants are made from durable ripstop material to take the beating that you put it through, while holding all the gear you need for the mission. Equipped with pockets for your gadgets, knife, tools, extra mags, and other utilities the 608 has been said to replace whole backpacks. The baggier fit works with the heavyweight fabric to disperse the weight of the pants and your gear, so you can move comfortably without the awkward drag."


Two front hand pocket
Two wallet pocket on the back with hook & loop closure
Two open top hidden back pocket
Two knife/pen slots
Two cargo pockets with hook & loop closure and internal mag slots
Two calf pocket with hook & loop closure
Deep front pocket with coin slot and reinforced edge
Self-adjusting waistband
Internal knee pad pocket
DuPont™ Teflon® treated for stain resistance
Fade resistant
Zipper fly with button
Imported


I have tons of tactical pants from my EMS days and I was thinking of selling them but after reading this have decided to hang on to them. Thanks.


You never know. They might make good survival or bugout pants.

You could have some sort of catastrophic natural disaster happen in your area such as the New Madrid Fault and a major earthquake causing widespread catastrophic damage. And Scientists/Seismologists are all predicting when the New Madrid fault finally gives way, it's gonna be a big one!

A few years back an Earthquake took place where I live. I happened to be awake at the time it occurred and felt myself and the couch I was laying on moving back and forth a few feet. The epicenter was about 50 miles NW of me.

The people there close to it said it sounded like a sonic boom going off. Fortunately there were no injuries that I know of since it wasn't powerful but the shockwave was recorded hundreds of miles away even in Missouri, Michigan, etc.

You may be called upon to render your services as a good samaritan/volunteer and help treat injured people. Emergency personnel would be strapped thin for awhile anyway until reinforcements arrived, if at all.

Like during 9-11 for example when many of them were killed.

War could break out. You never know. There have already been a handful of Wars right here in the USA, Revolutionary War, War of 1812, Civil War, even during WWII the Germans were sinking out Merchant Ships right on our own shores with their subs.

The Japanese had released explosive/incendiary balloons with the intent they set American cities on fire along the west coast.

Sometimes catastrophes and Wars happen suddenly, unexpectedly taking us by surprise. Our own gov was caught with our pants down when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor destroying and sinking much of the Pacific Fleet.

America was caught by surprise when muslim terrorists hijacked 3 US commercial planes using them to murder thousands of people.

Now we have this brat in North Korea testing nukes.

What if he were to give or sell one to a rogue muslim nation or terrorist enemy hell bent on using it in the USA. It would not be all that hard to smuggle one in i'm afraid.

A large or huge Meteor could slam into your area causing thousands of casualties. Look at that huge Meteor that went through thr Russian atmosphere a fe years ago. It caught all the Scientists and Astronomers completely by surprise.

The sonic boom generated by it as it raced through earth's atmosphere at thousands of mph blasted out thousands of windows.

It flattened some buildings too.

A bigger meteor or closer to the earth could even flatten thousands of buildings, with people trapped in them.

The people there at th time thought they were under Nuclear attack by the USA.

Check out this cool video with dozens of video cameras across the area of real footage that had captured the event, and the damage it left behind: https://youtu.be/dpmXyJrs7iU

Yellowstone could pop it's cork and some Scientists are saying it's blast would affect thousands of square miles all across the USA and the world: https://youtu.be/-iGJlYgp43s

Volcanoes can injure and kill people hundreds of miles away via ash, flooding, etc. Such as Mount St Helens did: https://youtu.be/3zHgwiOK3oU

What if a large Meteor or Asteroid hit the USA again like what hit Arizona thousands of years ago?

Some people think it far fetched but keep in mind one can actually go see and visit the mile wide crater left by such an Asteroid when it hit Arizona: http://meteorcrater.com/
No. 540     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 26, 2016 at 8:53 PM     
A short 6 minute clip of a documentary of Mount St. Helens. When it popped it blasted off the top 1300' of the Mountain and left a crater a mile wide.

It was the biggest volcanic eruption in North America in more than 100 years.

With Volcani eruptions, the volcanic ash is the worst part of it as it can effect breathing hundreds of miles away for days, even weeks.

https://youtu.be/-H_HZVY1tT4

The force released in a volcanic explosion is equivalent to that released by many nuclear bombs.
No. 541     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Sep 30, 2016 at 7:20 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Me and socks that hold up tend to be allergic to each other. I tend to wear them out first producing holes in them right by my big toe. The nail tends to wear through them regardless of how well I keep the nails trimmed. Might just be the way my big toe is shaped or something.

I am gonna be ordering 10 pairs of these, "Tactical Socks" from the Sportsman's Guide next week for only $17.99. They are their own in house HQ brand. 4.6 star rating: http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/10-prs-of-hq-issue-tactical-socks?a=1744173

While not, "Wool" they look like they may hold up fairly well. I could use them for liner socks with a pair of Wool ones over them during Winter.

The "reinforced Toe" aspect is what I am looking at. I would be getting them in black.

10-Prs. of HQ ISSUE Tactical Socks

"Sock it to me, baby!" Nab 10 pairs of Crew Socks, ready for instep deployment. Designed to keep your feet comfortable over miles of rugged terrain.

Rugged 97/3 polyester / spandex fabric
Built-in cushioned arch support
Reinforced heel and toe
Strong honeycomb stitch
Comfort top keeps 'em riding high
Machine wash / dry
Imported
Fit men's sock sizes 10-12.
State Color, as available in the Shopping Cart. We listened to your comments and have made some design revisions to make these socks fit even better.

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/10-prs-of-hq-issue-tactical-socks?a=1744173


I ordered these the other day.

As well as 2 pairs of Swedish Military Surplus Wool socks in black. They were $4.05 a pair I think.

They should be here in the next few days.

Hey, i'm part Swedish so...
No. 542     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Oct 5, 2016 at 12:33 PM     
On my "to do" list is to build what's called a, "Hellcat". This extensive article with nu8merous photos shows how to assemble one:

http://libertytreeblogs.blogspot.com/2011/04/building-hellcat-hybrid-ruck-from-us.html There are YouTube videos and other articles out there also that show how to build this Hellcat system.

Basically what this is is a Hybrid ALICE pack and frame, but using modern (and more comfortable) MOLLE shoulder straps and padded waist belt.

I already have a few dozen ALICE frames as well as a dozen ALICE backpacks. I mostly have the medium size but have a few larger sized ones as well.

Picked them all up at a gov auction years ago.

So all I have to order is the MOLLE shoulder straps and waist belt and i'm all set. They are pretty much only available in Woodland or Desert Camo.

I will likely go with the Woodland Camo. All my ALICE packs and frames are Green though. But a backpack raincover can be had in many different colors, including different camo colors.

The plan is to make one and stuff it as an emergency bugout bag. Maybe keep one at home loaded and another in storage too.

That way in case something happens at home I can always get the one in storage.

Keeping one in a vehicle later too would be a good idea.

Want to pick up a few of the newer style cargo shelves for the ALICE frame as well. They are bigger than the older original ALICE shelves.

They are great for carrying heavy gear without the pack such as 5 gallon gas or water cans, etc.



Here is the older, smaller style:

http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/yhst-40864295455031_2263_89562146
No. 543     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Oct 6, 2016 at 1:54 PM     
The 10 pairs of tactical socks and 2 pairs of Swedish Military Surplus Wool socks just arrived.

I will try a pair of the tactical socks on today for work.

The Swedish Military surplus socks have cardstock attached to them written in Swedish gibberish, but they state they are made in Turkey.

They have, "Tactical" printed on the socks. They look to be a medium weight 50% Wool sock, not thin, but not real thick either. They look to be of good quality at $4 plus per pair.

I had also ordered a pack of 4 Polish Police surplus "Ditty bags" for $9.95 meant for putting toiletries and such in them to keep them organized. Such as toothbrush, toothpaste, shaving kit, etc.

They are the perfect size for holding small bottles of liquid soap, sanitizer, body powder, etc.

They would be perfect for storing a KFS set and small bottles of spices too.

They are black and appear to be made of a rubberized nylon with white vinyl liner with a divider inside.

1 out of the 3 is made of a different material, all vinyl. The other 3 are nylon on the outside.

They all have a big, "WP" imprinted on the outside.

No. 544     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  insular926   Gender: M   Age: 56   on  Oct 8, 2016 at 9:01 PM     
No. 545     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 19, 2016 at 1:17 PM     
I finally read through this entire thread. WOW! What a job.

Some information useful, some outright bogus. Some information was missing all together. I will reply point by point in different posts to keep things organized.

But before we start, some background information. I am not a prepper who believes the world will get unhinged in a single day. I do a lot of camping and hiking and I live where we get a lot of tropical storms and hurricanes, so both my needs and views will not align full with others on this thread.

Another thing is many of those who have posted here spend a lot of time worrying about HEAT. And you should because you live in the north where heat means survival during your freezing winters. But for those who live in Florida or Arizona or Texas, heat can be a killer. So we must worry more about hydration and staying cool.

Still, I think there are things I can bring to the table here that can even help those preppers amongst you be better prepared. You won't all agree with me and your mileage may vary. But there are a few points that have presented on this thread that are factually incorrect. Period. And I will address those too.

So here we go....
No. 546     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 63   on  Oct 19, 2016 at 1:43 PM     
Mission_Specialist wrote:



Still, I think there are things I can bring to the table here that can even help those preppers amongst you be better prepared. You won't all agree with me and your mileage may vary. But there are a few points that have presented on this thread that are factually incorrect. Period. And I will address those too.

So here we go....


When I first posted this thread, Steve, in the middle of 2011, it was with the idea of all of us helping each other, not from necessarily a prepper's mindset (though that was included) but from any disasters, including local and regional ones (mentioned on the OP).

FWIW, I'm sure that anyone posting with a helpful, friendly attitude, as opposed to a professorial one, will find great acceptance, whereas anyone with attitude will find poor acceptance. I look forward to any helpful information.
No. 547     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Oct 19, 2016 at 2:30 PM     
I needed a brighter flashlight at work so I can see the Skunks sooner before I get up on them.

I had a really close call with one last week. I got only 4' away from him before I spotted him. He happened to be behind the biggest bush in the area so difficult to see him until I was right up on him ugh.

A brighter flashlight would have helped.

So I ordered and just received this 3 "C" cell sized flashlight.

It is an exact duplicate almost of the smaller rechargeable one I have and use nightly. Has the serrated front edge, button on the back, super thick glass lens which adjusts from a wide flood to a pinpoint spot beam, thick aluminum body, very heavy duty Tactical flashlight.

Will fit in one of the pockets on the Tactical Pants perfectly.

This baby could definitely be used as a baton as a last resort as well. With 3 Alkaline or NMH batteries in it it has some weight to it and would pack a mean punch.

But it is definitely smaller than my $130 Streamlight flashlight which is simply too big, bulky, and heavy to be carrying around to and from the Bus/Train, Bicycle, etc.

This one seems like a fair compromise. Oh yeah, it came with 3 batteries too!

Here it is, $12.99 and a pretty tough Tactical Flashlight:

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/10w-cree-t6-led-aluminium-flashlight-41053.html
No. 548     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 7:27 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

crayons wrote:

i could find cheaper oem ecm for that year , i have been told since its just a little electronic control module it is emp
proof if the battery has been disconnected when the blast occurs, i have the real EMP stuff and i still keep the batteries disconnected as well...


I don't know who told you that but I doubt it is EMP proof.

It has sensitive computer chips in it.

Simply disconnecting a battery wire will not prevent an EMP from damaging it.

It may help, but unless electronics are made from the outset and designed to be EMP proof anything else is just a crapshoot.

And even then there is no guarantee.

I'm sure modules can be had much cheaper than the one I found above. that was just what I saw on one site.

Anyway electroni9cs didn't start being introduced into the car's ignition system until about 1973 -75 depending on the Make.

Read this forum post...very informative!

Here's just one...

Cutoff Year For EMP Safe Vehicles?

http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/questions-answers-wolf-pack-cutoff-year-emp-safe-vehicles/

"...Hey Rude Dog, old guy here. I’ve been selling auto parts for about 28 years now so know a bit on the subject. Chrysler corporation went to electronic ignition in 1973, General Motors and Chrysler in 1975 model years. Actual computers started with Throttle body injection models starting around 1980, but even the older electronic ignition units were solid state units. How well they would stand up under EMP I don’t know. My suggestion would be a carburated (yes, all these years and I still can’t spell it right 🙂 vehicle, with a points style distributor. A vehicle from 75 to 80 should be able to be backwards retro-fitted from the electronic ignition to point and condenser style by any backyard mechanic. Bear in mind that this increases the level of maintenance required. Plus, when you go into the parts store, unless the guy behind the counter has grey hair like me he’s probably never heard of a Dwell Meter 🙂 Also, if you are considering a late 70’s, early 80’s GM vehicle make sure the carb. is not electronically controlled. It should be fully mechanical or you may consider a swap to an aftermarket unit like a Holley or Carter. Doing this will also make parts availability easier as most parts stores will have rebuild kits, power valves etc. in their performance department. Good luck!
Personally I am stuck driving a Honda mini-van and in an EMP I would be royally screwed because once the power is out the Transmission can’t even be shifted out of Park. One thing at a time, vehicle replacement will come when the money is available 🙂...'


WRONG!

In 1997 the Dodge Ram 3500 came in two versions. The earlier 5.9B Cummins engine was completely mechanical. There is a warming plate on the intake [in lieu of glow plugs] but that is solenoid operated. I have been able to start the truck on days as low as 25 degrees with that system completely disconnected. It smokes a bunch until the engine warms up for a couple of minutes, but I can drive it right away.

Both the fuel pickup pump and the distribution pump are 100% mechanical.

The truck does have a computer for the ABS. Mine is currently disconnected and as such the brakes work as they do in a conventional vehicle.

For those who have the automatic transmission, there is a small circuit that regulates how that transmission shifts into fourth gear and how the torque converter locks. In the event this circuit is destroyed, it takes about 45 minutes to rig up a pair of manual switches in the cab that will perform these functions in the absence of electronics.

You want to talk about the Toyota Helix?

Yeah, it was a very durable truck. However, I bought this truck new in 1997 and it has 400,000 miles on it. Most people who have this style of Dodge easily get a million miles from them. I expect it would survive everything the Helix did in that video.

Mine has already survived incredible things including cutting a 1998 Plymouth Neon COMPLETELY in half. Short of a leaky radiator it was still fully drive-able! By the rules in your YouTube video, this truck could have been repaired enough to drive long distance with the ordinary tools allowed.

I would stack my Cummins up against that Helix or any other production car, pickup truck or SUV.

The last half of 1997 introduced the 24 valve version of the B engine and that one DID have an engine computer. Mine does not. It WOULD start directly after an EMP. It would drive.

DON'T BELIEVE EVERYTHING YOU READ ON THE INTERNET!

The source you quoted makes a LOT of assumptions and generalizations. It also states a few things inaccurately, but I won't elaborate on them here.
No. 549     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 7:31 PM     
crayons wrote:

you must be in shape, here in the heat a flak vest could be
enough to put you down, today 100 with heat index of 111.

the best time to exceed the speed limit/drive over 90
is when its real hot, HWY patrols dont want to mess with you
at peak heat times.


LOL. I seriously doubt most of those posting here would survive a week south of the Mason-Dixon line. They don't understand heat and humidity or how it can help you or kill you.

That is natural. They worry about the cold. However none of them seems to be worried about WEIGHT either, which can also kill you.
No. 550     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 7:34 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

CarolineIsland828 wrote:

On the BITCOIN idea: Wouldn't this be worthless in the case of an EMP or an economic crash? Don't you need internet and electricity to access that?



Not necessarily. Digital access is the most convenient means of transfer, but many of the most popular digital currencies now offer physical means via a coin, token, certificate, document, etc. that represent digital currency holdings. Can be obtained in increments and exchanged as simply as handing the physical representation to someone.


In your societal failure scenario, I don't think any currency would mean much, no matter what kind of certificate was attached to it. How would someone verify the veracity of the certificate? Heck , how would counterfeits even be checked.

In such cases even gold and silver will be under strain and barter will be the primary means of exchange.
No. 551     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 7:44 PM     
Jimmy98 wrote:

Keep in mind that the US power gri is like any other national system. It is not centrallly controlled but is run from regions and sub-reginns. One part of the grid could go doww, or seveal at once but others would function normally and poweer could be 'shunted' to areas that were out. This has happene seeral times before. You also have a lesser chance of losing power if you live near a hydro plant or other electric generating pllant. Not even a full scale nuclear war can blow out the entire power grid in a country the size of the US. Preparation shoul e proportional to need and preceived need and not on the notion tht the entire power grid for the entire nation can or would fail. Also, there is less chance of failure in a rural area.


Some of what you say is valid. The part about being in a rural area is not. In general, rural areas have more power failures and they also tend to last a lot longer.

When we have hurricanes down here, the rural people get fixed LAST because the power companies try to get the largest number of people power as soon as possible.

The last hurricane that affected my power left me without power for less than a day. I am on the urban grid. Just two miles away, people are on the rural grid and they went without for almost two weeks.

That pattern is not unusual.

Not only does repairing the rural grid benefit fewer people, but it is also harder to do. On my urban grid the power company was able to switch me over to an undamaged section of the grid and repair my section days later. There was no extra capacity on the rural portion so everyone had to wait for primary repairs before getting power back.
No. 552     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 7:52 PM     
Jimmy98 wrote:

This is my point about buying coins in a nutshell. Coin values always go up because the age of the coin adds to the intrinsic value of the metal snf uduslly by a wide margin.


WRONG!

The word "intrinsic" means the "internal" value of the coin.


"belonging to the essential nature or constitution of a thing"

--Meriam Webster


If you take a US $1 silver coin, hammer it, paint it, scratch it, and melt it, it is still 3/4 of an ounce of pure silver. Thus the INTRINSIC value is whatever the value of 3/4 of an ounce of silver is.

The value as a coin is EXTRINSIC - coming from the outside.

So if you have a silver dollar that trades for $50 as a coin and silver is $10 per ounce, the coin has ABOUT $7.70 of intrinsic value and about $42.30 of extrinsic value.

No. 553     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 8:13 PM     
Christian_Gent wrote:

Jimmy98 wrote:

This is my point about buying coins in a nutshell. Coin values always go up because the age of the coin adds to the intrinsic value of the metal snf uduslly by a wide margin.


Actually, you're quite incorrect since you make no distinction between "coins" and "bullion". Bullion is sold through either coins (government mints), rounds (refinery mints), or by bars (refinery mints mostly). I know since I hold all three.

What you're possibly referring to are "collector" coins or proofs which is what I, and many other reputable metal advisors, try to steer others away from because a customer is negotiating apparent value above & beyond the cost of the underlining metal. It's a game made to increase the spread of dealers rather than value to buyers. Practically ALL of the investment analyst have advised to steer away from these as I have explained on my previous post.

I have already sold 100 oz bricks before and know how spreads work related to spot price. It's an acceptable medium. However with collector coins, value is too subjective and difficult to verify purity too, on many of them. With bullion, it's on the metal itself, clear cut, easily bought & sold.





Actually the reason 'investment analysts' steer people away from collectible coins is not for that reason.

The reasons are:

1. Most investors do not have the skills necessary to evaluate the condition - and thus the market value - of collector coins.

2. Even when dealing with coins certified by one of the recognized certification agencies such as PCGS or NGC, the price can be quite volatile and predicting the value is not within the skill set of these analysts, so there are greater risks.

However, properly graded rare coins have - in most cases - performed equal to or better than conventional investments.

Having said that, I have many investor grade coins that have performed exceptionally well [FAR FAR better than stocks and mutual funds], yet I still don't recommend the investment to casual coin investors.

I have entire bookshelves dedicated to the study of numismatics and I am a COLLECTOR FIRST. Thus I enjoy a significant advantage when choosing coins by market value. On the occasion I have miscalculated [which will happen no mater what you invest in] I have still enjoyed the coins I acquired.

In reality, for someone not well educated in numismatics to invest in coins when the primary point is a monetary return, one must invest in fairly expensive and rare coins. This is because over-grading is rampant and the cost of certifying a coin to avoid the over-grading trap is about $35 to $45 depending on variables. So unless the coin is worth over $500, the time it takes to recoup the cost of certification with investment return is too long to make it a reasonable investment. On the other hand, when coins cost over $1000 or so, that can be diluted quite quickly - sometimes instantly.

However, for those who just want to enjoy a good collection, I still recommend certification unless the collector is well informed on grading a particular series.

So the analysts may 'say' certain things, but in reality they just don't have the means to deal with the complexities. The historical return on investment in better coins is actually quite good.
No. 554     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 8:16 PM     
Darrell wrote:

Jimmy98 wrote:

When I was a kid I worked at the locasl "Piggly Wiggly" grocery. One day an old lady who lived across the street came in a driving rain to do her weekly shopping. Whe was in he 80s and we always carried her things home for her since she only lived across the parkig lot. She gave me a one dollar tip. Of the four quarters she gave me, the most recently minted was 1905, U gave tehm back to her and explained that they aere quite valuable. She handed them back and told me to save them for as long as she had and one day they'd be worth even more. I still have them.



I too still have more than one piece of currency handed to me when I just a kid. Amongst one being an 1856 Flying Eagle Cent and another being an 1853 Liberty Head "V" Nickel. I have a lot of old coins and some old currencies. American and foreign.


OPPS!

Liberty head nickles were not produced until 1883 and no nickels were produced in 1853. In 1853 the five cent coin was a HALF DIME which was a silver coin that was half the weight of a dime.

The first nickle was the shield nickle and it was first released in 1866.
No. 555     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 8:19 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

A good pair of boots are essential for bugging out and or having to cross uneven terrain.

My 8" high cheap tactical boots I found at Walmart are finally coming apart after a year of daily use.

The side is coming apart by the seam. Plus the inside material on the heel came loose and wore away months ago. Time to get new ones before I get a blister.

While I did not have any high expectations of them when I bought them being they were so cheap I am surprised they have lasted this long.

Anyway a good source for Tactical Boots is this company. I am leaning right now anyway towards a pair of only 6" high side zipper boots. Our company requires they be black. Certain sites require steel or safety toed boots that go up above your ankle and 6" tall ones meet that requirement.

I will not wear a low cut boot without ankle support. I can't tell you how many times I have twisted my ankle when stepping on a foreign object or even just walking doing patrols! I think I have weak ankles.

6" boots are MUCH cooler in Summer than 8" tall boots!

I will pick up a more expensive 8" tall boot before Winter sets in.

Right now, i'm going with the Ryno Gear side zip boots for only $35 or $40 to get me by for now.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/footwear/duty-tactical-boots.html?dir=asc&order=price


I won't say you are wrong but I will say I am a skeptic. You can hardly buy decent tennis shoes on closeout for $40. You want me to believe I can buy a good boot for that?
No. 556     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 8:33 PM     
Prepping, the Mission:

As I read through the thread I was quite astonished by how little, relatively speaking, of the thread was acrtually dedicated to SURVIVAL. Much of it has been dedicated to COMFORT.

What are you prepping for? Are you simply trying to make your home comfortable in the face of a power outage? Or are you preparing for the breakdown of society?

If it is the former, then comfort can be a very valid consideration. If it is the latter, then you must be prepared for much more. In such a situation, your home may not be defensible and there is a good chance it must be abandoned.

The same can be said for a vehicle. If the vehicle is disabled because of attack, mechanical failure, or the lack of fuel, it becomes a liability and must also be abandoned.

In a catastrophic event, one must defend the home, when that becomes untenable one must retreat to a vehicle, and then to foot. In fact it may come to a point where you cannot move quickly enough to survive while dragging a “bugout pack” along. [More on bugout packs below]. In such a case, what will you carry to make it to tomorrow?

Don’t worry. When those who have chased you for your supplies have stolen your bugout pack you can circle back around that night and kill them to get your stolen supplies back. Sounds harsh? If you want to be alive in two days you better know how to be harsh.

In the event of societal collapse you will likely not be able to reach authorities to help you and if you do, it will be unlikely they will be able to help you. You really are on your own so you must decide if the good guys or the bad guys are going to survive.

In my view anyone who has tried to steal my survival supplies has made an attempt on my life. I will recover my supples and I will not hesitate to use lethal force in order to do so. That is not about being mean. That is simply choosing to survive and making that decision in light of the fact that whomever was willing to steal from me had no morals and was willing to kill me to do it.

Now I can live for DAYS or even weeks on what I can carry on my tactical belt.

Are you surprised I have a tactical belt? When I go hiking I am not walking a nature trail. Often I am far away from any human contact. I never know what I will face on these adventures so I must prepare for everything.

However, my hiking philosophy IS very survival oriented and I can take EVERYTHING I need on just one belt. The bulkiest things I carry even on long hikes in cold climates is my tent and my sleeping bag. If the weather is not cold, I can do just fine with a survival blanket which will easily tuck into a pouch on my belt. My tent, technically a two man tent, will lay on top of the sleeping bag. In this form it has virtually no bulk and weighs less than two pounds. I can set up this tent in about THREE minutes and pack it away in less than five.

Except in very cold weather, I consider my sleeping bag a luxury. So when hiking to a destination of unknown conclusion, I will carry the tent - which actually hangs off my belt in the back and I won’t bother with the sleeping bag either.

While the sleeping bag is the BULKIEST item I may carry, the heaviest is water. I will carry as much as five liters in a Camel Back type device if the climate and terain are demanding. If not, I will just carry an ordinary military canteen on my BELT. A small water purification system tucked into my belt provides hydration of that supply becomes exhausted.

I think I already sense confusion, Why does a hiker take a survival belt and no pack? Simple. Even at my age I can easily do a 25 mile hike in a day. My “mission” is usually some archeological, geographical or historic site well of the beaten path. Maybe I am visiting an abandoned ghost town, an old mine, a geographical feature. I have even hiked to mineral deposits just to collect geodes or amethyst. In any case, because I pack so light, I have often passed hikers on a trail, reached my destination, taken pictures, accomplished my task and then met the same hikers on my return trip who have not even gone 2/3 the way to the same destination I was headed to. I can cover 25 miles in the time a traditional, heavily laden hiker can cover 5 to 10.

This same skill set gives me great advantages in a survival situations.

In Vietnam, snipers would go out into the fields and jungles and survive for WEEKS on a very small pack.

So what do I carry on my belt?

A good knife.
Some basic first aid supplies
A Leatherman tool
A survival blanket.
About three ounces of alcohol
About an ounce of petroleum jelly
About an ounce of table salt
3 ounces of insect repelant
A small water purification system.
1 to 5 liters of water
[For convenience so I don’t have to stop to purify water].
A clean mechanics tool rag or a pair of handkerchiefs
A set of thin leather work gloves, like those for gardening or that a mechanic uses.
A lighter
A flint & magnesium as a backup
[Both of those are luxuries as I can start a fire without either].
About 20 meters of paracord.
3 cabiners
A small flashlight
[Another luxury. I have actually left that behind to save weight on occasion]
A compass
A lightweight semi-disposable rain poncho [It has 1000 uses].
Some monofilament line for fishing and snaring food.
Some twine (works very differently than monofilament)
[Another luxury since you can strip twine from the paracord in a pinch]
A few sheets of toilet tissue
[Another luxury but with virtually zero weight and space impacts]
A P38 can opener [regardless if I carried any food]
[This is yet another luxury, but at less than 10 grams I can afford the convenience over the knife].
A 10 power jewelers loupe
4 large Ziplock type bags.
A spare pair of socks
1 metal cup (I don’t bother with bowls, plates, or spoons)
I might bring a fork
I might bring my tent
I might bring 2 ounces of liquid soap
I might bring 2 spare magazines if I am carrying a firearm (usually I am not).

Most of the time I will carry some calorie DENSE food which usually consists of things like:
== Nuts, raisins, dates, beef jerky or some canned fish (tuna, herring, sardines, whatever) and a few ounces of hard candy. I might bring granola or breakfast bars if I can get them into the belt.

I don’t bring bread, potato chips, doughnuts or any other food that is easily squished, is bulky for the calorie content, stales easily, or becomes damaged with short exposure to water. I have been known to tote small amounts of pasta to prepare at my destination as the starch is good for long term energy in the absence of bread.

ALL of this will fit on my belt. I don’t bring extra clothes except the socks because most of these excursions are less than 24 hours and in a survival situation I don’t care if I look all pretty for the photographs. The socks are essential because if your socks get wet, it can literally cripple you if you are 20 miles up a mountain trail.

Now I DO have a pack and that is almost completely about COMFORT:

Clothing including some sandals
A stove
Bigger brighter lights
Better selection of foods
A hatchet and machete [which NOBODY mentions in the entire thread!]
A decent set of rain gear
The usual camping implements.

And NO BOOKS! More on books shortly.

I have done quite well with nothing but my belt. One time I managed to get lost in a mountainous National Park [Yosemite] and it was so dark I literally could not see the hand in front of my face. I had NOT packed my flashlight nor even a lighter as I had expected to be back long before dark. I spent hours navigating through the dark and lost my path several times. Several hours after sunset, I emerged from the woods near my car where rangers were waiting trying to figure out if someone was lost - since the car was a long way away from any campsites.

You should have seen the faces when I came rambling out of those woods! But, even if I had to give up for the night and sleep in the woods without any light, I could have done so with what I had on me. I now always keep either a flashlight OR lighter with me at least. Those woods were so dark, I would have had trouble finding what I needed to start a fire. But if I had to sleep in the dark and I could not find a way to build a fire, and assuming I could not find my way out the next day, I would have simply started a fire before dark the next night.

The moral of that lesson is not to underestimate the situation. A lot of great survivalists and soldiers have gotten into big jams by doing that. A moment of complacency can be expensive. Fortunately, mine was quite cheap.
No. 557     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 8:41 PM     
I have read much here about “bugout packs.” Much consideration has been given to how many BOOKS one will carry. Let me tell you now, the answer to that question is maybe TWO. Your Bible and maybe a field guide. Books will not survive even in moderate humidity levels. Books weigh A LOT. Books are hard to read under a moonlight or a flashlight or even a hurricane lantern. In short, with few exceptions, books will be useless.

I don’t even like Kindles in the backpack. Under the circumstances they are both bulky and fragile. At night time they can also bee seen for quite a distance, which might not be a good thing during societal collapse. This is not my first concern as I don’t really anticipate the event, but there it is for those of you who do.

My phone has 32 GB of memory and I actually have several books on it right now, including the entire New and Old Testament. A phone is lighter weight, faster to charge and in many cases much more durable than tablets or laptops. They consume A LOT less space too.

Of course the disadvantage is that they require SOME power. A couple of small external battery packs [I have about 10 of them. Very handy during hurricanes.] can keep a cell phone charged for WEEKS. But eventually, you will need a way to charge them back up.

After sitting here and thinking about this I have decided if I ever have to worry about reading at night after societal collapse I will bring my VR device with me so I can read or use my phone without casting any light at night.

BOOKS ARE HEAVY
BOOKS ARE BULKY
BOOKS WILL SLOW YOU DOWN A LOT !!!
BOOKS ARE VERY EASILY DAMAGED AND RENDERED USELESS.

People find comfort in books. In an outdoor situation, they can get you killed. They can damage your equipment [as Bullfighter has already attested to].

So once you dump the books out of your bugout pack - and made A LOT more room in it for important things to keep you alive, what do you put in it?

In my estimation, essential tools, food, medicine, clothes, fuel, ammo and barter items. Period.

Now that does not mean you can’t have a SECOND pack for your creature comforts, just so long as you are willing to abandon them in an instant. You want to carry 20 pounds of books and 5 bags of marshmallows that can’t be compressed or 5 pounds of chocolate that will melt all over EVERYTHING - including your books? You want that heavy and fragile laptop? You want those bunny slippers your mommy gave you? Cool. Just don’t ask me to carry them and don’t ask me to wait while natural or manmade dangers approach.

SCALE IT!

At my home I have lots of things that make me comfortable when Hurricane WHATSITSFACE comes to town and I am without power. I have bulky but unrefrigerated comfort foods. I got battery powered radios. I got lights that run on THREE different kinds of fuel. That is all grand. But what if my roof collapses? Can I survive that? Oh yes I can and I am ready to go in a moments notice. Many people who have lived in Florida more than 10 years or so have escape plans.

SO then what if the roads are impassable? Can I abandon my car and survive that too? Yes I can.

And finally, what if the waves come in and sweep me out to sea? Can I still survive? Yes I can. Those of us who have been in the Navy know how to instantly fashion a life vest out of an ordinary pair of pants.

So what is in your bugout bag? What is in your comfort bag? What plan have you made to abandon the comforts you have in order to survive?
No. 558     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 8:52 PM     
Power:

There has been a lot of discussion on solar power. solar panels and batteries.

Solar panels: Each type of cell has different advantages and disadvantages. These characteristics should be evaluated in light of the role it plays for the prepper.

Some folks on this thread have seemed to prioritize PRICE over function. I read in one post where Bullfighter had all but destroyed his WalMart boots.

WHAT???!!!

What in clothing, besides underwear and sport shirts, can you buy at WalMart that is worth buying? Certainly not TACTICAL BOOTS! Even under VERY hard use boots should late at least 7 to 10 years. I have known many boots to last far longer than that. A boot that lasts a year is nothing but junk. More on boots in another post, but I am using the boots to illustrate a point about SOLAR POWER.

Now before we begin, we have to establish that solar power past the boundaries of the homestead is a COMPLETE luxury. In fact any solar panel that is bigger than about 18 inches square will likely be discarded if you end up without your vehicle.

In a survival situation, what matters is SIZE, WEIGHT, EFFICIENCY, and DURABILITY. In ALL of these, the monocrystalline is by far superior to the other technologies. Of course it is also the most expensive. They are far more efficient per square meter of panel and last MUCH longer.

Remember, if society collapses, you will not be able to just run down to Mr, Solar for another panel if the one you have is not doing the job you need. Many solar technologies have a life expectancy of just 7-8 years whereas most monocrystalline panels come with 25 year WARRANTIES - meaning their life expectancy is far greater.

Per square meter, polycrystalline put out about 60% to 75% of the power of monocrytalline panels. Film panels are cheap but are only about half as efficient as pollycrystalline and a third as efficient as monocrystaline. That is just dandy if you have a LOT of yard space unhindered by shade but the life expectancy is fairly short on them as well.

Batteries:

First, like solar panels, during a societal collapse, you will not just be able to hop in your car and visit Mr. Battery for some more Energizers.

There has been much discussion about things such as SHELF LIFE. Hey we all know that Lithium Ion batteries loose 15% of their charge in the first few days. But the fact is you can recharge them.

Someone posted about extending the life of disposable batteries by putting them in the fridge and then using them as a medium of exchange when the prepper crap hits the fan. Well, first that assumes you HAVE a fridge to put them in. Second that assumes that when the expiration date on the battery says 2020 and it is already 2019 that someone will think they are worth ANYTHING even if they are in the condition they were in 2012. How would you prove it?

As for your own stuff, those rechargeables are still rechargeable and you can do that even when the thugs have come and killed Mr. Battery over his last disposable.

However, depending of how long Armageddon lasts for you folks, what will you do when even your rechargables are worn out? Do you know how to make your own batteries? You can, you know.

Sure they won’t last as long as commercial batteries nor be as convenient, but you can still light a lamp [especially an LED!] and you might even have enough juice to do something else. You can make batteries out of pineapples or any kind of citrus.... In fact anything that provides a source of acid and then a supply of dissimilar metals like iron and copper. Put them in the acid and instant electrical potential.

Need a capacitor? Offset two sheets of aluminum foil and put a piece of newspaper or rice paper between them. The THINNER the paper, the better. Roll it up and shazam, a capacitor is born.

If you want to survive, you need to be a bit of a MacGyver. What you make at the last moment might not be as nice as what you bought at the show, but it might just save your life.
No. 559     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 8:56 PM     
Alcohol

I have seen a lot of posts on THINGS TO BUY. But as pointed out in earlier posts, one the scum of the earth have taken over, Mr. Solar, Mr. Battery, Mr. Grocery and Mr. Fuel will probably all be dead.

So what can you MAKE for yourself. I briefly covered making your own batteries and capacitors, but there are many other things you can make too. It is pretty easy to make commodities like soap for example. Yet most of the prepper sites I have been to talk as much about killing everyone else and feeding yourself as they do about making life livable.

I am not talking about luxuries. A direct correlation exists between cleanliness and health and life expectancy. Maybe I will post about how to make soap out of animal or plant fats soon, but in my book alcohol is more important.

Why?

First, it has about a million uses:

As a first aid antiseptic
As a solvent
As a preservative
As a cleaning agent - even for your firearms when Mr. Gunsmith and Mr. Chemical turns up missing.
As a FUEL !!!
= You can cook with it
= You can make lamps with it
= With minor modifications you can run your car on it!!

And you guys want to talk about a bartering medium? Alcohol will be as good as gold, maybe better.

There are lots of ways to make simple stills. Some even just use solar energy. The moonshine coming from these quick stills will NOT taste very good. I takes a couple of weeks to make decent moonshine, but for chemical/medical purposes you are all good.

You can make a quart of alcohol on the run in less than a day if you don’t need it top quality. If you want something better it takes a few days. If you want enough to run a vehicle, you will need a fixed location too as a portable still can only produce a quart or two per day..

Another bonus is that when you run out of all those fancy water filters you bought before the collapse you still have a means of getting truly pure drinking water. The same still that makes alcohol for you will also make PURE DISTILLED DRINKING WATER even faster than it makes alcohol.

Instead of putting starch or sugar and water in the still, you just take some nasty old water, run it through an old T-shirt to get rid of the particulates, dump it in the still and run the heat up about an extra 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

However, on solar it can take a while because the available direct heat on a solar still is a lot further from the distillation temperature of water than alcohol. It will still work on a solar still, it just takes a while. If you need it fast you can heat your solar still by conventional means though.
No. 560     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 20, 2016 at 10:18 PM     
Is Military Gear Really the Best for Survival?

Every piece of gear is a compromise. For the military factors mitigate the survival aspects of their gear including the net lethal effect of the individual and cost.

How much military gear has specialized attachments that are NOT useful outside the military? A BUNCH! For example, you don’t need grenade pockets on you magazine holders and pouches. That is just something that adds weight, takes space and can snag you in the brush. How many times would a metal D-ring been better than the plastic ones they provide OR vice versa. The stuff they have is optimized for THEIR mission, which might be quite different than your mission.

For example, I am not a big fan of tactical jackets. They have WAY too many pockets which I would NEVER fill because the weight AND bulk of filling them would slow me down. I prefer motorcycle jackets. They are more durable and more flexible and have more pockets than I need.

A motorcycle jacket is usually designed to be used in AT LEAST three seasons. The water proof characteristics of good bike gear puts tactical jackets to shame. Frequently, even the pockets are waterproof. And how about wind resistance? I have ridden my motorcycle in 25 degree weather and remained comfortable. Will your tactical jacket keep you warm at 20 degrees in a 70 MPH wind? Can you wear the same jacket when it is 80 degrees and driving rain?

Military jackets tend to ride a bit high for my taste. It is cool if you are toting a handgun and need fast access, but I prefer the concealment my motorcycle jacket provides, not to mention the additional comfort.

How about body protection? There is some protection in SOME tactical jackets, but generally the designer was more concerned with how many magazines or grenades you can carry. Most motorcycle jackets have body armor and you can fall out of a car at 45 MPH and just get up and walk away.

But jackets are not the only place I am not the biggest fan of military gear. I prefer hiking boots over tactical boots. I prefer civilian outdoor knives over military ones as well. I have found military knives can be thick in the wrong places and have weight that do not help at all outside of a combat situation.

Of course there is a problem with not buying military gear. You won’t be the coolest cat at the prepper show. You might get an odd look wearing a leather motorcycle jacket on a hiking trail... right till you walk past the hikers humming and smiling while they are trying to find a way to get dry.

How about backpacks? Again, I find civilian packs more convenient and useful. I never use all those MOLLE loops. In fact I prefer the old ALICE system because they require less maintenance and they are more durable. I may put a few things on my pack, but I will hang them. Not as cool as those preppers for sure, but on the trail with the gear I need to survive, I will make them look totally unprepared.

Now there are a few things I really like from the military. Belts, ALICE clips, mess kits and the wonderful wonderful SEABAG!

That seabag will keep a whole ton of stuff dry. Now some of you like all kinds of pockets and compartments. NOT ME! Just keep my gear dry! A seabag is so useful I could live my whole life out of one.

Now how do I organize a seabag? Well compartments are not needed. Just go get various colors of river bags and fill it up! Winter clothes in the white bag. Summer clothes in the green bag. First aid in the red bag. Tools, cooking gear and utensils in the blue bag. Weapons and ammo in the black bag.

Take the whole mess, throw it in the river and use it as a raft until you get down river. Everything will be bone dry.

Need something quick? Just look for the color, open the bag and it is all there.

BTW..... NO BOOKS!

You want a bugout bag? In my book the seabag is the only way to go. I have traditional backpacks. The only thing I use them for is to carry what I need with me TODAY and to make sure NOTHING except my wallet, phone, handkerchief and ONE PEN are in my pocket. [I don’t even like keys in my pocket. They hang off a belt loop even when I wear a suit and tie]. If my backpack weighs 10 pounds, it weighs too much.

My view is that if I don’t reach for it every 30 minutes it does not belong in my pocket. If I don’t reach for it every day, it does not belong in my backpack. [Though I will keep spare pens and my checkbook there, though I rarely use either].

I only carry books if they are required for a class. I usually won’t even carry a Bible since there is one in my phone already. Books are for home, at a desk or in bed. I don’t carry books.

I do carry some of the things I carry on my tac belt when I am hiking in my backpack. But ALL of those things combined weigh a few ounces at most. From the perspective of hiking, camping, or prepping, I have little use for a backpack.

I know I will get lots of grief for that position.

Your mileage may vary.
No. 561     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Oct 30, 2016 at 2:24 AM     
CAsandie wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Here's where I got mine. Check these out, 5 pages worth.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?cat=0&dir=asc&order=price&q=flashlight


Good prices! Not sure if this are tactical flashlights though. The tac can shine 2 nautical miles and the strobe can blind a predator. The one you have has an awesome LED charge though (100,000 hours)!

Did you say you sell any on your website?





If you are talking about that Bell & Howell Taclight toted on TV, I can get that shipped free for $14.99 each. It is of a lower quality tactical light though when it comes to serious duty tactical flashlights. You can pay $200 for those that rank as the best. But for a very bright torch, the B&H is probably worth the cost to have around.

In fact, you can get that B&H Taclight on Amazon shipped free for $14.99 at the moment. Even on eBay it regularly only $14.99 shipped free direct from the manufacturer.
No. 562     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Oct 30, 2016 at 2:28 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:
In fact, you can get that B&H Taclight on Amazon shipped free for $14.99 at the moment. Even on eBay it regularly only $14.99 shipped free direct from the manufacturer.


In fact, I got one for totally free on eBay direct from the manufacturer using eBay Bucks.
No. 563     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Oct 30, 2016 at 2:40 AM     
Mission_Specialist wrote:

Darrell wrote:

Jimmy98 wrote:

When I was a kid I worked at the locasl "Piggly Wiggly" grocery. One day an old lady who lived across the street came in a driving rain to do her weekly shopping. Whe was in he 80s and we always carried her things home for her since she only lived across the parkig lot. She gave me a one dollar tip. Of the four quarters she gave me, the most recently minted was 1905, U gave tehm back to her and explained that they aere quite valuable. She handed them back and told me to save them for as long as she had and one day they'd be worth even more. I still have them.



I too still have more than one piece of currency handed to me when I just a kid. Amongst one being an 1856 Flying Eagle Cent and another being an 1853 Liberty Head "V" Nickel. I have a lot of old coins and some old currencies. American and foreign.


OPPS!

Liberty head nickles were not produced until 1883 and no nickels were produced in 1853. In 1853 the five cent coin was a HALF DIME which was a silver coin that was half the weight of a dime.

The first nickle was the shield nickle and it was first released in 1866.


Apparently a typo. I do have a Liberty Head "V" Nickel regardless of year.
No. 564     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Oct 30, 2016 at 3:52 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Mission_Specialist wrote:

Darrell wrote:

Jimmy98 wrote:

When I was a kid I worked at the locasl "Piggly Wiggly" grocery. One day an old lady who lived across the street came in a driving rain to do her weekly shopping. Whe was in he 80s and we always carried her things home for her since she only lived across the parkig lot. She gave me a one dollar tip. Of the four quarters she gave me, the most recently minted was 1905, U gave tehm back to her and explained that they aere quite valuable. She handed them back and told me to save them for as long as she had and one day they'd be worth even more. I still have them.



I too still have more than one piece of currency handed to me when I just a kid. Amongst one being an 1856 Flying Eagle Cent and another being an 1853 Liberty Head "V" Nickel. I have a lot of old coins and some old currencies. American and foreign.


OPPS!

Liberty head nickles were not produced until 1883 and no nickels were produced in 1853. In 1853 the five cent coin was a HALF DIME which was a silver coin that was half the weight of a dime.

The first nickle was the shield nickle and it was first released in 1866.


Apparently a typo. I do have a Liberty Head "V" Nickel regardless of year.


I have no doubt you have a V nickle. I just figured that people should not be out there looking for an 1853 if it did not exist. No big deal.

I have an interesting story about V nickles and I will try to post a thread about it in the next day or two.
No. 565     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Nov 10, 2016 at 9:39 AM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Well I finally did it. I went and ordered me an H-45 Military Heater-Stove.

I have been wanting to get one for years and have never seemed to get around to it.

I figured I had better get one while they are still available before the supply of them dries up! They are no longer made for the US Government.

This for those who know anything about it is the "crown jewel" of Survival Stoves! They are ugly, but do the job and well.

I got mine off of Amazon for $129 + a whopping $52 shipping. Supposedly mine has "everything", all parts included minus the Jerry can and stand of course.



It burns Diesel, Home Heating Oil, Kerosene, JP5 through JP8 Aviation Jet Fuels, even Gasoline. (Don't think i'd want to try the gasoline though). It will burn Wood too.

It has an adjustment dial for the different fuel types. It requires absolutely no electric power whatsoever.

It produces anywhere from 15,000 to 45,000 BTU's of heat depending on the temperature setting dial.

It uses an older style 5 gallon Jerry can to hold the fuel and the can then sits on a metal tripod stand. It has an adapter though that will work with the newer Plastic jerry cans.

I'll have to pick the jerry can up separately later.

It was originally designed for heating the Large Military Tents of the GP series.

It would work for an emergency situation, in a Cabin, Garage, Pole barn, etc. as well. It NEEDS some fireproof base underneath it though as it gets very hot. (Was originally designed to just sit on the bare dirt ground.)

A few layers of Firebrick should work.

Here is one article on it: https://www.gunsamerica.com/blog/prepping-101-sub-urban-survival-heater-stove-burns-oilgasoline-45k-btu/


Just ordered 2 - 4" back Stove Pipe elbows and a 5" x 4" Reducer/Increaser for it so I can hook it up to an existing flue that goes through the roof.

That would be all I need to start burning wood. You can even burn coal in it.

This company had the exact sizes I need, kinda hard to find although i'm sure they are available elsewhere.

They have every single type of Stovepipe piece you can think of!

http://www.woodmanspartsplus.com/

Anxious to try this beast out since I have a bunch of branches and limbs to get rid of.

Still have yet to buy a 5 gallon Jerry can and stand for the can though.

Once I get that I can try burning some Diesel in it too and see how that does.
No. 566     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Nov 11, 2016 at 3:28 AM     
After re-reading my above posts about the Military Heater it seems only the older style Military Surplus Jerry cans will work with it.

The newer NATO ones that have the flange mount for the spout won't work.

It has to have the older one with the 2.5" round threads.

There are however some newer Military Surplus plastic jerry cans that have the threads made by Spencer.

But they are very pricey.

I found some older Military Surplus Jerry Cans for only $29.95 so those will should do. They sell better grades for a higher price but some dents and rust on the outside shouldn't matter. They are enameled on the inside.

Many places sell them for considerably higher cost.

The same company also sells the metal tripod stand for the jerry can which was made for this heater. It is $14.95.

It really isn't necessary though since you can just rest a jerry can on a sturdy table. They would be handy when camping though when used with a real Military or Hunting Tent.

I think i'll order 2 metal jerry cans next payday.
No. 567     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Nov 12, 2016 at 9:57 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Here's where I got mine. Check these out, 5 pages worth.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?cat=0&dir=asc&order=price&q=flashlight


Good prices! Not sure if this are tactical flashlights though. The tac can shine 2 nautical miles and the strobe can blind a predator. The one you have has an awesome LED charge though (100,000 hours)!

Did you say you sell any on your website?





I have located that same Bell&Howell Tac Light for as little as $10.99 with a different brand name on it. And for $16.00 in a deluxe package of the same thing.

All 3 are the exact same flashlights simply with different brand names on them. You could likely contact the manufacturer and have them run a batch with whatever name you wanted printed on them.

I finally opened my Tac Light. These are not real tactical flashlights. They are just "cheap" little flashlights being called a tactical flashlight.

I somewhat take back what I said about the Tac Light maybe being worth having around. It is a bright little flashlight for immediate vicinity use. But my old Maglight is a multiple times better flashlight for the money. Reaches out there much further and is not even LED. Next time I will run down to Walgreens and buy a new Maglight if I just need a good solid well made bright torch.

At $10, the Tac Light is likely a handy light to have in the drawer of the average homeowner. But for someone that requires a serious tactical flashlight for everyday duty service, I doubt the "on and off" switch on the Tac Light would last 30 days.
No. 568     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Nov 13, 2016 at 5:09 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Here's where I got mine. Check these out, 5 pages worth.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?cat=0&dir=asc&order=price&q=flashlight


Good prices! Not sure if this are tactical flashlights though. The tac can shine 2 nautical miles and the strobe can blind a predator. The one you have has an awesome LED charge though (100,000 hours)!

Did you say you sell any on your website?





I have located that same Bell&Howell Tac Light for as little as $10.99 with a different brand name on it. And for $16.00 in a deluxe package of the same thing.

All 3 are the exact same flashlights simply with different brand names on them. You could likely contact the manufacturer and have them run a batch with whatever name you wanted printed on them.

I finally opened my Tac Light. These are not real tactical flashlights. They are just "cheap" little flashlights being called a tactical flashlight.

I somewhat take back what I said about the Tac Light maybe being worth having around. It is a bright little flashlight for immediate vicinity use. But my old Maglight is a multiple times better flashlight for the money. Reaches out there much further and is not even LED. Next time I will run down to Walgreens and buy a new Maglight if I just need a good solid well made bright torch.

At $10, the Tac Light is likely a handy light to have in the drawer of the average homeowner. But for someone that requires a serious tactical flashlight for everyday duty service, I doubt the "on and off" switch on the Tac Light would last 30 days.


The switches are usually the first to fail in my experience.

Maglights while a good flashlight simply don't cut the mustard for every night security use.

I went through a number of the 3 & 5 cell "D" sized Maglights and the switches only lasted a few months before failing.

I am talking about using one 5-7 nights per week every 1-2 hours depending on the site worked so they were subjected to some pretty heavy duty use.

I then gave up on the Maglights and advanced to a professional grade Streamlight that cost me about $120.

It was worth every penny too.

I have only had to rechargeable battery stick 1 time and the bulb assembly once in almost 20 years.

But I have not been using it much the last several years. The RR accounts is where I needed one the most.

So far the switch has never failed.
No. 569     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Nov 23, 2016 at 5:29 AM     
Ordered just one 5 gallon Jerry can for the Military Stove for now. Might order more in the future. They were $29.95 for the older style Military Surplus one with the round threaded hole.
NOT EPA compliant! :-)


One surplus sleeping pad for backpacking excursions. They are only $5.

And one jumbo size 40mm Ammo can. It is 6" wide x 10" Tall x 18" long. Only $12.95. Waterproof of course! Assuming I get one with a good rubber seal. Should hold a lot of ammo!


No. 570     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Nov 23, 2016 at 11:13 AM     
I have several ammo cans. I do not have any metal "jerry" cans.
No. 571     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Nov 23, 2016 at 11:23 AM     
Last Friday while I was working at The Home Depot a storm came through and knocked out the power. A transformer out front caught fire and burned. To my surprise, the store had back-up generators that provide enough power to allow keeping the store open and operational at a minimum level.

The power is still out. The local utility provider estimates it will be at least a week before they can obtain the required transformer from somewhere on the other side of the USA. Therefore THD had a huge diesel generator brought in to bring the store electric to being fully operational in preparation for the Black Friday sales period.

Anyway, I was impressed that they had any kind of back-up power allowing them to remain open for such incidents. I have never worked any place that had other than emergency back-up lighting in place, and that was simply powered by self-contained batteries. Even the huge automotive factories I have been in had no more than back-up lighting and UPS on some of the computers and processors. But generators of a size to keep such a factory operating would have been cost prohibitive.
No. 572     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Nov 23, 2016 at 1:36 PM     
A week is a long time for a big business to go without power.

I have worked many sites that had backup diesel generators in addition to UPS battery backups.

The Hydroelectric Power Plant, a few of the Banks, the Electron Tube Manufacturer, the Railroads.

I see them all the time behind larger office buildings.

The electric power plant I worked at even brought out a huge generator just to run the electric in our guard shack for a few weeks.

We kinda laughed due to it being overkill because it was so large for our needs.
No. 573     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Nov 23, 2016 at 1:42 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

I have several ammo cans. I do not have any metal "jerry" cans.


I have a number of .30 & .50 cal ammo cans but it seems like they fill up to fast. So this 40mm should do for awhile.

I needed this specific style Jerry can to work with the adapter the Military Stove comes with in order to burn liquid fuels with it.
No. 574     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Nov 23, 2016 at 10:12 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

I then gave up on the Maglights and advanced to a professional grade Streamlight that cost me about $120.

It was worth every penny too.



In the things that don't make sense department:

You will pay $120 for a flashlight and declare it is worth every cent, but you will buy $40 boots from WalMart and then complain they don't last a year.

Okey dokey.
No. 575     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Nov 24, 2016 at 1:31 AM     
Mission_Specialist wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I then gave up on the Maglights and advanced to a professional grade Streamlight that cost me about $120.

It was worth every penny too.



In the things that don't make sense department:

You will pay $120 for a flashlight and declare it is worth every cent, but you will buy $40 boots from WalMart and then complain they don't last a year.

Okey dokey.


You misread my post #522.

At no time in that post did I, "complain" about the cheap $40 Boots like you are alleging in your above post.

I merely pointed out a fact.

I am well aware there is no comparison between a $40 pair of Tactical Boots from Walmart and a $300 pair of Danner Boots.

They filled an immediate need for about a year, and I was actually surprised they lasted that long.

Eventually I will invest in a higher grade Boot when I have the surplus funds available to do so.

Right now I have other priorities and they can simply wait.

If these elcheapos which are currently doing fine hold up for a year that will be good enough.


No. 576     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Nov 24, 2016 at 1:41 AM     
Mission_Specialist wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

I then gave up on the Maglights and advanced to a professional grade Streamlight that cost me about $120.

It was worth every penny too.



In the things that don't make sense department:

You will pay $120 for a flashlight and declare it is worth every cent, but you will buy $40 boots from WalMart and then complain they don't last a year.

Okey dokey.


And on another note, at the time I bought the $120 Streamlight the Maglights were wearing out after just a few months of HD use.

AND at the time I had a surplus of funds as well. Back then I paid $0 in rent for Housing. (I was an Apartment Building Manager on the side and got free rent).

I was able to sock away $thousands into CD's and raw land.

Things are different these days. I rarely get overtime with this company, unlike before when I was doing sixty-five hours per week minimum.

But lately I have had OT, about 8 hours per week. Will be working a full 7 days this week.
No. 577     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Nov 30, 2016 at 12:31 PM     
Well they just arrived! The Jerry can is in VERY good condition! As is the 40mm ammo can. The ammo can is YUGE! It has clamps on both ends and the rubber seal looks almost like new. I will be ordering a few more of these 40mm cans. Why waste money on smaller .30 and .50 cal cans when these are the same price at only $12.50? Looks like they are built to withstand WW3! I'm hooked on them! These big ones would be good for storing the larger 12 gauge shotgun shells in bulk.

They shipped the ammo can and the Jerry can together inside a plain box.

The foam rubber sleeping pad is just wrapped in black shipping plastic and taped. Haven't unraveled that yet.

Tomorrow we hook up the Military Stove and test it out!

Today we catch up on some much needed rest to try and beat this cold. I worked all last week without a day off so it will be nice to take a breather.
No. 578     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Dec 1, 2016 at 8:20 PM     
Well I got the Military Stove in place to test it out.

I set it on 2 concrete blocks for now until I can get some firebrick.

I had to chop a hole in the wall, removed a 1.5' x 1.5' section of wall to run the flue pipe through.

And as Murphy's law would have it, I need an adapter to hook it to the existing flue that goes through the ceiling.

There is a stainless steel insert in the existing flue that adjusts up and down about a foot that I could remove then i'd be good to go.

But that is also an extra layer of safety I would be removing and I really don't want to do that.

I might be able to remove it from the roof side, tried doing it from inside and no go.

Also unwrapped all the stove pieces and half assembled what I could.

The plastic Knob for the type of "fuel adjustment type" appears to be missing. I thought it was on there when I looked at it a year ago but my memory might be wrong on that.

Perhaps i'll find it on the ground or floor of the shed somewhere down the road.

No biggy since I do have the instruction manual with a photo and once I set it to, "Diesel" there it will stay until or unless I need to use some other type of fuel in an emergency.

Would be nice to have the knob though. I could probably make one out of wood and mark it.

One thing I was not aware of is that this can also be used with 55 gallon drums per the instructions! A definite +.

I did realize it but the fuel can hole and the adapter that hooks up to it are the same exact hole as 55 or 30 gallon drums.

Tomorrow i'll take a look at the roof and see about temporarily removing that stainless steel insert so I can try it out.

I need to measure and order the top cap for my existing fluepipe on the roof since there isn't one up there.

It did come with a 4" fluepipe top with ropes that hold it down on a Military or Hunter's tent but I can't use that size for the pipe already on my roof.

So that will get stored for maybe future use with a tent.
No. 579     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Dec 3, 2016 at 9:26 PM     
Finally, purchased a new pair of tactical boots. Opted for those Sportman's Guide waterproof side zips. The boots I purchased near end of last winter from Gander Mountain are great boots as far as providing comfort on a long day of being on your feet, but I have recently learned not really all that waterproof.

Also ordered a variety of socks. Like 30 pairs of military issue and tactical. I do not like to do laundry any more than I have too. And several pairs of my current socks are beginning to exhibit holes in the heels since I went back to work.

Ordered two more of those military surgical kits also. Others recently purchased the last two from me.
No. 580     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Dec 8, 2016 at 8:51 PM     
Well the 3 day assault Backpack I have been wearing 5-7 days per week has split at the seams a few times. Both straps had failed at different times where they tie onto the bottom.

I repaired those with the Awl for Awl tool. The repairs are holding up quite well.

The original factory seam on the side of the backpack I notice is now failing and coming apart. I can see the contents inside. The Ballistic Nylon at the seam is frayed and wearing out.

It will likely need a patch of new material in order to repair it.

Anyway this Backpack has held up for a year of full time heavy duty use and as far as i'm concerned has served me well for only what ? $59.95 I think I paid for it.

So now I have order a new bag I have had my eye on for well over a year for only $44.99.

The, "Cactus Jack Discreet Tactical Bag": http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/cactus-jack-discreet-tactical-bag

This cool bag can be used as a backpack, it has padded shoulder straps as well as a waist belt. While the waist belt is not padded it should ride lower and more towards my hips than my current backpack does.

And I am thinking I should be able to get an aftermarket padded hip belt to slide onto it.

This pack is not as noticeable as a standard backpack since it is only 8" deep and rides close to your back.

The bag can also be used as a horizontal shoulder strap bag. The shoulder straps hide away when not in use.

Shoulder strap
Top haul handle
Dual side handles
Padded shoulder straps can be covered when not needed
3 external pockets
16" x 9" internal padded sleeve
Compression straps secure load
Rain cover
42.6-liter (2,600-cu. in.) capacity
25" x 8" x 13"h.,
3 lbs.

Heck you could probably fit a 28" Rifle in the thing diagonally! :icon_eek:
No. 581     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Dec 9, 2016 at 12:52 AM     
Also ordered a new pair of Tactical Pants. These are called, "Tactical Training Trousers", whatever that means.

They are only $19.99, another $5 for the hemming though.

I wanted them for the rear Flashlight pockets. Unfortunately the photos do not show what those rear pockets look like but for this price i'll take a chance on them.

If I like them, i'll order more. Fortunately they had my exact size in stock.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/tactical-training-trousers-40250.html

65% polyester & 35% Rip-Stop cotton 7¼-7½oz Rip-Stop Canvas
Slide Adjustment waistband for added comfort
Unique 9 pocket design
2 extra deep front slash pockets
2 back pockets with rectangular flaps and Velcro® closures
2 inverted pleat cargo pockets with Velcro® closure
2 rear flashlight/sap pockets
Flashlight/Mag/Cell phone pocket with Velcro® closure
Interior knee-pad pockets (knee-pads not included)
Machine washable
zippered and clip on closure

Also ordered a 2.25" wide Nylon Duty belt which was on sale for only $8.99.

A Nylon Key Keeper.

4 Nylon belt keepers

And one other item for the duty belt.

I already have a full array of Black Leather Basketweave duty belt and accessories I wore years ago on various sites.

But it is heavy, and in my miniwarehouse right now anyway.

The newer Nylon styles are what most LEO's are gravitating towards these days when wearing Tactical Pants. They are lighter, cheaper too.
No. 582     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Dec 9, 2016 at 11:43 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Finally, purchased a new pair of tactical boots. Opted for those Sportman's Guide waterproof side zips. The boots I purchased near end of last winter from Gander Mountain are great boots as far as providing comfort on a long day of being on your feet, but I have recently learned not really all that waterproof.

Also ordered a variety of socks. Like 30 pairs of military issue and tactical. I do not like to do laundry any more than I have too. And several pairs of my current socks are beginning to exhibit holes in the heels since I went back to work.

Ordered two more of those military surgical kits also. Others recently purchased the last two from me.



Well the order came. The socks seem nice and well made.

Not so impressed with the boots. They are likely getting shipped back, and I will just go pay double that price for the brand I desired in the first place.

The boots are quite uncomfortable and more effort to get on and off than a pair of simple lace up boots. At least with my old boots I only fight with laces, versus now fighting with laces and a side zipper.
No. 583     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Dec 9, 2016 at 6:26 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Finally, purchased a new pair of tactical boots. Opted for those Sportman's Guide waterproof side zips. The boots I purchased near end of last winter from Gander Mountain are great boots as far as providing comfort on a long day of being on your feet, but I have recently learned not really all that waterproof.

Also ordered a variety of socks. Like 30 pairs of military issue and tactical. I do not like to do laundry any more than I have too. And several pairs of my current socks are beginning to exhibit holes in the heels since I went back to work.

Ordered two more of those military surgical kits also. Others recently purchased the last two from me.



Well the order came. The socks seem nice and well made.

Not so impressed with the boots. They are likely getting shipped back, and I will just go pay double that price for the brand I desired in the first place.

The boots are quite uncomfortable and more effort to get on and off than a pair of simple lace up boots. At least with my old boots I only fight with laces, versus now fighting with laces and a side zipper.


Well the boots are gone. Returned them. Did not take long to realize they would simply not do for the aggressive tactical activities I engage in. They look good, but are not functional enough for me. Are also very uncomfortable and difficult to get on and off.

After trying on a pair of each of the socks, I almost returned all of them also. But when I calculate the per pair price, I opted to keep them. But the socks I purchase locally at Gander Mountain or the local military surplus are much better and fit more comfortable.

It was aggravating to pay $7.50 for the return label. Returns to SG are not free, but I have purchased so much from them at low cost and they have dropped many orders for me to my own Buyers, I figured they had well more than paid me back for the first thing I have ever returned to them.

Back to Gander Mountain or 5.11 for the boots I really desire.
No. 584     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Dec 9, 2016 at 6:35 PM     
Hmmm... I just realized SG only shipped me one of the surgical kits. But they also only charged me for one per the invoice.
No. 585     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 102   on  Dec 10, 2016 at 8:05 PM     
Did some boot shopping this evening. I was trying on $100 boots before anything was even close to being acceptable. At $160+ boots before finding anything of really high quality and functional enough to meet my desires. And the first of those was a brand I had never even heard of before, Keen. Doing a little more research online, they appear to be a very respected brand.
No. 586     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Dec 12, 2016 at 11:43 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Also ordered a new pair of Tactical Pants. These are called, "Tactical Training Trousers", whatever that means.

They are only $19.99, another $5 for the hemming though.

I wanted them for the rear Flashlight pockets. Unfortunately the photos do not show what those rear pockets look like but for this price i'll take a chance on them.

If I like them, i'll order more. Fortunately they had my exact size in stock.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/tactical-training-trousers-40250.html

65% polyester & 35% Rip-Stop cotton 7¼-7½oz Rip-Stop Canvas
Slide Adjustment waistband for added comfort
Unique 9 pocket design
2 extra deep front slash pockets
2 back pockets with rectangular flaps and Velcro® closures
2 inverted pleat cargo pockets with Velcro® closure
2 rear flashlight/sap pockets
Flashlight/Mag/Cell phone pocket with Velcro® closure
Interior knee-pad pockets (knee-pads not included)
Machine washable
zippered and clip on closure

Also ordered a 2.25" wide Nylon Duty belt which was on sale for only $8.99.

A Nylon Key Keeper.

4 Nylon belt keepers

And one other item for the duty belt.

I already have a full array of Black Leather Basketweave duty belt and accessories I wore years ago on various sites.

But it is heavy, and in my miniwarehouse right now anyway.

The newer Nylon styles are what most LEO's are gravitating towards these days when wearing Tactical Pants. They are lighter, cheaper too.


Well this order arrived today.

So far just looking at the Tactical Pants I like them. The rear Flashlight/Baton pocket is a stealth type pocket on the right rear. just one of them.

Plus your 2 standard rear pockets with flaps of course.

The Knife pocket is nice and big, and fits my large folding Knife perfectly. it has a flap too. just one of those pockets.

Then there are the side cargo pockets and the front ones, cellphone pockets too.

No lower leg pockets.

Not as many pockets as the Condor brand I have been wearing but that's ok.

A definite + is 5 Belt Loops instead of the 4 the Condor brand has.

I think i'll switch into these new ones later on in the shift.
No. 587     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Dec 12, 2016 at 11:52 PM     
I actually put the new Nylon duty belt on while on the Bus, lol.

It is VERY stiff and thick and could definitely hold a heavyweight .45 for example.

I had to adjust it once (with effort) to fit my waist but shouldn't have to anymore. The plastic snap buckle looks pretty rugged.

Not bad for only $8.99 on sale!

The 4 Belt keepers have 2 black metal snaps each.

The Key Holder is thick as well and I am currently using that right now. It keeps keys, "silent" and prevents them from rattling. Has a little loop with snap, a metal ring, and the material which then folds around the keys to keep them quiet.

It has velcro to hold the flaps closed.

The pepper spray holster is very stiff and thick too. A 2" flip top cannister does not fit in it though due to the plastic ridge around the dege of the can.

A "Bullet" type cannister might though.

I also coincidentally ordered a new batch of Pepper spray of various sizes and types which also arrived today.

i think I did order a Bullet type 2oz in that batch too so will see when I get home if it fits.

I don't carry pepper spray for this site but for when coming and going to-from home, etc.
No. 588     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Dec 13, 2016 at 4:10 AM     
Well I tried these new Tactical Pants on. They fit perfectly and seem more comfortable than the Condor ones.

They seem a little thinner and lighter weight than the Condor ones too. Might breathe a little easier in hot weather.
No. 589     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Dec 27, 2016 at 12:04 PM     
So now I have order a new bag I have had my eye on for well over a year for only $44.99.

The, "Cactus Jack Discreet Tactical Bag": http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/cactus-jack-discreet-tactical-bag

This cool bag can be used as a backpack, it has padded shoulder straps as well as a waist belt. While the waist belt is not padded it should ride lower and more towards my hips than my current backpack does.

And I am thinking I should be able to get an aftermarket padded hip belt to slide onto it.

This pack is not as noticeable as a standard backpack since it is only 8" deep and rides close to your back.

The bag can also be used as a horizontal shoulder strap bag. The shoulder straps hide away when not in use.

Shoulder strap
Top haul handle
Dual side handles
Padded shoulder straps can be covered when not needed
3 external pockets
16" x 9" internal padded sleeve
Compression straps secure load
Rain cover
42.6-liter (2,600-cu. in.) capacity
25" x 8" x 13"h.,
3 lbs.

Heck you could probably fit a 28" Rifle in the thing diagonally! :icon_eek:


Well so far 2 zippers have broken. Not the zipper itself but the pull tab that mounts to it broke off, cheap pot metal. Fortunately each seam has 2 zippers so I still have one on each seam I can use.

I did order a repair zipper and will see what I can do with that.

And yesterday when just 2 blocks from home coming home the lower right shoulder strap failed where it was sewed onto the backpack.

I did have 2 Netbooks in there plus other stuff so was a bit overloaded with weight.

Same exact failure as on my other 3 day assault pack.

So I will empty most everything out of it and carry it to work using the shoulder carry strap that also came with it!

Then will sew the strap back on using heavy duty cordage using the "Awl For All" sewing tool. I had to do the same thing on the other pack.

I think the hip belt threads have popped too but will hold off on that since I ordered 2" wide nylon belt material I may replace the 1.5" belt entirely that came with it.

I may "add" some more ballistic nylon reinforcement material to the corners where the straps mount to so may just hold off until that material I ordered comes in in a few more days. That way I can be sure it will NEVER come off again!

Once the strap is sewn on with that Awl For All tool it should never come off! That is some really heavy duty cord and the repairs I made months ago on the 3 day assault pack are holding up like the day I sewed them.

Overall though, I really like this new backpack a lot better than the old one as it carries much more as far as volume and items are much easier to gain access to.

It alos has PALS loops on the top left, very top, and top back for attaching extra pouches. So far I have just one attached to the left side.

I do plan to add more for various reasons as I go along.
No. 590     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 5, 2017 at 7:04 PM     
Went to Menard's today to, "save big money!" as their slogan goes.

Ended up spending just over $100, lol.

Anyway picked up a big and bad USB, "Power Bank". It's much bigger than the last ones I had which were 2200 to 2600mah capacity.

This one is 10,000mah. has 2 USB ports, a built in LED Flashlight with a strobe mode.

IP65 tested.

This baby is Weatherproof, splashproof, mudproof, and has a rubber outer frame making it shock resistant too. Has a carabiner clip for carrying it on something. Has a rubber cover for the USB ports to keep the rain out.

4 blue micro flashing leds to show the charging status level.

A picture of a guy carrying a backpack standing on a stone cliff, looks like it should serve me well as a camping/backpacking battery bank.

It was only $15.

They had the smaller 2600mah ones for $5 but I thought I would step up to a bigger and better one.

Everyone should have a usb battery backup for their cellphone if hiking or backpacking or even car traveling in back country.it just may help save your life!

I can't tell you how many survival stories I have read where the person's cellphone battery was dying or did while trying to get help.

Cellphones may not even work in some backcountry areas.

But the GPS features most of them have nowdays just might help get you out if lost for example.

The Manufacturer's website only shows a 5x 7800mah model but mine is a bigger 10,000mah model in black rubber so it looks something like this:

http://www.xtremecables.net/Duracharge.aspx

No. 591     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 5, 2017 at 7:18 PM     
Menard's has an extensive and surprisingly good line of quality Winter clothing.

They must have had over 150 different types of mittens and gloves.

I picked up a good pair of Ragg Wool fingerless Glove/Mittens. It is open for your fingertips for dexterity but you can cover them up with the thick mitten flap.

They are also lined with 40grams of Thinsulite.

They were $10.00

I should even be able to slide a pair of the wool Military surplus shooter's gloves I have into them during extreme subzero conditions.
No. 592     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Jan 6, 2017 at 9:57 AM     
Over the Holidays I ordered more "survival type items".

I am contemplating storing nutrition meal replacement shakes and other such products as some of my emergency food supply. Their shelf life is not as great, one to two years, as products specifically designed for emergencies. But I already rely on them for an occasional mobile meal now and then, and use them regularly for protein intake when working out. So my cache of such would be constantly being replenished with newer product. They are also price competitive with products specifically designed for nutritious emergency meals.
No. 593     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Jan 6, 2017 at 10:07 AM     
I have quite a variety of USB battery backups around. At least 6-10 at the moment, from pocket size ones to large home based ones. As well as portable solar panels for charging them. A couple of the portable ones have solar panels built in. I have a couple all in ones. They provide USB ports, can jump a car, have a built in compressor, and provide at least 40 minutes of direct 110V power for minimal use before requiring charging.

I sell them regularly as well as the solar panels, and offer a variety of custom solar generator packages. Think I sold 3 last week.

My personal use ones are always changing. I sell what I am using as a "demo", and move on to the latest and greatest for my own use.
No. 594     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 63   on  Jan 6, 2017 at 11:34 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Over the Holidays I ordered more "survival type items".

I am contemplating storing nutrition meal replacement shakes and other such products as some of my emergency food supply. Their shelf life is not as great, one to two years, as products specifically designed for emergencies. But I already rely on them for an occasional mobile meal now and then, and use them regularly for protein intake when working out. So my cache of such would be constantly being replenished with newer product. They are also price competitive with products specifically designed for nutritious emergency meals.


You might also want to take a look into how fast the products degrade after their shelf-life listed expirations. If they slowly degrade, as opposed to a fast degradation, they may be more of a positive acquisition.
No. 595     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 1:00 AM     
This thread has gotten a little weird. It was about survival gear. Now it is about a bunch a boys comparing their toys and seeing who has the most. I think if we actually come to a survival situation this won't prepare anyone for it.

Good luck gentleman.
No. 596     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 4:24 PM     
Mission_Specialist wrote:

This thread has gotten a little weird. It was about survival gear. Now it is about a bunch a boys comparing their toys and seeing who has the most. I think if we actually come to a survival situation this won't prepare anyone for it.

Good luck gentleman.


Actually, the title of the thread is "Survival/Disaster Gear". For one whom is resourceful enough, that may likely be putting any item or knowledge to appropriate use to endure a need.
No. 597     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 6:11 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Mission_Specialist wrote:

This thread has gotten a little weird. It was about survival gear. Now it is about a bunch a boys comparing their toys and seeing who has the most. I think if we actually come to a survival situation this won't prepare anyone for it.

Good luck gentleman.


Actually, the title of the thread is "Survival/Disaster Gear". For one whom is resourceful enough, that may likely be putting any item or knowledge to appropriate use to endure a need.


Well it seems to me that what deals we get, especially the ones that are not available to the reader, how much we buy, how we sell, how an item fits us personally, preferences in color, and a myriad of other information that is not helpful to the reader in selecting appropriate gear for a situation is more about who owns the sandbox. I just find 10 consecutive posts about how one prefers the fit of one jacket or the color of another a bit irrelevant to the topic.

Now we are discussing HOW MANY USB chargers we have. Do we need more than one or two or even three? How are we going to use them when there is no power? How about those delicate solar panels? [I am now working in solar BTW]. Are we REALLY going to roll up a three foot mat of them and take them on a hike so we can use our Kindle?

Oh no, I get we can charge a device with a small solar charger and that might be handy, but the context of this conversation over the last few pages has little to do with survival or even just dealing with a power outage during a storm and more about just being gear junkies.

My dad has like 300 knives and somehow he can't resist buying just one more. This thread has kind of gotten like that. I mean anyone who has 10 USB chargers, five jackets, dozens of knives, 20 or 50 or more flashlights is just playing a testosterone game. How about 20 guns or more? I mean don't we really just need a pistol and a shotgun? Maybe a carbine if we are really wanting to be a bad boy?

I buy very carefully and very little. I have TWO jackets, a great pair of boots, two knives, three flashlights a nice handgun and a tac belt and that is already WAY more than I ever carry with me. A garage full of gear is a hobby, not an exercise in survival. If you guys want to do that, that is all well and good, I just don't really see this thread about survival or emergency management anymore.

Some people always have the latest cell phone and some the latest gun and others yet have to have every tool in the catalog. You guys collect outdoor gear. Nothing wrong with that at all unless you are REALLY looking to figure out a way to deal with some kind of emergency. This thread is no longer about that and to pretend that it is is a bit weird to me.

My brother owns a shop and has maybe $70,000 worth of hand tools packed into a pair of roll away tool cabinets that are literally bigger than some small cars. The Snap-On man never comes by without selling him something. The other car guys come around and talk about all the cool tools they have and if one has a new one that is especially cool they will all have one within a week.

They laugh at me because my roll away is only five feet long. But really, I can do about 99% of what they can do and I have maybe $5,000 in tools including my air compressor and impact tools.

I think this thread has become a bit like those mechanics. You don't NEED 10 USB chargers or to always have the latest outdoor gizmo. I promise you that I can survive better than most with what I just carry on my belt. And when you factor in my SKILLS - which all fit inside my head - I will probably be more comfortable than a guy with a pickup truck full of "survival gear" and I will definitely live longer.

And also, while we are on the topic, "defense classes" are all good stuff too. But in a survival situation knowing hand to hand combat techniques is NOT the best way to survive. Reconnaissance, recognition, stealth and evasion offer a much better chance of getting you to see the next day.

And, by the way, that camo jacket is the least important part of stealth. You would be surprised just how close you can get to your enemy wearing a bright yellow shirt in many cases. Not that it is advisable to wear bright yellow, but I can sneak up on most people wearing just about anything.

So I am just saying you guys are having a good time buying all of this redundant gear. I have a simple set of gear. You guys have a closet full of jackets. I can get by just fine with one. You guys have a bunch of tents. I have a two man tent just for convenience and I don't even need that. I know how to build a very cozy, dry, warm [or cool as the need dictates] very hard to see shelter with what I can find laying about anywhere in urban environments or out in the woods and I can build it in just a few hours with the tools I carry on that trusty tac belt.

I think survival food is great, but I know how to hunt, fish and forage also with what I have on that same tac belt. My comfort comes from a few packs of seasoning that I carry on - guess what? - that same belt. I can survive very comfortably with a no flashlight at all [and I have done so more than once] but I do carry ONE small decent flashlight for convenience. In fact, in a real survival situation, that flashlight can get you killed very fast.

Bullfighter likes flashlights because he is a cop and he like to read books. Soldiers don't usually use flashlights and they don't carry ANY books.

Real survival is NOT about what you carry, it is about what you leave behind.

Once I got mad at Delta airlines because they took some fingernail clippers from me. I wrote them and detailed all the LETHAL weapons I could make in less than two minutes from just what is laying about on the airplane. They wrote me back and said they wish I would talk to the TSA about it because they were tired of taking fingernail clippers from people. I am guessing one of you probably has a pair of camo colored fingernail clippers laying about.

Much of what is discussed here is about living off the grid. That is fine, but that is just step one. If I were going to go to the mountains for a while, I would bu a 45 foot Winnebago and set up a satellite dish. In hard times, Stormchaser's teardrop trailer is a better bet. I just think this thread is just more about Winnebagos than tear drop trailers.

That is fine, but it is weird because you each seem to have TEN OR MORE of everything. I bet if things get tough, you will lose most of them your first week - maybe less.

Finally, you guys seem to know how to use all of this gear, but I have seen very little evidence you know when to use it.

-----

Your ship is sinking. Do you grab that piece of floating mast in the water or grab that pair of jeans slowly sinking in the water below you? Most people would grab the mast but that is actually the wrong answer. Most people will most likely drown.
No. 598     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 7:48 PM     
Mission_Specialist wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Mission_Specialist wrote:

This thread has gotten a little weird. It was about survival gear. Now it is about a bunch a boys comparing their toys and seeing who has the most. I think if we actually come to a survival situation this won't prepare anyone for it.

Good luck gentleman.


Actually, the title of the thread is "Survival/Disaster Gear". For one whom is resourceful enough, that may likely be putting any item or knowledge to appropriate use to endure a need.


Well...


I am not sure why or what aspect of personal experience being shared matters so much to another.

Everyone is not in the same place or of the same mindset and knowledge level at the same time. At this stage, per the OP, it appears to me it is not really about who knows the most or has the greater skills to survive with less than what another may. What one prefers, another may not. It is about awareness, education, and personal preference.

Yes, sooner or later, if one is serious about such preparation, they will have to concentrate on acquiring must have basic core knowledge, skills and/or gear, etc.. You cannot always have all your preferred gear with you, especially if there is a need to become mobile. And that can propose endless scenarios as to your preference of gear for a bugout bag and/or do you require a cache of hidden preferential supplies, etc.. But you have to draw the line somewhere.

I think any discussion on the topic, at least raises awareness. Whether one decides to do anything towards preparedness or not, is another matter. Each and everyone has their own comfort level. And if they decide to move forward, then must do their own due diligence for themselves and loved ones. If you find something that works for you, why not share that knowledge?

It can become tedious to read essentially of the same thing shared over and over, but it is of benefit to know what is available and how another has faired with it. Knowledge of how well gear has functioned in typical daily use, may provide some insight on whether it may be relied upon for more serious use if your life or that of another is possibly on the line.

As far as items and gear, most everything I purchase for me personally, is of some use in current activities and/or training. Thus eventually wearing out and requiring a backup and/or replacement. Some items are not faring as well as I may have hoped to or found to be of no real use whatsoever. While I can rest assured that other items/gear have not failed me time and time again. It is a dynamic issue. Despite the core must have skills, I am constantly reviewing what gear or technique best suits me as options. That may mean owning and using a variety of gear, handguns, rifles, etc., over a period of time. I then use to end of its life, dispose of or liquidate what no longer suits me or requires replacing.

I know not everyone is ambitious as I or others to avail themselves of some kind of training or day to day practice or exercise in the various aspects of "survival" or "self-defense". For me personally, it is an obligation to be best prepared as reasonable to protect loved ones and friends. Whether that means a cache of gear that can be shared, or growth in personal mental, physical and/or spiritual knowledge and skills. Yes, I sometimes struggle to grasp why others may not see it as I do, but I have to learn to love them where they are at. And not to say my way is the right way, it is simply what I see right for me at the time.
No. 599     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 63   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 7:53 PM     
Mission_Specialist wrote:

In hard times, Stormchaser's teardrop trailer is a better bet.


As kind of a sidebar comment, I bought my teardrop with the NASCAR detailing as I liked NASCAR and thought it was cool, even though I was hardly a NASCAR fanatic, but I did watch the races on TV. I haven't done that for years now.

When I got interested in prepping and survivalism, I chided myself for not buying a camo-detailed teardrop.

But now I'm glad I got the NASCAR, even though I don't follow NASCAR any more. Then why? Because in today's present-day American police-state culture, CAMO is 'evil.' You don't see as much as camo clothing as you used to. And as for my NASCAR teardrop, yes, it does garner attention, but because it is NASCAR, not CAMO. Cops will notice the NASCAR detailing and likely think it is as cool as the average guy will. But with a CAMO teardrop, cops will nowadays be thinking of hidden guns and the like and may act much more aggressively with a search & seizure mentality.

The teardrop has some other advantages - off the ground camping, light weight so can be pulled by almost any vehicle (even a motorcycle with the stripped-down version), fuel efficient to pull, easy to boondock in (got stuck in the mud in a once-in-30yr. rainstorm in Wyoming in the middle of nowhere. Just turned off the car and crawled into the teardrop for the night...an adventure), easy to park, easy to maneuver (can be pushed by hand on pavement or 'smooth' land/gravel), and most of all...just plain fun.

Here is my 'new' car, which will be pulling my teardrop after I install a hitch onto it...



The car is sleek and streamlined, providing good gas mileage. The teardrop shouldn't be much above the air-streaming path hardly at all and I anticipate little fuel increase.
No. 600     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 8:14 PM     
Mission Impossible wrote: I just find 10 consecutive posts about how one prefers the fit of one jacket or the color of another a bit irrelevant to the topic.


That is because you don't understand the purpose behind a thing.

The, "size" of one's jacket can be very important to survival.

For example I intentionally ordered this foul weather jacket I am now wearing tonight due to the pouring rains off and on.

I debated whether to wear my Blizzard Parka or the foul weather jacket.

It was lightly raining out before I left for work.

By the time I got to Taco Bell and waited for that fist Bus while eating it was pouring out.

I had made the decision before leaving to wear a somewhat lightweight Winter Jacket underneath the Foul Weather jacket which was a perfect decision.

I intentionally ordered a size larger just for this purpose, so I could fit a lightweight Winter coat underneath.

The temperature is dropping so the foul weather jacket by itself would not have been enough to keep me warm.

But combining the was just right.

As far as the color of one's clothing that can be an extremely important factor when one desires to blend in with the surrounding terrain in order to "keep low" which might be very important in a survival situation.

Ask former WWII survivors who had to fend for themselves and, "lay low" in the urban terrain to avoid detection by the Nazis.

Or in a wilderness environment blending in while Hunting or to avoid detection by other enemy humans.
No. 601     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 8:21 PM     
Mission Impossible wrote:

I buy very carefully and very little. I have TWO jackets,


You live in Florida.

Don't even THINK about trying to talk to us about "jackets" to those of us who live up here in the frozen north, and the changing weather who have learned from long hard experience it is best to have an array of jackets, coats, and Parkas to choose from depending on the weather.

We speak from lifelong experience here concerning, "cold weather".

You don't.
No. 602     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 8:33 PM     
Mission_Specialist wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Mission_Specialist wrote:

This thread has gotten a little weird. It was about survival gear. Now it is about a bunch a boys comparing their toys and seeing who has the most. I think if we actually come to a survival situation this won't prepare anyone for it.

Good luck gentleman.


Actually, the title of the thread is "Survival/Disaster Gear". For one whom is resourceful enough, that may likely be putting any item or knowledge to appropriate use to endure a need.


Well it seems to me that what deals we get, especially the ones that are not available to the reader, how much we buy, how we sell, how an item fits us personally, preferences in color, and a myriad of other information that is not helpful to the reader in selecting appropriate gear for a situation is more about who owns the sandbox. I just find 10 consecutive posts about how one prefers the fit of one jacket or the color of another a bit irrelevant to the topic.

Now we are discussing HOW MANY USB chargers we have. Do we need more than one or two or even three? How are we going to use them when there is no power? How about those delicate solar panels? [I am now working in solar BTW]. Are we REALLY going to roll up a three foot mat of them and take them on a hike so we can use our Kindle?

Oh no, I get we can charge a device with a small solar charger and that might be handy, but the context of this conversation over the last few pages has little to do with survival or even just dealing with a power outage during a storm and more about just being gear junkies.

My dad has like 300 knives and somehow he can't resist buying just one more. This thread has kind of gotten like that. I mean anyone who has 10 USB chargers, five jackets, dozens of knives, 20 or 50 or more flashlights is just playing a testosterone game. How about 20 guns or more? I mean don't we really just need a pistol and a shotgun? Maybe a carbine if we are really wanting to be a bad boy?

I buy very carefully and very little. I have TWO jackets, a great pair of boots, two knives, three flashlights a nice handgun and a tac belt and that is already WAY more than I ever carry with me. A garage full of gear is a hobby, not an exercise in survival. If you guys want to do that, that is all well and good, I just don't really see this thread about survival or emergency management anymore.

Some people always have the latest cell phone and some the latest gun and others yet have to have every tool in the catalog. You guys collect outdoor gear. Nothing wrong with that at all unless you are REALLY looking to figure out a way to deal with some kind of emergency. This thread is no longer about that and to pretend that it is is a bit weird to me.

My brother owns a shop and has maybe $70,000 worth of hand tools packed into a pair of roll away tool cabinets that are literally bigger than some small cars. The Snap-On man never comes by without selling him something. The other car guys come around and talk about all the cool tools they have and if one has a new one that is especially cool they will all have one within a week.

They laugh at me because my roll away is only five feet long. But really, I can do about 99% of what they can do and I have maybe $5,000 in tools including my air compressor and impact tools.

I think this thread has become a bit like those mechanics. You don't NEED 10 USB chargers or to always have the latest outdoor gizmo. I promise you that I can survive better than most with what I just carry on my belt. And when you factor in my SKILLS - which all fit inside my head - I will probably be more comfortable than a guy with a pickup truck full of "survival gear" and I will definitely live longer.

And also, while we are on the topic, "defense classes" are all good stuff too. But in a survival situation knowing hand to hand combat techniques is NOT the best way to survive. Reconnaissance, recognition, stealth and evasion offer a much better chance of getting you to see the next day.

And, by the way, that camo jacket is the least important part of stealth. You would be surprised just how close you can get to your enemy wearing a bright yellow shirt in many cases. Not that it is advisable to wear bright yellow, but I can sneak up on most people wearing just about anything.

So I am just saying you guys are having a good time buying all of this redundant gear. I have a simple set of gear. You guys have a closet full of jackets. I can get by just fine with one. You guys have a bunch of tents. I have a two man tent just for convenience and I don't even need that. I know how to build a very cozy, dry, warm [or cool as the need dictates] very hard to see shelter with what I can find laying about anywhere in urban environments or out in the woods and I can build it in just a few hours with the tools I carry on that trusty tac belt.

I think survival food is great, but I know how to hunt, fish and forage also with what I have on that same tac belt. My comfort comes from a few packs of seasoning that I carry on - guess what? - that same belt. I can survive very comfortably with a no flashlight at all [and I have done so more than once] but I do carry ONE small decent flashlight for convenience. In fact, in a real survival situation, that flashlight can get you killed very fast.

Bullfighter likes flashlights because he is a cop and he like to read books. Soldiers don't usually use flashlights and they don't carry ANY books.

Real survival is NOT about what you carry, it is about what you leave behind.

Once I got mad at Delta airlines because they took some fingernail clippers from me. I wrote them and detailed all the LETHAL weapons I could make in less than two minutes from just what is laying about on the airplane. They wrote me back and said they wish I would talk to the TSA about it because they were tired of taking fingernail clippers from people. I am guessing one of you probably has a pair of camo colored fingernail clippers laying about.

Much of what is discussed here is about living off the grid. That is fine, but that is just step one. If I were going to go to the mountains for a while, I would bu a 45 foot Winnebago and set up a satellite dish. In hard times, Stormchaser's teardrop trailer is a better bet. I just think this thread is just more about Winnebagos than tear drop trailers.

That is fine, but it is weird because you each seem to have TEN OR MORE of everything. I bet if things get tough, you will lose most of them your first week - maybe less.

Finally, you guys seem to know how to use all of this gear, but I have seen very little evidence you know when to use it.

-----

Your ship is sinking. Do you grab that piece of floating mast in the water or grab that pair of jeans slowly sinking in the water below you? Most people would grab the mast but that is actually the wrong answer. Most people will most likely drown.


Your entire post above is filled with all kinds of misconceptions, and fallacies.

I think you may still be stuck in the safety and comfort of that Naval Ship you were on, lol.
No. 603     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 8:58 PM     
Mission Impossible wrote:

Bullfighter likes flashlights because he is a cop and he like to read books. Soldiers don't usually use flashlights and they don't carry ANY books


First off I am not a Cop.

Secondly depending on the site worked over the last 25 years flashlights were and are an important part of our work and even required by some sites.

Some sites at times called for doing stealth and or undercover work where we did not use flashlights, but carried them.

And not all situations call for carrying a big long Streamlight...

I carry 2 different ones coming and going to work at work and actively use both of them.

The smaller tactical one I use when crossing a bridge over a creek which has no pedestrian walkway on it. There are no streetlights in the area either. This means I must share the roadway which has a fair amount of traffic with cars, drunks driving them, etc.

I place it in my left hand shining down, and somewhat backwards and in strobe mode.

This lets cars approaching behind me know well in advance I am walking on the road.

It keeps me from getting hit or killed and works very well.

Yes, I could wear something reflective like some do, especially the Bicyclists around here.

But for various reasons I choose and prefer to wear all black or dark navy blue so as to blend in with the urban surroundings near work at night.

There is a certain amount of crime around there.

The larger 3 cell tactical flashlight I use when making patrols outside at work.

Mostly to BE seen by potential criminals in the area AND so I can see the Skunks as I am outside with plenty of room in advance before I come up on them.

The smaller flashlight, while good, simply isn't bright enough for the job.

The reason and goal of using flashlights on various sites while working has nothing to do with your above post.

Some sites we actually used a hi powered rechargeable LED spotlight while doing patrols.

That was to easily spot truck thieves legs under or behind the trailers.

Most sites we use bright flashlights in order to be able to easily spot and see trespassers, potential criminals.

The flashlight is used to temporarily blind them also. There is a reason Cops "flash" a light in your eyes even if for just a second. It ruins your night vision temporarily.

The other reason we use flashlights on many sites is a proactive one. So criminals or potential ones can see a uniformed officer is actively patrolling an area.

Another reason is because they can be used as self-defensive weapons or to gain compliance.

When a Peace Officer first approaches and engages someone does he first draw his baton and hold it in his hand while talking to his subject"?

No, we draw our flashlights.

There are reasons for that!

Even the small one I carry can remove chunks of flesh if needed.

Trust me, Cops and Security Personnel do NOT carry flashlights because they see them as, "toys" like you do.

They are in fact, "tools of the trade".
No. 604     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 9:19 PM     
Mission Impossible wrote:

Bullfighter likes flashlights because ... he like to read books. Soldiers don't usually use flashlights and they don't carry ANY books.


Do you have something against education?

There are some survival books out there which are very small, compact, and lightweight.

While backpacking I have carried a small pocket sized Bible, you know, the one that is the size of a pack of cigarettes and fits in your top shirt pocket.

Books on survival, and actually practicing and trying them out, are what you read and do BEFORE you get into a potential survival situation not during or after!

Somewhat baffled that you are against survival education.

I guess staying in ignorance on how to survive is better?

Oh wait I see we are supposed to rely on YOUR survival skills, lol.

But again certain small books might be totable, especially like in the trunk of your car for example. That certainly wouldn't hurt anything.

And I hate to burst your bubble there but you are wrong.

Both Union and Confederate Soldiers during the Civil War CARRIED, "Prayer Books" about 4.5" tall.

Here they are: http://justus.anglican.org/resources/bcp/1789Selections/
No. 605     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 9:30 PM     
What Mission Impossible fails to realize is that a surplus of flashlights can be used for bartering, trading, or even handed out and given away during survival situations.

Flashlights and batteries will definitely be in high demand.

Like long term power failures, even short ones lasting a few days.

Having numerous USB chargers to also barter, or give away to those who may need them can make them worth their weight in gold.

He is thinking only in terms of, "himself" and what HE would need or do, and forgets that there are others out there in the world who would want a flashlight, some batteries, or the ability to use their cellphone.

Even if cell towers are down a cellphone can hold an enormous amount of survival info, music, videos, etc.

Even music, just like comfort foods is and are important during long term survival situations.

Flashlights, batteries, toilet paper, usb chargers, are all like, "money in the bank" during a survival situation.

And if not for yourself, to trade or give away to others in need.
No. 606     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 10:07 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Mission Impossible wrote:

I buy very carefully and very little. I have TWO jackets,


You live in Florida.

Don't even THINK about trying to talk to us about "jackets" to those of us who live up here in the frozen north, and the changing weather who have learned from long hard experience it is best to have an array of jackets, coats, and Parkas to choose from depending on the weather.

We speak from lifelong experience here concerning, "cold weather".

You don't.


What does living in Florida have to do with it. Florida is not a prison colony and we do travel.

I grew up in the snow. I worked until recently traveling in 46 states plus Canada all year long every year. Frequently the temps, without considering wind chill were substantially below zero. When I was in the Navy, I had duty in frigid locations including a winter on the Great Lakes. (Cold AND windy AND wet). I have ridden my motorcycle in temperatures down to the low 20's. At 70 MPH the wind chill is substantially below zero.

The Navy issued me just TWO coats. They were used from below zero temps to barely cool. I still have some of my Navy gear, though I am not certain where it all is.

However, my favorite jackets that I still wear are both motorcycle jackets. I like them because they are VERY adaptable. They are rain proof at 70 MPH. Since they are designed to be used on a bike they are designed for freedom of movement in mind and have very big strong pockets. They are designed to protect riders in the event of a crash, so they are very very strong. Since they are not just designed to keep you warm, but to protect you as well, they are designed with ventilation which allows them to even be worn in warmer weather. Some people even wear them in the summer, but I don't like to do that unless I am on the highway to force a lot of air through the vents which open with water proof zippers.

They have add in liners for really cold weather so find I can stay fairly warm at 70 MPH in temps down to the 20's and can wear them without a problem at temps above 60 degrees. I can wear them in the sun, the rain or the snow.

One is leather and the other is ballistic nylon. The only draw back is that when stuffed with warm weather liners and the crash protection/body armor, they can be a little heavy compared to regular jackets, but not terribly so. Still they take a little getting used to compared to a regular jacket or coat.

I wear my black leather jacket from 20 degrees up to near 90 degrees. My ballistic nylon jacket is grey and cut a bit longer than the leather one. It shows dirt a bit easier than the black leather and because of the length I usually don't wear it in temps above 70. However, even though I can wear the leather one in the rain, the extra length of the grey one makes it easier to wear in the rain.

The biggest problem with motorcycle jackets is that you can't buy a real decent motorcycle jacket for $50 at Wal-Mart or even $100 at a surplus store. Good ones start in the $250 to $300 range and many are closer to $400 or even more.

So I have two jackets. I don't even know where my Navy coat is anymore. I have lived in places where the snow rises above the doors, so I guess this Florida boy has a little perspective on the cold and the snow.


I have some cold weather gloves too.. and cold weather socks ... and insulated underwear... and ... . Sorry if even THINKING about that offends you.

No. 607     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 10:13 PM     
Stormchaser wrote:

Mission_Specialist wrote:

In hard times, Stormchaser's teardrop trailer is a better bet.


As kind of a sidebar comment, I bought my teardrop with the NASCAR detailing as I liked NASCAR and thought it was cool, even though I was hardly a NASCAR fanatic, but I did watch the races on TV. I haven't done that for years now.

When I got interested in prepping and survivalism, I chided myself for not buying a camo-detailed teardrop.

But now I'm glad I got the NASCAR, even though I don't follow NASCAR any more. Then why? Because in today's present-day American police-state culture, CAMO is 'evil.' You don't see as much as camo clothing as you used to. And as for my NASCAR teardrop, yes, it does garner attention, but because it is NASCAR, not CAMO. Cops will notice the NASCAR detailing and likely think it is as cool as the average guy will. But with a CAMO teardrop, cops will nowadays be thinking of hidden guns and the like and may act much more aggressively with a search & seizure mentality.

The teardrop has some other advantages - off the ground camping, light weight so can be pulled by almost any vehicle (even a motorcycle with the stripped-down version), fuel efficient to pull, easy to boondock in (got stuck in the mud in a once-in-30yr. rainstorm in Wyoming in the middle of nowhere. Just turned off the car and crawled into the teardrop for the night...an adventure), easy to park, easy to maneuver (can be pushed by hand on pavement or 'smooth' land/gravel), and most of all...just plain fun.

Here is my 'new' car, which will be pulling my teardrop after I install a hitch onto it...



The car is sleek and streamlined, providing good gas mileage. The teardrop shouldn't be much above the air-streaming path hardly at all and I anticipate little fuel increase.


What kind of car is that, Storm -- it's nice it has room for hauling (I was wondering what the teardrop man got).


No. 608     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 10:27 PM     
not goin tp pick on anyone tonight but
i'm not going to stock up on knives or guns
and i'm certainly not going to overstock said items
that can be taken from me and used against me...

plus investing in small items is a waste of time outside
of what you use and can upkeep on yer own...less is more

investing in higher ticket items for resale is smarter.
Profit & time is wasted dealing with hammerheads and
wannabe jarheads on small items that could get you killed.
No. 609     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 10:37 PM     
Mission Capable .... I'd just like to say that I would choose the pants as a flotation device.

MissionSpecialist wrote: I have some cold weather gloves too.. and cold weather socks


Hats...do you have cold weather hats (I just bought my Mom a fur lined trapper hat to her head warm ).



Also I'd like to confess that while I do not own 20 guns...I am a shoe hoarder (never mind off topic and just trying to make someone smile).



...


Also men, I think there needs to be a survival/disaster gear part two thread due to the number of pages (admin says it messes up the format on MC), does someone mind making a second thread? (just asking). Thanks for considering.
No. 610     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 10:48 PM     
crayons wrote: not goin tp pick on anyone tonight


Whew! Thank you -- I've had a rough day.. (wiping the sweat from my brow)...

(and I'd likely agree that one collects guns as a hobby, but with survival one would like want to carry light ... that's why my shoe collecting would never work in a combat situation...[if that is what is being discussed...otherwise if we are preparing for a financial collapse, I have some good bartering items)!

Just saying -- :-p

(mod because I had the typo of battering rather than bartering ... considering I'm talking shoes, that is awful funny guys ... heels can make a pretty good weapon in a survival situation).
No. 611     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 11:05 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

crayons wrote: not goin tp pick on anyone tonight


Whew! Thank you -- I've had a rough day.. (wiping the sweat from my brow)...

(and I'd likely agree that one collects guns as a hobby, but with survival one would like want to carry light ... that's why my shoe collecting would never work in a combat situation...[if that is what is being discussed...otherwise if we are preparing for a financial collapse, I have some good battering items)!

Just saying -- :-p

as far as hoglegs and smokepoles go, if you cant holster or
scabbard what you already have yer wasting yer time...i can bury PM's
but self defense objects and accouterments require more responsibility.

food will be a big asset in trying times and less worry/blowback. at least in the rural areas...rural area crime/theft rising. you dont want to have
anything laying around the idiots can steal and use against you.
No. 612     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 11:15 PM     
crayons wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

crayons wrote: not goin tp pick on anyone tonight


Whew! Thank you -- I've had a rough day.. (wiping the sweat from my brow)...

(and I'd likely agree that one collects guns as a hobby, but with survival one would like want to carry light ... that's why my shoe collecting would never work in a combat situation...[if that is what is being discussed...otherwise if we are preparing for a financial collapse, I have some good battering items)!

Just saying -- :-p

as far as hoglegs and smokepoles go, if you cant holster or
scabbard what you already have yer wasting yer time...i can bury PM's
but self defense objects and accouterments require more responsibility.

food will be a big asset in trying times and less worry/blowback. at least in the rural areas...rural area crime/theft rising. you dont want to have
anything laying around the idiots can steal and use against you.


Oh come on Crayons ...

You can't see me getting at least one hog leg for a pair of red pumps or silver stilettos?

(I just noticed my typo above of battering instead of bartering [oh now that has to make someone smile if not not laugh around here]}!!!

No. 613     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 11:18 PM     
Mission_Specialist wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Mission Impossible wrote:

I buy very carefully and very little. I have TWO jackets,


You live in Florida.

Don't even THINK about trying to talk to us about "jackets" to those of us who live up here in the frozen north, and the changing weather who have learned from long hard experience it is best to have an array of jackets, coats, and Parkas to choose from depending on the weather.

We speak from lifelong experience here concerning, "cold weather".

You don't.


What does living in Florida have to do with it. Florida is not a prison colony and we do travel.

I grew up in the snow. I worked until recently traveling in 46 states plus Canada all year long every year. Frequently the temps, without considering wind chill were substantially below zero. When I was in the Navy, I had duty in frigid locations including a winter on the Great Lakes. (Cold AND windy AND wet). I have ridden my motorcycle in temperatures down to the low 20's. At 70 MPH the wind chill is substantially below zero.

The Navy issued me just TWO coats. They were used from below zero temps to barely cool. I still have some of my Navy gear, though I am not certain where it all is.

However, my favorite jackets that I still wear are both motorcycle jackets. I like them because they are VERY adaptable. They are rain proof at 70 MPH. Since they are designed to be used on a bike they are designed for freedom of movement in mind and have very big strong pockets. They are designed to protect riders in the event of a crash, so they are very very strong. Since they are not just designed to keep you warm, but to protect you as well, they are designed with ventilation which allows them to even be worn in warmer weather. Some people even wear them in the summer, but I don't like to do that unless I am on the highway to force a lot of air through the vents which open with water proof zippers.

They have add in liners for really cold weather so find I can stay fairly warm at 70 MPH in temps down to the 20's and can wear them without a problem at temps above 60 degrees. I can wear them in the sun, the rain or the snow.

One is leather and the other is ballistic nylon. The only draw back is that when stuffed with warm weather liners and the crash protection/body armor, they can be a little heavy compared to regular jackets, but not terribly so. Still they take a little getting used to compared to a regular jacket or coat.

I wear my black leather jacket from 20 degrees up to near 90 degrees. My ballistic nylon jacket is grey and cut a bit longer than the leather one. It shows dirt a bit easier than the black leather and because of the length I usually don't wear it in temps above 70. However, even though I can wear the leather one in the rain, the extra length of the grey one makes it easier to wear in the rain.

The biggest problem with motorcycle jackets is that you can't buy a real decent motorcycle jacket for $50 at Wal-Mart or even $100 at a surplus store. Good ones start in the $250 to $300 range and many are closer to $400 or even more.

So I have two jackets. I don't even know where my Navy coat is anymore. I have lived in places where the snow rises above the doors, so I guess this Florida boy has a little perspective on the cold and the snow.


I have some cold weather gloves too.. and cold weather socks ... and insulated underwear... and ... . Sorry if even THINKING about that offends you.



I have endured 54 Winters here in Chicago and know what Mother Nature is capable of serving up here.

Have you?

I happen to LIKE an array and assortment of Coats, Jackets, and or Parkas to choose from.

God is not poor.

A Navy Peacoat while good and I have worn them years ago especially if Wool are nice coats they are not good for Blizzard conditions here.

A Parka with a "Snorkel" type hood which rolls out and extends away from your face is more suitable for that here.

The fur ruff around the edge catches snow and does enable you to see much better during whiteout conditions during Blizzards.

There is a reason Eskimos have been making and using them for years.

And for windy conditions especially during subzero temps.

A Navy Peacoat does nothing for protecting your face.
No. 614     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 11:28 PM     
The term, "Survival" can mean completely different things to different people.

To one person survival might mean during large scale riots in a big city bugging out in a huge Winnebago type Bus out in the woods somewhere.

To another it might mean making and living in a lean to made out of branches.

The "quality" of the survival situation and "comfort" level one chooses to attain to varies greatly from one person to the next.

For example, living on life support in a Coma for 8 years may be, "surviving" but what is the quality of life in that survival situation?

One person may be quite content to survive off of roasted bugs but another person may prefer canned food to survive off of.


No. 615     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 60   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 11:30 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

crayons wrote:

CAsandie wrote:

crayons wrote: not goin tp pick on anyone tonight


Whew! Thank you -- I've had a rough day.. (wiping the sweat from my brow)...

(and I'd likely agree that one collects guns as a hobby, but with survival one would like want to carry light ... that's why my shoe collecting would never work in a combat situation...[if that is what is being discussed...otherwise if we are preparing for a financial collapse, I have some good battering items)!

Just saying -- :-p

as far as hoglegs and smokepoles go, if you cant holster or
scabbard what you already have yer wasting yer time...i can bury PM's
but self defense objects and accouterments require more responsibility.

food will be a big asset in trying times and less worry/blowback. at least in the rural areas...rural area crime/theft rising. you dont want to have
anything laying around the idiots can steal and use against you.


Oh come on Crayons ...

You can't see me getting at least one hog leg for a pair of red pumps or silver stilettos?

(I just noticed my typo above of battering instead of bartering [oh now that has to make someone smile if not not laugh around here]}!!!

oh' CA/ yer style brings a smile, my comedic skills shine/are more prevalent on fight club threads...kind of boring here lately...but
am having fun on another site beating up real PRC/red chineese operatives
as well as home grown hollyweird pedoperve commies from yer neck of the woods.

that shyyt keeps me up to speed/awake.
No. 616     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 11:30 PM     
Okay Crayons ... I will test my bartering capability here:

BF -- i will trade you one parka for one pair of pair of black pumps.

Mission -- I will trade you one pair of J41 (they are adventure shoes and actually made by Jeep...but way cute and comfy) for one leather jacket.

Deals?



(k. I think I need sleep :-p)....

No. 617     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 11:47 PM     
And Crayons --

Get those hollyweird pedoperve commies straight (and I'd appreciate it if you could arrange a deport out of these woods, please)! :-p

Now ... I'm going to go see what I can barter for a hog leg.






No. 618     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 11, 2017 at 11:50 PM     
crayons wrote:

investing in higher ticket items for resale is smarter.
Profit & time is wasted dealing with hammerheads and
wannabe jarheads on small items that could get you killed.


Such as?

Bullets?
No. 619     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 12:35 AM     
CAsandie wrote:

crayons wrote: not goin tp pick on anyone tonight


Whew! Thank you -- I've had a rough day.. (wiping the sweat from my brow)...

(and I'd likely agree that one collects guns as a hobby, but with survival one would like want to carry light ... that's why my shoe collecting would never work in a combat situation...[if that is what is being discussed...otherwise if we are preparing for a financial collapse, I have some good bartering items)!

Just saying -- :-p

(mod because I had the typo of battering rather than bartering ... considering I'm talking shoes, that is awful funny guys ... heels can make a pretty good weapon in a survival situation).


As far as firearms for a survival situation it all kind of depends on what you are preparing to survive, "for".

A Shotgun can get you food, such as Deer, Pheasant, Quail, Geese, Ducks, etc. Good for home self defense too.

A cheap .22 rimfire rifle can get you any kind of Bird, as well as having cheap ammo which can last you a really long time.

A handgun can be good for self-defense, depending on the situation.

Some of them with longer barrels or interchangeable barrels, short and long can be good for Hunting as well.

Then there's the "evil" AR15 thing which can be used for all kinds of things, Hunting, Self-Defense, or more.

One does not need a lot of firearms. Just a few good ones, the ability to use them with skill, and a supply of ammo.

A black Powder rifle can be a good survival item too. One can cast their own bullets, make their own powder, all from readily available items.
No. 620     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 12:40 AM     
I don't know if anyone touched on it yet but a Crossbow or compound bow can be a great survival item.

One can Hunt Deer with them, quietly and without attracting any attention too like a shotgun or rifle would.

Even other small game.

If one does not want to give away their location to others this would be the way to go.

They could be used as weapons as well, quiet but deadly. They are sometimes used in War.

And they can be had fairly inexpensively.

Arrows can even be made from scratch.
No. 621     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 1:16 AM     
I have a number of Polish Special Forces Leopard Camo Military Surplus Parkas, all new, unused.

I have them in an array of sizes (I resell them).

So far I have yet to wear one in Winter. I have tried some on though. They are very thick and bulky. Would likely be super warm they are so thick but the arms have so much insulation in them it might restrict your movements somewhat.

They would likely be good for sitting or standing for long periods outside.
No. 622     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 1:43 AM     
Soldiers today carry Ipads into Battle, seriously.

Here is what a British Soldier carries into Battle with him today:



Here is what a British Soldier carrid into Battle during the battle of Hastings in 1066 AD:

No. 623     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 9:29 AM     
Who says testosterone diminishes as males get older?
No. 624     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 10:30 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Who says testosterone diminishes as males get older?


(I almost spit out my protein drink out when reading this ... what are you trying to do to me here, Survivor)! :duck:

Macgyver is my hero when it comes to invention survivalist. I watch new survivalist shows on TV and they truly have nothing ... it's so amazing what they are able to create from nothing.

(not talking about war here though...or are we. I don't know it seems some are discussing hobby, some actual survival, some war ... me though...just trying to be funny).

Taking my estrogen and shoes where they might be bartered for a hogleg now!

No. 625     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 11:55 AM     
I did acquire a new pair of boots this past weekend. Although not the $500 boots I find myself most liking, they suffice with keeping within my budget.

Picked up a pair of CAT Regulators locally. It was the last pair they had in my size and marked down 50%. Although not really a tactical boot. They are a hiking style work boot of full grain leather construction, ASTM spec steel toe, ASTM electric hazard protection, slip resistant, and ergo designed insole.

Most steel toes have had a tendency to inflict some foot pain right at the backend of the steel where the boot/shoe flexes. Been wearing these two days now with no such incident. In fact, they have simply grown much more comfortable each time I have them on.

Appear very durable and rugged. But then again, I thought the same about a similar pair from Gander Mountain. Once I started wearing them daily, they only lasted about 6 months. But then again I was wearing them for typical day to day wear, at work, during tactical firearms classes and during survival classes. They became my every day footwear other than for dress, when at the gym or at Krav Maga classes. Although still very comfortable, they have begun "falling" apart.

The price was right for these CATs, I needed something that could hopefully suffice for tactical and survival training, as well as with a steel toe and electrical protection for work. The job is requiring more and more daily potential of serving a customer at their home, to being on construction worksites. And each and every week I am finding myself just about to agree to accept a contract or two, involving me performing the actual hands on. Just cannot stay away from the industry I guess.
No. 626     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 12:25 PM     
In my mailbox this AM is an invite to the "Annual Spy Escape & Evasion
Event" this coming March 31st - April 1st in Las Vegas. Spy Escape & Evasion is supposedly one of the most well-respected safety and survival training events in the world.

Even though I could likely use a refresher, I will likely not attend this specific event. I already done this same program just last year as a student with Tim Larkin's Target Focus Training. By the way, Tim Larkin is the author of a New York Times bestselling book titled "Surviving The Unthinkable".

This year I am going to put more effort into acquiring and/or completing programs I am already involved, attaining the certifications and credentials, with a goal of eventually becoming some kind of instructor/trainer myself.
No. 627     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Mission_Specialist   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 2:21 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

Soldiers today carry Ipads into Battle, seriously.

Here is what a British Soldier carries into Battle with him today:




"Soldiers today carry Ipads into Battle, seriously."

Seriously, some may carry a Nintendo Game Boy too, but it is not standard issue. If you want a list of those things that HAVE been carried into battle, even for official purposes, you would need about 200 pages. However, MOST soldiers do not require iPads.

"Here is what a British Soldier carries into Battle with him today:"

WRONG!

A British soldier MAY carry these things into battle. MOST soldiers, British or otherwise will not carry the metal detector pictured. MOST will not carry a handgun. MOST will only carry a single knife. MOST will not carry multiple notebooks and SOME will not carry one at all. Gas mask? Handcuffs? Not one but TWO radios?

I got news for you. Most British soldiers only carry about a third of what you see pictured.

Seriously.

No. 628     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 63   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 5:13 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Stormchaser wrote:





.


What kind of car is that, Storm -- it's nice it has room for hauling (I was wondering what the teardrop man got).



It is an '02 Mercury Sable Wagon. Mine looks pretty closely like the one pictured above, though there are some small dings and scratches when you get up close. Still, for a 14 yr. old car (replacing a 20 yr. pickup), it looks good and runs good.

Obviously it is a station wagon, not popular in today's car culture, but that undoubtedly helped me get the car as it was on the market for awhile and no takers. For myself, I am delighted, and it fit my criteria of a vehicle that I could load a lot of camping gear into plus doubling to carry boxes and things to and from my storage garage. Finally, something I could transport my mountain bike in.

I will add this for those who haven't figured it out yet from my numerous posts about it, but I follow and live a somewhat minimalist lifestyle, which includes paying cash (no ongoing debt) for all things, including larger purchases like cars, so older is better, as I avoid debt like the plague it has become in the US and much worse to come.
No. 629     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 63   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 6:37 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

Who says testosterone diminishes as males get older?


(I almost spit out my protein drink out when reading this ... what are you trying to do to me here, Survivor)! :duck:




Lol. But that's what we fellows do at times. I have no real problem with it (and have my own quirks, right?) as long as some semblance of respect is adhered to. In fact, my next post will also do some 'poking.'
No. 630     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jan 12, 2017 at 7:40 PM     
Storm -- the cross overs look very much like station wagons today...and they are deemed cool!

As well isn't there a song about a Mercury? I think mandatory singing of this song should be required in travel! [and I will let you poke instead of me]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3T3MgIRUwj0


No. 631     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Jan 13, 2017 at 10:04 AM     
CAsandie wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3T3MgIRUwj0


Although I am not really a country music fan, most is depressing, I do like Alan Jackson and actually saw him perform this same song live not all that long ago. Twice actually, at each of two different venues I happened to be at.
No. 632     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  CAsandie   Gender: F   Age: 103   on  Jan 13, 2017 at 10:41 AM     
Survivor698 wrote:

CAsandie wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3T3MgIRUwj0


Although I am not really a country music fan, most is depressing, I do like Alan Jackson and actually saw him perform this same song live not all that long ago. Twice actually, at each of two different venues I happened to be at.


My Mom is all country, my Dad was all rock (my brother got into Punk music), I was the only person in my family to get into soul, blues and dance music. I've been exposed to all the genres ... but gravitate to only the uplifting songs myself. Contemporary Christians I've found a mixture of genres.

I agree that Alan Jackson does have some uplifting songs. Got to love this song

(a'ha' -- said in my best country squalling)...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g0mjcMgRmyE

No. 633     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 13, 2017 at 2:34 PM     
Bullfighter279 wrote:

So now I have order a new bag I have had my eye on for well over a year for only $44.99.

The, "Cactus Jack Discreet Tactical Bag": http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/cactus-jack-discreet-tactical-bag

This cool bag can be used as a backpack, it has padded shoulder straps as well as a waist belt. While the waist belt is not padded it should ride lower and more towards my hips than my current backpack does.

And I am thinking I should be able to get an aftermarket padded hip belt to slide onto it.

This pack is not as noticeable as a standard backpack since it is only 8" deep and rides close to your back.

The bag can also be used as a horizontal shoulder strap bag. The shoulder straps hide away when not in use.

Shoulder strap
Top haul handle
Dual side handles
Padded shoulder straps can be covered when not needed
3 external pockets
16" x 9" internal padded sleeve
Compression straps secure load
Rain cover
42.6-liter (2,600-cu. in.) capacity
25" x 8" x 13"h.,
3 lbs.

Heck you could probably fit a 28" Rifle in the thing diagonally! :icon_eek:


Well so far 2 zippers have broken. Not the zipper itself but the pull tab that mounts to it broke off, cheap pot metal. Fortunately each seam has 2 zippers so I still have one on each seam I can use.

I did order a repair zipper and will see what I can do with that.

And yesterday when just 2 blocks from home coming home the lower right shoulder strap failed where it was sewed onto the backpack.

I did have 2 Netbooks in there plus other stuff so was a bit overloaded with weight.

Same exact failure as on my other 3 day assault pack.

So I will empty most everything out of it and carry it to work using the shoulder carry strap that also came with it!

Then will sew the strap back on using heavy duty cordage using the "Awl For All" sewing tool. I had to do the same thing on the other pack.

I think the hip belt threads have popped too but will hold off on that since I ordered 2" wide nylon belt material I may replace the 1.5" belt entirely that came with it.

I may "add" some more ballistic nylon reinforcement material to the corners where the straps mount to so may just hold off until that material I ordered comes in in a few more days. That way I can be sure it will NEVER come off again!

Once the strap is sewn on with that Awl For All tool it should never come off! That is some really heavy duty cord and the repairs I made months ago on the 3 day assault pack are holding up like the day I sewed them.

Overall though, I really like this new backpack a lot better than the old one as it carries much more as far as volume and items are much easier to gain access to.

It also has PALS loops on the top left, very top, and top back for attaching extra pouches. So far I have just one attached to the left side.

I do plan to add more for various reasons as I go along.


I couldn't find the Awl for all tool, misplaced it somewhere when I was changing backpacks awhile back. It will turn up sooner or later after cleaning house.

In the meantime I decided to use the HD waterproof/UV resistant thread I got from Seattle fabrics for making flashlight holders, etc.

It is pretty heavy duty thread. Slightly thicker than normal thread but I was able to thread it through a cheap needle on the 4th try without reading glasses.

Made the necessary repairs to the lower shoulder strap so I am good to go with this Cactus Jack backpack again, which has more room.

The stitches on the other lower strap look ok but I will add some to it tonight to be safe.

It seems the manufacturers skimp on using thread and not enough stitches on those lower straps. That has happened on the last backpack I have been using for a year too.

So tonight i'll bring the nylon goodies I ordered and see what I can sew up by hand between rounds. Maybe a flashlight holder for the small flashlight I have, shouldn't take long.
No. 634     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 14, 2017 at 2:27 AM     
Well I found the Awl for all tool in a hidden zippered compartment on the new backpack I had forgotten about.

Mystery solved!
No. 635     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Jan 14, 2017 at 7:27 AM     
The best survivalist will take advantage of the best options available to him at the moment, that places himself and/or loved ones at the least exposure or risk.
No. 636     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Stormchaser   Gender: M   Age: 63   on  Jan 14, 2017 at 12:29 PM     
crayons wrote:

not goin tp pick on anyone tonight but
i'm not going to stock up on knives or guns
and i'm certainly not going to overstock said items
that can be taken from me and used against me...

plus investing in small items is a waste of time outside
of what you use and can upkeep on yer own...less is more

investing in higher ticket items for resale is smarter.
Profit & time is wasted dealing with hammerheads and
wannabe jarheads on small items that could get you killed.


Though this may work for crayons, I don't find it wise advice for most preppers and those who wish to survive, or survive (somewhat) comfortably.

First of all, if one does not "overstock," whether through acquisition of goods or through agriculture, then one will have nothing to barter, and having nothing to barter in a SHTF situation is a decidedly poor situation to be in.

Granted you always have the problem of thieves, but the wise person will take that into account, just as he does today, and take action to mitigate the threat.

Secondly, although the less is more idea is most definitely a good one when considering the idea of getting out of consumerism for the sake of consumerism and living a simpler lifestye, as just mentioned having such items for barter separates the smart thinkers from the crowd. .22 caliber ammunition, as an example, is 'small' and though comparatively inexpensive, will be one of the most highly valued items to have in a SHTF situation, as it is a common caliber for many weapons, therefore having value in itself as a barter item, substituting for the fiat cash no longer useful other than maybe as TP.

Another example of the value of a small item valuable to have around is extra knives. When I was at a wilderness training camp in Wyoming a few years ago, at nighttime tables made up of long, finished logs, were utilized, complete with lighting set up above them in the outside ares, and a barter fair was created, trading from the wares supplied under the lights. The MOST POPULAR items of interest for barter were knives. I don't see that changing in a SHTF situation.

Finally, the idea of having high-ticket items for trade, though not necessarily a bad idea, sort of is at odds with the idea of not "overstocking" because of the fear of thieves. If thieves break in and steal your items, will they be more interested in low-ticket items or high-ticket? I think we all know the answer to that, so the one argument given in this advice negates the other, if you choose to take such advice.

I have a full-size storage garage which was broken into recently (security has been upgraded since). The garage is basically full of lifelong 'junk' acquired over the years, but there were some items of value, including lots of camping gear. The thieves instead went to one high-ticket item and ignored the rest. They took a Bosch work radio, a very nice item.

So no, both from personal knowledge and experience and from many years of research of what may be of value in a grid-down situation, I don't find the above quoted advice very useful for those who wish to intelligently approach the challenge of what to have for preparation in disaster situations.
No. 637     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 15, 2017 at 6:43 AM     
crayons wrote:

not goin tp pick on anyone tonight but
i'm not going to stock up on knives or guns
and i'm certainly not going to overstock said items
that can be taken from me and used against me...

plus investing in small items is a waste of time outside
of what you use and can upkeep on yer own...less is more

investing in higher ticket items for resale is smarter.
Profit & time is wasted dealing with hammerheads and
wannabe jarheads on small items that could get you killed.


No. 638     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 15, 2017 at 9:42 AM     
There is another survival technique I thought I would mention.

I call this, "The Michelin Man Technique".

There is an African Women who just got off the same train as me here downtown Chicago at Union Station.

I have seen her for the last several years in the City I work in.

She is Homeless, but probably has some source of income such as SSI or something. Likely some sort of mental issue there. But I never see her bothering anyone for $ or anything, I do not think she is an alcoholic like most of them are. She never talks to anyone either, that I have ever seen. I did see her talking to herslef in a Burger King once where she sometimes goes by work.

She carries a 45L backpack, and a few fabric handbags.

She often stays out and sleeps all night on a park bench no matter the weather. She is able to do this because she is bundled up in so many layers her clothing becomes like a Cocoon and or portable outdoor sleeping bag.

One time she took off some of her layers in a Train station and I caught a whiff of her phew!

While all those many layers she wears certainly must keep her warm at night they must be like wearing a sauna sauna suit while walking. :sick:

Wearing layers are good and essential for cold weather protection. But too many can make you overheat, then sweat, which soaks your clothes, which then makes you prone to getting cold.

When hiking you need very little clothing on because your body is acting like a furnace. Once you stop and sit down for awhile and become immobile though that's a different story. You can often need 3-4 times the amount of clothing in order to keep you warm.
No. 639     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 25, 2017 at 12:58 AM     
Well I finally got the inclination after a year to assemble the Military Surplus Stove/Heater and try it out.

Assembled the smokestack and the elbows, reducer, and adapter I had to order separately from another source to tap into an existing fluepipe that goes through my roof.

Had to cut a 4" piece of the 4" x 2' fluepipe that came with it to match up the height.

And only had to use 2 of the fluepipes, still have about 4 more left I didn't need to use.

I installed all the hoses, the fuel regulator, burner assembly, and adapter that installs on the 6 gallon gas can.

Read the assembly instructions first of course!

You have to turn on the fuel control valve, the HI-LOW knob to HI, wait 5-10 minutes for the fuel to flow everywhere it needs to, then turn it to #3 setting.

Then for Diesel you pour 4 oz of fuel in the attached cup which via a little valve on the hose you open up. This cup is attached via a stainless steel cable to the inside of the stove so you can't lose it. Good idea.

Then you lift of the hotplate that you can use to place a coffeepot, frying pan, whatever on and dump the 4oz of fuel into the burner assembly.

For Diesel you light a piece of paper, then toss it in and use the provided steel fire poker to nudge it underneath the burner plate assembly.

Then place the hotplate back on and wait about 5 minutes for the flames to get the burner hot enough to start vaporizing the fuel.

Then you can turn the HI-LO knob to any setting you like after it warms up.

I turned it down as lo as it will go.

It produces 20,000 to 45,000 BTU's.

It says it burns 5/8th's of a Gallon per hour. But it doesn't say if that is on the highest or lowest setting.

So far she's working pretty good! :dance:
No. 640     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 25, 2017 at 1:05 AM     
One thing I neglected to do, and should have is to first fire it up outside like many YouTube videos and websites mentioned to burn all the cosmoline or whatever goop they used to cover it to prevent rust.

It smoked like the dickens as the outside of the stove burned off all that goop covering it. Cough, cough-->> :sick:

I had to open a door for awhile to air the smoke out.

Once you burn all that off, you're good to go.

After a good hot burn off, some people spray paint theirs with black stove paint. It is a special high temperature paint made for woodstoves.

If you don't paint it, it will rapidly form some rust on the outside due to the stove being made out of carbon steel. It won't hurt it, just looks a little rough unless you paint it.

I may paint mine this summer when it warms up outside.
No. 641     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 25, 2017 at 1:14 AM     
There is a little dribble that comes from the fuel can adapter when you first invert it upside down as the fuel forms a vacuum. There is a tiny hole on it that lets air in as the fuel is consumed. This drip is minor and takes place only when you first invert it.

In fact it even comes with a little anti drip ring installed on the hose.

One thing I did have to do was cutoff a piece of the rubber fuel hose where it attaches to the fuel adapter that goes on the can.

being it was installed onto the brass fitting in 1993 it was a little loose, and no amount of tightening of the hose clamp seemed to stop it from turning and leaking. So I cut off a 3/4" piece of it and started with a fresh piece of hose on it. Then tightened it up and it was just fine.

A wire hose type clamp would have fixed the problem without cutting off any hose though.

There is a huge long hose extension that comes with this kit too. I guess that is so you can place the gas can outside the Tent then run the hose in.

No. 642     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 54   on  Jan 25, 2017 at 1:20 AM     
Earlier I had mentioned that I had somehow lost the Knob on the fuel selector.

I didn't, I was looking at the opposite end of the control, the fuel selector plate was on the other side, duh. :icon_rolleyes:

I must not have had my coffee the day I looked at it. :blink:
No. 643     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Feb 13, 2017 at 2:04 PM     
Over the past couple of years there have been a lot of reports of ammo shortages in the US. With speculation as to why pointing the finger at growing civil unrest and that ammo is being horded.

Recently I have seen some news/documentaries that indicate the real reason is illegal sales to Mexico. Supposedly thousands of round are being purchased privately, illegally transported into Mexico, and sold at multiple times more than it costs here in the USA.

After we illegally sold them lots of guns over the past 10 years, they have now run out of ammo.
No. 644     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  crayons   Gender: M   Age: 61   on  Feb 13, 2017 at 3:30 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Over the past couple of years there have been a lot of reports of ammo shortages in the US. With speculation as to why pointing the finger at growing civil unrest and that ammo is being horded.

Recently I have seem some news/documentaries that indicate the real reason is illegal sales to Mexico. Supposedly thousands of round are being purchased privately, illegally transported into Mexico, and sold at multiple times more than it costs here in the USA.

After we illegally sold them lots of guns over the past 10 years, they have now run out of ammo.


i only agree with you in part, don't beleive what the TV says...the ninety
percent narrative doesnt hold water.

fast and furious probably accounts for
4700 weapons, and many more were shipped through mexico to angola to
libya to take down kadafi...And there were reports that hillary was still
supplying cartels after holder resigned.

that being said...the cartels having plenty of cash incorporate ex federales, police, mayors even EX US military/mercs into their groups...if they need anything they'll take it from a police station, buy it from the federales, and there is plenty of everything, even 'china made' availability from the south american black market. And some who launder their money through proper chanels are supplied by elseeayeaye...these rolling gun battles prove there's still plenty to go around.

i get news first hand from long time investigator and several winter residents, saying "THE DON" has the cartels spooked and they are moving to silence the weak low level members who may talk and that even includes musicians who tout one cartel over another. the loyal narco state federales/mexican marines are picking off low hanging fruit with what sounds like shoot to kill orders to shut up some of Neitos flambouyant loose lipped narco buddies.

after over 40 thousand deaths its still on like donkey kong as i write this...

No. 645     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Mar 20, 2017 at 12:11 PM     
CAsandie wrote:

Bullfighter279 wrote:

Here's where I got mine. Check these out, 5 pages worth.

http://www.uniformswarehouse.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?cat=0&dir=asc&order=price&q=flashlight


Good prices! Not sure if this are tactical flashlights though. The tac can shine 2 nautical miles and the strobe can blind a predator. The one you have has an awesome LED charge though (100,000 hours)!

Did you say you sell any on your website?





I market a lot of tactical and survival EDC items. Much obtained from exclusive sources such as the only authorized US distributor, etc..

The hot tactical flashlight at the moment is the Blackwater SR71. Of which I have not located an authorized US distributor.

Comes in 3 materials, aluminum, brass, and titanium. But to obtain it in the highly sought after titanium, this flashlight can run over $300. I can obtain them directly from a distributor in Israel for $199. Many users are happy with the aluminum model, which I can currently get for $99 out of Israel.

I did have some communication with a drop shipper this AM, and I am hoping to land a better price on each of all 3 models.

The sought after add-on tritium vial accessory for these flashlights runs around another $60 alone.

LOL. I received contact from a drop shipper before I hit submit for this post. They are offering me the aluminum model for $59.95, the brass for $95.95, and the titanium for $159.95. All drop shipped for free.

With the current demand for these, I can maybe operate as a reseller at those prices. There is little to no state side competition for these at the moment. I would still have to obtain the desired trit vial accessory from the Israel distributor at about $60. That is too much.

I plan to direct order some of the aluminum model this week to have on hand for local customers. Will likely run my online ad today for all 3 models to be drop shipped.
No. 646     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Mar 20, 2017 at 5:50 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

With the current demand for these, I can maybe operate as a reseller at those prices. There is little to no state side competition for these at the moment. I would still have to obtain the desired trit vial accessory from the Israel distributor at about $60. That is too much.


Received word they will also provide me the tritium vial tail caps for more than 50% off the $60.

Posted my first ad a few minutes ago.
No. 647     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jun 16, 2017 at 12:52 AM     
Just received the battle/war belt, another 4x4 pouch, and a long, wide horizontal MOLLE pouch, as well as an open top with drawstring water bottle MOLLE pouch.

The battle belt I order not for battle but for installing on my backpack that has the thin 1" belt. The battle belt has thick padding around your hips. It has a thick 2" wide pistol belt that slides through it also.

It of course also has PALS webbing for attaching pouches onto.

I am going to modify the belt by sewing it on to the backpack after removing the chincy 1" wide belt off the pack.

I'll use that thick cordage on the Awl For Awl tool to sew it.

Should be MUCH more comfortable after that.

The 4"x4" MOLLE pouch is for organizing those small items like earbuds, chargers, USB cords, etc. Those smaller items tend to get lost in a big backpack.

I need them readily accessible, might mount one to the battle belt.

The long wide MOLLE pouch I got for toothbrush, toothpaste, small baby powder, shaving cream, stuff like that. Again easily accessible without having to dig through a backpack to find them. They are right outside mounted on the top back of the pack.

The water bottle pouch, I got for holding a 16oz sized riot & crowd control sized pepper spray.

I figured with no top on the pouch it would be quick and easy to deploy if needed such as when having to fend off Bears, Mountain Lions, or large groups of human animals....

I already have a MOLLE water bottle pouch, with zippered top cover and side pouch, which would fit a small Esbit emergency stove.It has PALS webbing all over it too.
No. 648     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Jul 20, 2017 at 11:16 PM     
Well the, "Monkeypak" backpack I have been carrying and using daily for about a year or more has served it's useful life. Might use it as a spare bugout bag.

It has split at the rear seam as the material has worn away. I suppose I could order some Ballistic Nylon and sew a patch of sorts on, but I did have rain get in there one day during a heavy downpour, and that's with the Mountainsmith raincover on. But the seam is towards my back, where the raincover doesn't go.

So I ordered this one by Fox Outdoor Products.

"Modular Field Pack". It comes in 5 colors. I got black of course. The reason I chose this pack was because of the abundance of PALS webbing on the back and sides to hold all the MOLLE pouches i've accumulated.






Designed for easy access to gear

1 large main compartment with hydration bladder pocket, Constructed of rugged, tactical polyester, Modular attachment points on front face and side pockets, "keep cool" padded backing for added comfort, Full length opening for ease in packing, 2 Large vertical exterior side pockets, 4 Exterior compression straps & 3 inner, Heavy duty zippers with pull cords, Fully adjustable shoulder straps and a kidney pad.
No. 649     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 4, 2017 at 11:31 PM     
While I feel for her Husband and children everything I have read about Hiking in the Grand Canyon in the middle of Summer says, "Don't do it!"

It can get unbearably hot down in the Canyon, much hotter than the desert floor above. It was a foolish think to do, and her kids could have died as well. And her being an ER Doctor she should have known better.



ER Doctor and Mom of 5 Found Dead in Grand Canyon After Disappearing During Hike
[Inside Edition]
Deborah Hastings
Inside EditionAugust 3, 2017



A Texas doctor and mother of five who vanished while hiking the Grand Canyon has been found dead, authorities said.

Sarah Beadle, 38, was on a 10-mile hike with two children, ages 10 and 11, when of the kids began feeling dizzy from heat exhaustion.

The emergency room physician left the children in a safe spot and went off to get water and help, her husband, Scott, wrote in a Facebook post Wednesday.

“Somewhere along the trail, she made a wrong turn and got lost. The park rangers suspect she died of heat exhaustion,” Scott Beadle wrote.

The mother had been missing for about 24 hours when her body was found. She had been walking the trail with her daughter, Laura, and her nephew, Evan.

The group had run out of water when Laura began feeling ill, the husband said.

The children were later found by other hikers, who gave them water and walked them to the next campground, authorities said.

The Beadles were avid fans of the outdoors. The mother’s Facebook page features a photo of her tandem skydiving.

She worked at Baylor Emergency Medical Center in Keller.

“Our hearts and prayers go out to Dr. Sarah Beadle and her family,” hospital administrators said in a statement Wednesday.

An official cause of death has not yet been released by the National Park Service.

An investigation is being conducted by the service and the Coconino County Medical Examiner’s office.

“Sarah loved traveling with her family and sharing so many wonderful experiences with all of us,” her husband wrote. “I thank you all for your continued prayers and support.”

https://www.yahoo.com/news/er-doctor-mom-5-found-190100594.html
No. 650     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 5, 2017 at 12:14 AM     
Here is another Woman who died Hiking the Grand Canyon in Summer, a Nurse who was Hopi Native American.

http://grandcanyonhiker.com/planners/weather/hothiking.shtml

A Warning About Summer Hiking in the Grand Canyon


Click to learn more about our video: Hiking the Grand Canyon: The Corridor TrailsFrom: Bill Orman
Date: Tuesday, May 30, 2000 6:32 PM
Subject: [grandcanyon] Heat Warning

"A sad and somber note of reminder and warning to readers of this group. One of my dear friends, who happened to be one of our most loved and respected nurses at our little hospital, has just died at the Flagstaff Medical Center from complications of heat stroke. She was Hopi and grew up in this area, and knew well the heat of the desert summer. She was with a group that was doing their annual Memorial Day weekend hike to Rainbow Bridge. This was an experienced group of folks who had been doing this same hike for many years. The heat here has been unrelenting for several weeks now. I day hiked down the Grandview Trail on Saturday, and drank 2.5 gallons of water. And this was in spite of hiking in the early morning and late evening hours. And carrying only a light day pack. I know that we all love the Canyon, but it and the desert southwest are dangerous places this time of year. For those who are from outside the area and are contemplating a southwest hike this summer, I would urge you to consider something safer and more enjoyable than a summer trek in the Canyon. The Zion Narrows, for example, are wonderful, and despite their own set of dangers, are certainly much >more enjoyable and safer than the Canyon at this time of year. Please consider my advice.

Bill Orman
Tuba City, AZ

Bill continues in a subsequent note:

This incident has been a tremendous loss for our whole community and a lesson for us all, even those of us who have done fairly extensive desert hiking. Simply, it is just not worth it to risk everything. I was not on this hike, but had expressed grave reservations last week about its advisibility, given the recent sweltering temperatures. I think that we often get caught up in our schedules when we plan things, and forego common sense to accomodate our activities to our work and vacation plans. This group, for example, always hiked on Memorial Day weekend. It is true that, some years, this is a good time to hike. But not this year. I think this is also a problem with Grand Canyon hikers. We apply for our permits months in advance, and plan our vacations and days off around them, then are reluctant to bag it if conditions are not favorable. Please print my note if you think it would help to warn others. This is something that none of us ever thinks would ever happen to them or someone in their group. All of us are still in a state of disbelief. But it does happen, and it is avoidable."

Bill Orman
Tuba City, AZ
No. 651     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 16, 2017 at 9:44 PM     
One of my wholesalers has survival straws very cheap. Will be picking up a few soon.

Am looking at getting a cold weather sleeping bag rated at 0 or less. I have a few Military Surplus Mummy bags but they are not rated down that low.

Also use a fleece sleeping bag liner. It will be much more comfy than nylon next to you and keep your bag cleaner and warmer.

Your body expires persperation during the night.

Better it is absorbed into your liner which you can easily hang up and air out to dry in the sun than letting your sleeping bag get soaked with sweat rendering it not as good at keeping you warm.

This is especially important during longer term camping in winter.
No. 652     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 16, 2017 at 9:50 PM     
First Aid Kits:

I sell a huge and wide variety of them. Have or make multiple ones for your cars, bugout bag, pocket size to keep on you at all times, etc.

They are cheaper than a Doctor or Hospital visit and bills and can prevent just that!

Often times the cheap bandaids which come in First Aid kits don't stick very well. Throw them out and replace them with name brand ones such as Curad or others.

You can make up your own First Aid kits by buying the cabinets or carrying cases barebones then adding to them as time and funds allow.

Or you can make up your own with bags or carrying cases, cabinets you already have on hand.

A little every time you go to the Drug or Dollar Store, Walmart, etc.
No. 653     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Aug 20, 2017 at 7:47 PM     
BTW - Despite TCG's concerns with Earth Ex, there is some good basic video based emergency/survival training on the individual/family website provided by EIS/Earth Ex website that can be accessed for free.

They sell some survival things on there also, but you can obtain more for your money elsewhere and/or by designing your own kit.

http://www.planetready.com/
No. 654     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 24, 2017 at 8:26 PM     
The subcaliber insert for my flare pistol arrived today. Didn't have time to read it or the letter from the ATF stating it is a legal device. Will do that tomorrow when I get back home.

I did order a few other things with it one of which was this really cool and heavy duty bag. Well worth the $15! (I actually got 25% off of that even with a coupon).

It has 2 built in PALS straps on the back for strapping it to your MOLLE belt or in my case, I am going to use it to strap on top of my backpack for adding a little extra space to it.

It also has 4 metal buckles for strapping it down with some nylon webbing in addition to the PALS loops.

Plus it has some thick plastic buckles for strapping it to your standard waist belt and using it as a fanny or belt pack on the back of your waist.

It has 4 compartments, 2 zippered ones on each end, a large main compartment with zipper on top, and another compartment with zipper on front.

It also has MOLLE webbing on both side pouches and on the front for attaching even more MOLLE pouches if desired.

Comes with a really heavy duty nylon strap which appears quite wide for such a small bag, this thing could carry some weight! Has a heavy duty snap Release buckle on the shoulder strap for quickly dumping it if need be in an emergency.

The shoulder strap also doubles as a waist belt to hold the pack that way if desired.

Also has 2 built in snap buckle straps which go over the top of the 2 main zippered compartments so even if the zippers fail it holds the contents safely inside.

Plus a heavy duty nylon carrying handle on top.

This thing might make a good small gun range bag. Would likely hold 2 pistols and a few boxes of ammo too.

But I bought it to hold and organize all my many "chargers" for various electronic devices.

I have one for recharging my bike light.Another for my handheld Ham radio, one for my mini netbook, a small "AA" and "AAA" charger, a charger for my small rechargeable flashlight, etc.

All 7 reviewers give this bag a full 5 stars. I can see why!


48 OPS Tactical Response Pack

Heavy duty metal zippers
Rugged 600D tactical polyester construction
Main compartment, front pocket, two side pockets
Includes rollout adjustable waist or shoulder strap
MOLLE webbing attachment capacity
Heavy duty metal zippers

"When you need to move out in a hurry, it pays to keep all your essential items together. With a place for everything, this multifunctional carrying case by M48 OPS also doubles as a fanny pack. It features MOLLE webbing for attaching additional gear, as well as several zippered pockets. Ideal for first responders, security, search and rescue, hiking and travel. Available in tan, black and OD."

http://www.budk.com/M48-Ops-Tactical-Response-Pack-32782






No. 655     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Aug 25, 2017 at 10:18 AM     
I have a couple very similar bags to the above. They cost me more due to simply saying 5.11 on them.

They are way too small though to be a convenient and effective gun range bag.
No. 656     Reply: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Aug 25, 2017 at 2:00 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

I have a couple very similar bags to the above. They cost me more due to simply saying 5.11 on them.

They are way too small though to be a convenient and effective gun range bag.


BTW - I also have that exact same bag with M48 on it. Purchased it for less on Amazon than what BudK is currently asking for it once the cost of shipping is added.
No. 657     Reply: Re: Re: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 25, 2017 at 10:47 PM     
Survivor698 wrote:

Survivor698 wrote:

I have a couple very similar bags to the above. They cost me more due to simply saying 5.11 on them.

They are way too small though to be a convenient and effective gun range bag.


BTW - I also have that exact same bag with M48 on it. Purchased it for less on Amazon than what BudK is currently asking for it once the cost of shipping is added.


I got it for $11.24 from BudK.

Looks like it would be a bit too small for large sized firearms but medium or small frame sizes would do just fine I think.

Anyway that's not what I ordered it for.

I mounted it to the top of my backpack and accessing cords is now quick and easy leaving more room in the backpack for other stuff.
No. 658     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 26, 2017 at 5:55 PM     
A third item I ordered along with the M48 Tactical Ops bag and the subcaliber insert is this cool emergency stove. It came with 8 fuel tabs also. It said 24 on the package but only 8 large ones inside so maybe they changed the shape of them and made them larger. Regardless, still worth the $6.99 I paid for it. It seems to be made a bit heavier than the original "Esbit" brand pocket folding stove and I think this one is made out of thin steel.



But after the 25% off coupon it was only $5.24.

They sell a few varieties of them: http://knives.budk.com/search?w=stove&view=grid

I have an original Esbit brand one on order through another company too but it's still on back order.
No. 659     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Aug 26, 2017 at 6:28 PM     
And of course also ordered the .45LC/.410 Shotgun shell insert that fits in my 26.5mm Flare Pistol.

Regular price was $59.99 but after the 25% off coupon was only $44.96.

" Fits into standard 26.5 mm flare gun
Flare gun insert allows you to fire .45 Long Colt or .410 shotgun ammo
Encased in corrosion resistant adapter
Offset barrel is positioned to make perfect shot every time
Made in USA by Runway Sub Cal
Flare gun and ammo not included
Includes BATF letter

This Item Cannot Ship to the Following States: NJ, MA, NY, CA "

Will have to test this thing out at the local gun range using .45LC ammo sometime.



[

These handy little devices are very popular with Boaters who keep them on board for use in jurisdictions where a standard firearm may be illegal (or when traveling through those areas).

They come in a variety of calibers, .22LR, .38 Special, .45LC/.410 shotgun shell, and others.

http://knives.budk.com/search?w=subcaliber
No. 660     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Survivor698   Gender: M   Age: 103   on  Sep 30, 2017 at 6:21 PM     
I spent this afternoon at a disaster preparedness and survival expo. I was invited to have exhibits of my own there this time, but simply did not have time to pull anything together.

This actually was not as good an event as in the past, but I maybe only feel that way because I did not take time to attend any of the hourly presentations/classes/speakers. Was too busy attempting to get around and make some kind of contact with each distributor and see what they offer. In the past I have attended the classes. Wish I had this time.

Out of all the contacts I made, maybe only three were really worthwhile for my interests.

I talked to the HAM radio guys and have been invited to a local meeting of theirs this coming Monday evening.

Also talked extensively with a CERT official (Citizen Emergency Response Team). Although I have too many irons in the fire already, I have great interest in more volunteer type activities. He invited me to follow up with him.

Last but not least, a little blonde approached me and read my shirt to me. She said I go to that gym. She was referring to my Krav Maga gym which I obviously had on a shirt from there. They have me kind of serve as their rep when I attend such events. Anyway, I replied I have not really been there much since July, sharing I endured an ACL strain and meniscus tear. She replied she had not really been their either having pulled some tendon in her arm during a Krav class. I shared my injury was not from Krav, but was a result of helping a friend carry all his furniture down like 5 sets of stairs. She shared she works just a couple doors down from us in the ammo store. Our Krav school enjoys huge discounts on ammo from them, and passes the savings on to we students. She invited me to come see her directly in the future, and she will provide me a larger discount than the school is currently getting. I replied I would definitely not be buying the volume the Krav school does. She said to not worry about it, she will take care of me. I was not prepared to buy any ammo today, but she had 1000 round cases of 9mm and 40 that she would have discounted to well under $200 per case. That is a great price for me on the 40. I did not say anything to her about it, but I have a source that provides me a lower price on 1000 rounds of military grade 9mm.

BTW - She was open carrying a .380 on her hip. I was carrying a small .380 concealed. We talked quite a while but I never shared I was carrying.
No. 661     Reply: Re: Survival/Disaster Gear   
By:  Bullfighter279   Gender: M   Age: 55   on  Sep 30, 2017 at 7:37 PM     
Also talked extensively with a CERT official (Citizen Emergency Response Team). Although I have too many irons in the fire already, I have great interest in more volunteer type